My First Podcast: Tea, Toast, & Trivia with Rebecca Budd

Hello everyone! I’ve got some exciting news. My friend, Rebecca Budd, invited me to her podcast called Tea, Toast, & Trivia at https://teatoasttrivia.com/. While you’re at it, this blog is wonderful to follow. You’ll meet new friends here… I guarantee it! I’ve shared the link to the podcast below. I hope you’ll have a listen. 🥳

Tea Toast & Trivia

Season 4 Episode 33: Traveling to Halifax with Michelle Hunter

Welcome to Tea Toast and Trivia. Thank you for listening in. Living in the reality of Covid-19, travel has been curtailed, internationally as well as domestically.   While travel is coming back, I have found that virtual travel is possible through the alchemy of technology. Welcome to Tea Toast & Trivia – “The Virtual Journey” which […]

#TANKATUESDAY Weekly #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 244 #EKPHRASTIC #PHOTOPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

WordPress has done it again! They’ve retired a bunch of themes and mine was one of them. There isn’t much selection out there anymore for anyone unless you want a one page theme. There are NO premium themes anymore. Now, all you pay extra for is CSS codes, which I’ve saved through the years. If you’re having issues with your theme, check and see if it’s been retired. OK… enough of that! Let’s get on with the good stuff!

Merril D. Smith selected the image this week. It’s a lithograph and you can read more about it HERE. Remember, we can see what’s in the image, so write your poem using the image as an inspiration. Don’t just describe what you see in the lithograph. Think about metaphor and allegory. Just remember to check what form you’re using. Some of the Japanese forms frown upon the use of metaphors. This challenge explores Ekphrastic writing, inspired by visual art.

Image Credit: https://libwww.freelibrary.org/digital/item/66272

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ this FIRST: How to Start Crafting Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

  • Write your poem inspired by the Ekphrastic image above using a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheatsheet OR from the Poetscollective.org. BE creative and try alternative forms. Make sure you follow the directions on how to write the form. It’s always fun to share how to write the write the form so we can all learn together. Remember… we are still working with syllabic poetry forms.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work. Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on social media:

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the name of the form you created in the title of your post.

So, Word Crafters… who wants to have fun and write some syllabic poetry?


Smorgasbord Book Reviews Rewind – Word Craft: Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry by Colleen M. Chesebro

What a lovely surprise to find a reshare of Sally Cronin’s review of Word Craft: Prose & Poetry. I’m thrilled!

If you think you can’t write poetry… you haven’t tried syllabic poetry! Join us for #TankaTuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com each week. It’s time to spread your creative wings! <3

“Summer’s End,” #tankaprose #TankaTuesday

Our Tanka Tuesday challenge this week is to write some tanka prose. We typically write tanka prose in the 5-7-5-7-7 or a s/l/s/l/l five-line syllabic structure. Tanka prose should contain a title. There is one basic requirement in writing tanka prose: one paragraph, and one tanka.

There are two basic forms in classic tanka prose: Preface (explanation) and the Poem Tale (episodic narration). Tanka prose does not rhyme.

Preface (explanation): Is where the prose explains the basic information in the narrowest sense. It is a factual summary of the experience. Usually, you write one prose paragraph and one tanka.

Poem Tale (episodic narration): The poem tale/episodic narration is a more formal structure where you share a more personal experience through your prose. In general, the tanka poem is always the center on which the narrative episode (prose) comes from. Write your tanka first. With this type of tanka prose, the prose often shares a beginning, middle, and an end, as if it were a short story. You can have one or more tanka within the prose.

Below, I’ve crafted an episodic narration:

“Summer’s End”

During this morning’s walk, I felt the first hint of Autumn. The trees looked bedraggled by last week’s heat wave. The leaves, like an old hat, looked dull against the backdrop of a blue scrap of sky.

summer's passage creeps
through the leaves, colors dreary
Autumn hears the call...
red and gold hues dress the trees
a farewell to summertime

A sound in the trees overhead caught my attention. I watched as the sleek tan-colored body of a Sandhill Crane rose from the nearby edge of the pond. Cranes are the messengers of the gods, and even in Michigan, such a sighting is rare. It is said, if you see a crane; it is to remind ourselves of the passage of time and our mortality.

the wheel of time turns
spinning toward the future
use your time—wisely...
love longer, laugh hard, hate less,
and learn to forgive yourself

I stood at the edge of the pond, a witness to the passage of time, until the buzz of mosquitoes reminded me I should be on my way. Time marches on…

© Colleen M. Chesebro

Episodic narration tanka prose is one of the most freeing forms to write. In this piece above, I was careful to stay true to the construction of the tanka portions by creating two meanings separated by the pivot in line three of each tanka. This is where you take the first three lines of your tanka to create one meaning. Then, take line 3, 4, and 5 to create the second meaning to your poem.

summer's passage creeps
through the leaves, colors dreary
Autumn hears the call...
Autumn hears the call...
red and gold hues dress the trees
a farewell to summertime

I kept both messages in this tanka similar because I was showing the passage of time. This is the theme of the piece.

The prose shares my experience during this morning’s walk. I made sure and used a metaphor in the first paragraph to help set the mood. Later, I used the Sandhill Crane taking off in flight as a metaphor for the passage of time. Tanka prose is where you can get poetic by including metaphors and similes. If you don’t know what those are, look up their definitions.

The prose and poetry combine to read like a short story with a beginning, middle, and an ending. Autumn, signifies the dying time of year before winter’s long slumber. The passage of time is a favorite theme in Japanese poetry. I love autumn… it’s my favorite time of the year.

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the #TankaTuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

Here’s a recent review from D. L. Finn on Amazon.com:

In “Word Craft: Prose & Poetry” Ms. Chesebro has written a detailed guide of syllabic poetry. There’s history, instructions on writing the poem, several examples, and then the information is recapped for each form. Section one of the book offers Japanese Syllabic Poetry. Here are the chapters covered, Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, and Renga. Then the second section is the American Syllabic Poetry. The types covered here are Crapsey Cinquain and all variations, Etheree, Nonnet, and Shadorma. Although I’ve spent years writing free verse poetry, I’ve come to love syllabic poems too, thanks to Ms. Chesebro. This is a fantastic guide to learn about syllabic poetry and how to write them. I will buy the paperback version for a quick reference to a style I want to try or simply refresh my memory on writing a certain type of poem. I highly recommend this guide for all poets who love this style or would like to learn about it.

#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 241, #SPECIFICFORM: Tanka Prose

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the fifth Tuesday of the month! This is our chance to work with a specific syllabic poetry form. Take this opportunity to learn more about the particular form.

This week’s form is:

tanka prose

Here’s a quick review of the tanka prose form:

We typically write tanka prose in the 5-7-5-7-7 or a s/l/s/l/l five-line syllabic structure. Tanka prose should contain a title. There is one basic requirement in writing tanka prose: one paragraph, and one tanka.

There are two basic forms in classic tanka prose: Preface (explanation) and the Poem Tale (episodic narration). Tanka prose does not rhyme.

Preface (explanation): Is where the prose explains the basic information in the narrowest sense. It is a factual summary of the experience. Usually you write one prose paragraph and one tanka.

Poem Tale (episodic narration): The poem tale/episodic narration is a more formal structure where you share a more personal experience through your prose. In general, the tanka poem is always the center around which the narrative episode (prose) comes from. Write your tanka first. With this type of tanka prose, the prose often shares a beginning, middle, and an end, as if it were a short story. You can have one or more tanka within the prose.

Read & Download: The PDF by Woodward-The Elements of Tanka Prose

Refer to Word Craft: Prose & Poetry, chapter Eight: Tanka Prose in English: https://amzn.to/2V0awOp

For this #TankaTuesday Poetry Challenge, write a tanka prose poem, either as a “preface” or a “episodic narration.”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more. This site does the hard work for you.

THE RULES

  • Write a tanka prose poem.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL: https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink). You might have to delete your previous entry.
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY on @SyllabicPoetry

If you add hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) we can find your poetry on social media.

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the name of the form you created in the title of your post.

Now, have fun and write some tanka prose poetry!


#TankaTuesday: #PhotoPrompt – haiku

It’s the hottest it’s been in Michigan this summer. When I walk in the morning, I can smell Autumn right around the corner. Cheryl picked out the best photo for our challenge this week.

Timeanddate.com shares:

The Perseids are one of the brighter meteor showers of the year. They occur every year between July 17 and August 24 and tend to peak around August 9-13.

timeanddate.com
falling stars—
flashes of promise
for a new day

© Colleen M. Chesebro

My latest book will have you crafting poetry the same day. Here is a recent review:

D. W. Peach reviewed May 25, 2021: This book is a must-have for writers of syllabic poetry. Chesebro has the experience and credentials to have crafted this easy to follow and detailed look at twelve forms of Japanese and American syllabic poetry, as well as their variations. Styles range from the well-known haiku and tanka to the less familiar gogyohka and etheree. Though written for poets beginning their exploration of these beautiful forms, I learned quite a lot (and I’ve been writing several of the forms for years).

Chesebro’s explanations not only include the technical aspects of each poetic form, but a quick history, the style’s creative intent, and tips for finding inspiration and writing. These aspects of each poetic form are conveyed in a concise manner, and each section is followed by examples of her poetry and the poetry of authors I’ve enjoyed for years. The poems not only illustrate the preceding lesson but are beautiful in their own right.

The quality of this book and its citations make it useful as a “text book” on the craft of writing syllabic poetry, appropriate for academic settings. Chesebro’s conversational style, easy to understand explanations, and poetic selections also make it accessible to a wide range of learners. The book’s format lends itself to lesson-planning for young poets.

Highly recommended to poets who are just starting out or who’ve been writing for years. An excellent learning tool filled with wonderful examples of the forms.

You can find my books here: Amazon Author Page

#TANKA TUESDAY WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 238, #SYNONYMSONLY

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Welcome! Check out the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Book Store where you can find links to some of the challenge poet’s Amazon Author Pages. If you have a book you would like to have added, let me know in the comments. <3

It’s the second week of the month! Are you ready to choose some syllables to use in your poetry? Selma from last month’s challenge had the opportunity to choose the two words for this month. I didn’t hear from her, so I selected your two words:

Sanctuary & Follow

On the Monday recap, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme. For this poetry challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the cheatsheet OR from the forms found on Poetscollective.org.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

Sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

The RULES

Write a poem using a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheatsheet OR from Poetscollective.org. It’s time for us to branch out! BE creative and try new forms. Make sure you follow the directions on how to write the form. Don’t forget to tell us what form you chose.

Post it on your blog.

Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).

Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

If you add hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on social media:

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the form you wrote in the title.


SUBMISSIONS ARE CLOSED

The Word Weaving Poetry Journal is closed. The first edition will publish October 1, 2021.

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


The Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Cheat Sheet

The Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Cheat Sheet has been updated. Remember, if you are using these instructions to enter poetry contests and journals, do your research. This is only a brief description of how to write the different forms of syllabic poetry.

I’ve done the work of researching these syllabic forms for you. Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available as an Ebook and a Print book. mybook.to/WordCraftProsePoetry Let’s write syllabic poetry together! <3

WORD CRAFT: PROSE & POETRY, THE ART OF CRAFTING SYLLABIC POETRY IS NOW AVAILABLE IN PAPERBACK

I’m thrilled to announce that the print version of Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is now available on Amazon. The last week has been a wild ride! I did my best to keep the costs low enough for everyone to purchase the book. Please enjoy! <3

Are you ready to learn how to craft Japanese and American poetry? Consider this book the first step on your journey to learning the basics of how to craft syllabic poetry. Inside, you will discover many new forms, syllable combinations, and interpretations of the different Japanese and American forms and structures of haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, renga/solo renga, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, the cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, and shadorma poetry.

So… what are you waiting for? Let’s craft syllabic poetry together!

Let’s celebrate!

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry, The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry is now Available in Paperback

I’m thrilled to announce that the print version of Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is now available on Amazon. The last week has been a wild ride! I did my best to keep the costs low enough for everyone to purchase the book. Please enjoy! <3

Are you ready to learn how to craft Japanese and American poetry? Consider this book the first step on your journey to learning the basics of how to craft syllabic poetry. Inside, you will discover many new forms, syllable combinations, and interpretations of the different Japanese and American forms and structures of haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, renga/solo renga, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, the cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, and shadorma poetry.

So… what are you waiting for? Let’s craft syllabic poetry together!

Let’s celebrate!