#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 284 – #SpecificForm: 4/11

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. Yvette selected this week’s challenge. We were to write our syllabic poem using the 4/11 syllabic form created by Gwen Plano.

I was so pleased to see so many of you embrace this form. It just goes to show that syllabic poetry doesn’t have to be difficult to write. Eleven lines, with four syllables per line, says so much!

Just a reminder… don’t forget to add your published post link to Mr. Linky! 💜💚💛

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena 10.kittysverses 19.Margaret 21 
2.ben Alexander 11.anita dawes 20.theindieshe 
3.Gwen Plano 12.Harmony Kent 21.Colleen Chesebro 
4.willowdot21 13.Yvette M Calleiro 22.Jude 
5.The Versesmith 14.Kerfe 23.Smitha 
6.Cheryl 15.Jules 24.Vashti Q. Vega 
7.Balroop Singh 16.Annette Rochelle Aben 25.You’re next!
8.Sylvia Cognac 17.Ruth Klein   
9.Selma 18.D. L. Finn   

This was a tough week to select only one poem. I loved all of them! There was so much creativity! I read them over and over. 💜

A special thank you to Harmony Kent and Annette Rochelle Aben for their help in tweeting and sharing all our posts on social media. I couldn’t do this without you guys. 🙏🏻 ❤️

Check out Smitha’s poetry, photography, and artwork!

If you’re looking for a photographic vacation (I was) then you must read Margaret’s poem and enjoy the photos.

I selected Jules’ poem, “Airy Wonderland,” to feature. I loved the idea of staring at the clouds as the shapes take on new meaning. Cloud dreaming is a summer adventure; and as summer slips away, remember to grab those moments. Soon, autumn will present itself and summer will be a distant memory.

"Airy Wonderland"

Captivating
In all my days
Those puffy clouds
Taking on shapes
Images from those
Storied fables
White rabbit in
A spruced waist vest
Waiting to take
Me through the sky
Captivating

© JP/dh

This week, I’ve asked Jules to choose the specific form she’d like to practice for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

September Specific Theme: Jules

August Photo Prompt: Reena

August Theme Prompt: Sarah

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

Summer Magic, #TankaTuesday, #SpecificForm

This week, I finally found the time to write my poem for #TankaTuesday. The bathrooms are now a finished project! We even found time yesterday, to the paint the bare wood around the bottom of the deck. We hope to put up some plastic trellis around the base before summer’s end.

It was Yvette’s choice this week. She selected a form created by Gwen Plano called the 4-11, which is eleven lines of four syllables each.

NOTE: https://sodacoffee.com/syllables, the syllable counter we’ve used for years, now displays a 404 error page. In the past, they revamped the site and changed the address. I’m not sure if that is the case this time. So, use the syllable counter at How Many Syllables: https://www.howmanysyllables.com/syllable_counter/. Be aware that How Many Syllables sometimes is off in the count. Double check your syllable count.

Summer Magic

Summer magic
still shines—grab it!
Dance with fireflies,
waltz with fairies,
tell ghost stories
around the fire...
bond together.
Autumn hovers
in the raindrops.
Remember the
summer magic.

© Colleen M. Chesebro

I can’t believe we’re half way through August! Before you know it, summer will be a distant memory. Spend these last weeks with your family, enjoying time together. It’s all so precious. 💜

Join me and learn how to write syllabic poetry! Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available in print and ebook versions on Amazon.com.

TankaTuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 284, 8/9/22, #SpecificForm: 4-11

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

Last month, I asked Yvette Calleiro to select a syllabic form for us to learn more about. Her choice was a form that Gwen Plano created, called the 4-11. You can find her 4-11 form HERE.

FAST FACTS

Gwen says the 4-11 is a stanza of eleven lines, four syllables each line. The beginning line also repeats as the last line. Here is Gwen’s example.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry?

READ THIS FIRST: How to craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

RhymeZone.com

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

  • Write your syllabic poem. Try not to use “ing” ending words to satisfy the word count.
  • Post it on your blog. Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL: https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink). You might have to delete your previous entry.
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

MR. LINKY BELOW

Follow the schedule listed below:

August Specific Form: Yvette

 August Photo Prompt: Reena

 August Theme Prompt: Sarah

Now, have fun and write some 4-11 poetry!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 283 | #TastetheRainbow, Chakra Color Poetry

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a chakra color. We could use a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Sylvia Cognac7.Gwen Plano13.Colleen Chesebro
2.ben Alexander8.Cheryl14.Pat
3.Balroop Singh9.anitadawesauthor@ btinternet. com15.Annette Rochelle Aben
4.Harmony Kent10.Jules16.Reena
5.Eugenia11.Vashti Quiroz- Vega17. You’re next!
6.Laura McHarrie12.Ruth Klein  

Great job this week, poets! 🥳

I don’t know about anyone else, but I enjoyed the challenge of choosing a chakra color to write about. When you use color in your poetry, it helps others connect emotionally to your poem.

When we employ the psychology of color, our symbolism deepens in meaning. For example, I used the color blue, which can also allude to one being sad or morose. However, when we employ the chakra color theory to our symbolism, we learn the color blue is associated with “heaven, or pure mind.”

Jules chose the green (heart chakra). She used the color in specific ways. Kaeru (the frog) is green, and she wrote about love in her haibun. Notice how the symbolism in her poem deepened the meaning. Those connections to the heart chakra came through loud and clear. Usually, the color green implies jealousy, but not when we use chakra color theory.

Don’t be afraid to experiment with color theory in your poetry and other writings: https://www.verywellmind.com/color-psychology-2795824

August Specific Form: Yvette

August Photo Prompt: Reena

August Theme Prompt: Sarah

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

“Blue of Pure Mind,” chōka & hanka

Image by Peter Lomas from Pixabay
the blue throat chakra...
a nexus to the divine
blue hues of heaven
serene, calm, tranquility
found in a blue sky,
slow down, make time to be still
listen to your voice
obey the stillness within
blue the color of pure mind

uncluttered by thoughts
in silence, one can perceive
blue—the purest mind
open wide... the throat chakra 
your seat of creativeness

© Colleen M. Chesebro

This week for #TankaTuesday, I asked everyone to select one of the seven chakra colors to feature in their poetry. Color is a powerful poetic tool, and when used in poetry, it helps to convey our thoughts and feelings.

I wrote a chōka followed by a hanka (tanka) according to the cheat sheet:

The chōka (long poem) was the storytelling form of Japanese poetry from the 1st to the 13th century. It is unrhymed and written in alternating five and seven-syllable lines that end with an extra seven-syllable line. The early form consisted of a series of katuata joined together. (A katuata is 5-7-7 (19) onji, or 5-7-5 (17) onji) and is required for your poem. It is composed of any number of couplets made up of alternating 5-7 onji (sound syllables) per line. In English, we can only treat the onji as a syllable. A nine-line chōka is 5-7-5-7-5-7-5-7-7 or 5-7-7-5-7-5-7-7-7. Chōka often were followed by one or more short poems called hanka, or “envoys,” summarizing, supplementing, or elaborating on the contents of the main poem. Often, a tanka would serve as an envoy.”

Word Craft Poetry Cheat Sheet

#TankaTuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge No. 283: #Tastetherainbow-“Chakra” Color Poetry

Hello everyone. Happy August! This week for #TankaTuesday, choose your own syllabic form and a chakra color to feature in your poem. If the form is from the #TankaTuesday cheat sheet, let us know so we know where to look for directions. If it’s a new form, share how to write it and where you found the instructions.

This week let’s add something special to our color poetry. I want you to concentrate on the Chakra colors, and select one of those to feature in your poem. What are the chakra colors?

Chakra Colors In Order

Let’s begin by looking at each of your chakras and their color correspondence in order:

Image Credit: https://7chakrastore.com/blogs/news/chakra-colors

Here is a link that will explain the chakra colors: https://www.chakra-anatomy.com/chakra-colors.html

Take a few minutes to reflect on the chakra colors. What color are you drawn to? When you picture the most vibrant color, what color do you see? What does it remind you of, what emotions do you associate with it, and how does it make you feel? Describe the impact this color has (on you and/or the world around you). What insights can you glean from this color and your interpretation of it?

Now write your poem… minding the rules of the form you chose.

💜 💜 💜

Color Meanings – The Power and Symbolism of Colors

Color Symbolism in Literature: What Do Colors Mean in Literature and Poetry?

Symbolism – Definition & Examples

💜 💜 💜

P.S. 🌈 Taste the Rainbow refers to colors. You do not have to write about a rainbow in your poem. Just include a color in your poem. 🌈


Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry—The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

*Write your poem and post it on your blog.

*USE sodacoffee.com/syllables to count your syllables. That way, we are all using the same syllable counter.

*Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).

*Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

*Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

*Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

*Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

Follow the schedule listed below:

Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 August Specific Form: Yvette

💚 August Photo Prompt: Reena

💛 August Theme Prompt: Sarah

Now, have fun and write some chakra color themed poetry!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 282, #ThemePrompt: “The Longest Day”

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Harmony Kent7.ben Alexander13.theindieshe
2.Reena Saxena8.I deleted Margaret’s extra link14.Margaret 21
3.willowdot219.D. L. Finn15.Mayuri Srivastava
4.Gwen Plano10.Annette Rochelle Aben16.Ruth Klein
5.Cheryl11.Jules17.Jane Aguiar
6.Sarah David12.Colleen Chesebro18.You’re next!

Whew! What a week! I’ve been working on some creative projects this week, so I’ve been extra busy. Our contractor should finish the last bathroom on Tuesday! I can’t wait for this chapter of home renovations to be over.

👉🏻 🥳 👉🏻 I came across this blog post by Ken Hume HERE about writing poetry with your whole life. This is a great read! Please stop by Ken’s blog and share your thoughts. 👏🏻

Harmony picked a tough theme this week. What did your longest day look like? This week, I went with Sarah David’s shadorma poem, “Solstice.” The summer solstice was my first thought on the theme of the longest day. I liked the flow of this poem. Sarah captures the essence of the summer solstice in so few words.

Solstice

summer’s breath
blistering sunrise
glowing still
long past day
simmering into sunset
lengthening shadows

© Sarah David

This week, I’ve asked Sarah David to choose the theme prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Upcoming Prompt Poets

Specific Form: Yvette

Photo: Reena

Theme: Sarah

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

“The Longest Day,” Arquain

This week for #TankaTuesday (click the link to join in the challenge) Harmony selected the theme of “the longest day.” I chose the Arquain form found on the Poetscollective.org.

The Arquain is written in three stanzas, with the following syllable count per stanza: 1, 2, 3, 4 for the first stanza. 5,7, 7, 5, for the second, with an end rhyme for the two seven syllable end words. The third stanza is 4, 3, 2, 1 syllables.

The Longest Day

white
hot pain
rips within
time is endless

I pant, I hold back—
my child longs to be set free
primal screams my only plea
I must stop the pain

life's water breaks
I push hard
he is
born

© Colleen M. Chesebro

My son was my longest birth… about six hours of labor. He weighed 9 lbs. 11 oz, and was almost 23 inches long. The old adage that you forget the pain of childbirth isn’t true. At least, it wasn’t for me.

It was literally the longest day of my life! LOL!

#TANKATUESDAY Weekly #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 282, 7/26/22, #THEMEPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Here we are for another #TankaTuesday poetry challenge! Are you ready for a theme prompt? Harmony selected this month’s theme.

This month’s theme is:

“The Longest Day”

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Start Crafting Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

  • Write a poem based on the above theme using a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheat sheet OR from the Poetscollective.org using the theme above.
  • *USE sodacoffee.com/syllables to count your syllables. That way, we are all using the same syllable counter. 
  • Post it on your blog. Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy the https:// address link of your published post into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

MR. LINKY BELOW

Follow the 2022 schedule listed below:

August Specific Form: Yvette

August Photo Prompt: Reena

July Theme Prompt: Harmony

Join me and learn how to write syllabic poetry! Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available in print and ebook versions on Amazon.com.

Now, have fun and write some syllabic poetry!


#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 281 | #PhotoPrompt, #Ekphrastic

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena7.Jules13.Ruth Klein
2.willowdot218.theindieshe14.D.G. Kaye
3.ben Alexander9.Yvette M Calleiro15.kittysverses
4.Gwen Plano10.Goutam Dutta16.Margaret 21
5.Balroop Singh11.Selma17.Mayuri Srivastava
6.The Versesmith12.Annette Rochelle Aben18.You’re next!

We’re almost at the end of our bathroom renovation. One more week… because of a cracked counter top which had to be replaced. By next weekend, we should be finished, fini, terminado, done!! I miss writing poetry! I am renovation’d out! It’s been a long year and a half of waiting for contractors, waiting for supplies, and waiting for it all to be over. If you’ve never done renovations, let me tell you, it’s messy, dirty, and hugely disruptive. We’re almost at the finish line!

Many thanks to all of you for writing syllabic poetry this week. I apologize for the time it took me to read and comment on your poems. On top of the renovations, we found another leak under the sink, and my Wi-Fi/computer had hiccups again! The plumber gets another call tomorrow, and I think I solved the issues with my Wi-Fi. Trouble shooting is a wonderful thing.

I want to thank Willow for providing the photo of the statue from St. Pancras station. Margaret, from FROM PYRENEES TO PENNINES shares more information about the statue and the station, which I found really interesting.

This statue inspired a wide range of poetry. I loved how everyone interpreted this piece of art differently. That’s important to your poetry and sharing what you see or feel is the whole idea behind Ekphrastic poetry.

Reena’s Blason poem really spoke to me. The form is interesting—a new form for me. Also, I detected some negative energy from the statue, as did a few other poets. (This was before I read Margaret’s informative post about the statue).

Reena’s poem is an excellent example of selecting the perfect form to portray the “spirit” of the statue.

Poetscollective.org states:

Blason is a genre of poetry committed to the praise or blame of something through the use of a series of images that support the theme. It is a variation of the ancient Catalogue Poem. From French heraldry, blason translates as “the codified description of a coat of arms” Originally French poet, Clement Marot, wrote a poem praising a woman by listing parts of her body with metaphors to compare with them. Parts of the female body became a recurring topic of the Blason and continues to be the focus, although other subjects could be adapted.

Although the concept of the Blason can be applied to any verse form such as the sonnet or Blank Verse, the Blason often takes the form of octosyllabic or decasyllabic verse that ends with an epigraphic conclusion.

The Blason is often
• framed at the discretion of the poet, although lines are often syllabic, 8 or 10 syllables long.
• composed with a list of different images of the same thing with accompanying metaphors.
• written with a sharp conclusion.”

Blason: poetscollective.org

“Threat”

She raises her foot to meet his sharp gaze
yet her trust fails to see the looming threat

She fails to see the support underground
people wish well, but fear the bayonet

His manner spells danger, he’ll get his way
pretends to kiss, wants to intimidate

she has time to loosen his deathly grip
jump out, be rescued rather than regret

© Reena Saxena

This week, I’ve asked Reena Saxena to choose the photo prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your image (with credits) to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 August Specific Form: Yvette

💚 August Photo Prompt: Reena

💛 July Theme Prompt: Harmony

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!