#TankaTuesday Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 243, #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Are you ready to choose some syllables to use in your syllabic poetry this week? Ruth, from RuthKlein’s Scribbles, selected your two words:

Family & Peace

On the Monday recap, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme. For this poetry challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the cheatsheet OR from the forms found on Poetscollective.org.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

Sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

The RULES

Write a poem by finding synonyms for the two words above. Don’t use the two words! You can craft a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheatsheet OR from Poetscollective.org. It’s time for us to branch out! BE creative and try new forms. Make sure you follow the directions on how to write the form. Don’t forget to tell us what form you chose.

Post it on your blog.

Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).

Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

Don't forget

If you add hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on social media:

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the form you wrote in the title.

Jules and I are excited to share the cover of the First Edition of Word Weaving, a Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse. The Kindle copy will be available for preorder on September 1, 2021, for delivery on October 1st, 2021. The print edition will release October 1, 2021. The proceeds from this journal will go to fund a Poetry Contest on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry to be announced at a later date. PRE-ORDER HERE.

Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 242 | Poet’s Choice

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was everyone’s favorite: Poet’s Choice! I asked you to write your poetry using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chĹŤka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org. As a bonus, I included the option to write freestyle poetry as long as you added one syllabic form with your poem.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena8.ladyleemanila15.theindieshe
2.anita dawes9.Jude16.Goutam Dutta
3.Cheryl10.willowdot2117.Colleen Chesebro
4.Laura McHarrie11.Annette Rochelle Aben18.D.G. Kaye
5.Jules12.Balroop Singh19.Sally Cronin
6.Donna Matthews13.Gwen Plano20.You’re next!
7.The Versesmith14.Christine  

What a fabulous collection of poetry! There is something here for everyone! Thanks for loving this syllabic poetry as much as I do. I appreciate all of you. ❤

Jules and I are excited to share the cover of the First Edition of Word Weaving, a Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse. The Kindle copy will be available for preorder on September 1, 2021, for delivery on October 1st, 2021. The print edition will release October 1, 2021. The proceeds from this journal will go to fund a Poetry Contest on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry to be announced at a later date. ❤

Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TANKATUESDAY WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 240, #THEMEPROMPT

I’m moving away from FaceBook Pages because WordPress doesn’t share my posts there anymore. Instead, I’ve created a Twitter account for Word Craft: Prose & Poetry. Please follow @SyllabicPoetry where I will start sharing your posts this week. The Facebook page will be deleted in the next day or so. Thanks. ❤

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the fourth week of the month! Are you ready for a theme prompt? Vashti Quiroz-Vega, from last month’s challenge, picked the theme. I’m excited about this one… it’s something we’ve never done before!

This month’s theme is:

LULLABY

On the Monday before the next challenge, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet:

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

sodacoffee.com/syllables

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheat sheet OR from the Poetscollective.org. It’s time for us to branch out! BE creative and try new forms. Make sure you follow the directions on how to write the form. It’s always fun to share how to write the write the form so we can all learn together. Remember… we are still working with syllabic poetry forms.
  • Post it on your blog. Make sure to tell us the name of the form you’ve used so we don’t have to guess.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY on @SyllabicPoetry

If you add hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) we can find your poetry on social media.

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the name of the form you created in the title of your post.

Now, have fun and write some syllabic poetry!


#TANKATUESDAY #POETRY STARS | #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. As I’m moving away from FaceBook Pages, I’ve created a Twitter account for Word Craft: Prose & Poetry. Please follow @SyllabicPoetry where I will start sharing your posts this week. The Facebook page will be deleted in the next day or so. Thanks. ❤

This week’s challenge was to craft a syllabic poem, inspired by the photo below, using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org.

Cheryl shared the image this week, and it was popular! There is so much magic in this photo. I’m going to share a few of the poets who created extraordinary poems using different forms and combinations of forms. The shorter forms are as powerful as the longer forms. It all comes down to word choice and how you express your thoughts. Like a short story, poetry can tell a story.

Jude

Sangeetha: Mindfills

Jules

Dorinda: Night Owl Poetry

Ruth Scribbles

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.willowdot21 9.Jules 17.anita dawes 
2.Reena Saxena 10.Elizabeth 18.Dorinda Duclos 
3.Jude 11.Tricia Heriz- Smith 19.Sally Cronin 
4.Anisha 12.M J Mallon 20.kittysverses 
5.Eugenia 13.Annette Rochelle Aben 21.Merril D. Smith 
6.Sangeetha 14.Pat R 22.Colleen Chesebro 
7.D. L. Finn 15.Ruth Klein’s Scribbles 23.You’re next!
8.Brenda at Friendly Fairy Tales 16.Balroop Singh   

You all have outdone yourselves! Thank you for inspiring me every week with your poetic verses. I’m thrilled at your creativity. ❤

I chose Merril D. Smith’s Crapsey cinquain series: Star-Storied to feature this week. I found this longer form Crapsey cinquain series to read like a mythical story told in verse almost like a Ballad. Each stanza moves the tale forward—all inspired by a single photo! Who thought the Crapsey cinquain could give you these results? It pays to experiment with those simpler forms we’ve been crafting for years. Give it a try!

"Star-Storied"

Picture—
storm-chased seas, waves
in white-foamed roiling crash
against the small trireme, fortunes
plumet.

Behold–
a tale unfolds,
ocean-dark legends, gods
and mortals interlocked, love lost
and found.

Slay now,
the snake-haired beast,
though she blood-births magic–
this winged-horse, muse-beloved, soars
skyward.

Listen–
and hear beyond
ancient, echoed voices,
flashes of ghost-light memory
linger–

each pulse,
part of time’s dust
in gleaming streams–glimmers
of what was, what is, what might be–
somewhere

a place
in time, circling
round, like a comet bound
for space, yet ensorcelling each
story.

© Merril D. Smith

This week, I’ve asked Merril D. Smith to choose the photo for next month’s Ekphrastic challenge. Please email your image to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TANKATUESDAY WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 234, #SYNONYMSONLY

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Welcome! I’ve got great news. I think it’s time we spread our poetry wings! From now on, you can write your syllabic poetry from one of the forms on the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet or from Poetscollective.org! That means you can write and create all different kinds of syllabic poetry for our challenges. If it’s got syllables to count, have fun! We’ll still use the prompts… but think of the possibilities! Be bold, be creative. Try new syllabic forms. Please share the form and how to write it on your post so we can all learn together.

While you’re here, please check out the authors & poets at the Tanka Tuesday Book Store. If you know of a book and or author to add to this list, let me know by email to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. ❤

It’s the second week of the month! Are you ready to choose some syllables to use in your syllabic poetry? TJS Sherman had the opportunity to choose synonyms this week. I didn’t hear from him, so sorry… you guys are stuck with me. No worries… I know how busy summer is and especially after Covid. Here are your two words:

Green & Morass

On the Monday recap, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s synonyms.

For this poetry challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the cheat sheet:

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

Sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

I don't get it

The “new” RULES

  • Write a poem using a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheatsheet OR from the Poetscollective.org. It’s time for us to branch out! BE creative and try new forms. Make sure you follow the directions on how to write the form. It’s always fun to share how to write the write the form so we can all learn together. Remember… we are still working with syllabic poetry forms.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

Don't forget

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on social media

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the name of the form you created in the title of your post.


SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN

The Word Weaving Poetry Journal is accepting entries of syllabic poetry. Learn more HERE. Submissions close Thursday, July 15, 2021.

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 81, ENCHANT & SHAPE, #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to Tanka Tuesday

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and by leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.


Opportunities for Poets

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Launched in 2005, Mookychick—an online publisher of fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and reviews—has evolved into a community forum for just about everything. Eclectic and inclusive, they aim to connect like minds of all varieties. From fashion to faith and everything beyond, upside-down, and in-between—Mookychick wants to know about it. The best way to get a sense of what they like is to read the magazine online.

Mookychick is published frequently, and since 2005 they’ve showcased over 600 regular contributors. Although they don’t pay authors, they promote poets and writers by publishing author profiles and sharing their work with a broad readership.

Authors of fiction may submit short stories up to 2,000 words in length. Mookychick also likes to publish flash fiction up to 500 words, and 50-word stories that are exactly 50 words (not including the title). Poets are also welcome to submit.

Mookychick publishes a wide variety of nonfiction. They like articles on personal matters of all types, articles on self-care, opinion pieces, and interviews. They also publish reviews of books, comics, games, music, and events. They usually prefer pieces that are at least 350 words in length, but they also publish photo essays with fewer words. They don’t impose a maximum word count because they want authors to write until they’re finished.

All submissions should include a third-person bio, and authors can choose to include a personal link and photo if they want. Mookychick likes to build each author an individual profile page.

They accept submissions from all types of people and aim to promote marginalized voices as often as they can. They prefer pieces on marginalized perspectives to be written by people who embody those perspectives.

Mookychick accepts submissions via email, not online or by post. They don’t accept previously published work, even if it only appeared on a personal blog or social media.

If you would like to learn more or submit to Mookychick, please visit their website at mookychick.co.uk.

~*~

From AuthorsPublish.com – Unnerving Magazine: Haunted are These Houses

They want Gothic fiction and poetry for this anthology, on the theme. They publish horror, dark science fiction (light), dark fantasy, crime, thriller, suspense, and dark literary, and lean strongly towards horror. See guidelines for editor preferences. They ask for non-exclusive print-on-demand rights for five years.
Deadline: 28 April 2018
Length: 400-6,000 words, up to 500 lines for poetry
Pay: $0.01/word for fiction, $0.012/line for poetry
Details here.

goals

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

I sponsor this challenge to help poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

hip hip hurray

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of SUNDAY, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I got this

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

 Great ideaI have also been sharing your poetry on my Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Please feel free to FOLLOW, LIKE, & SHARE from my page. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Life is likea cup of tea

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: ENCHANT & SHAPE

Have fun and write some poetry!

challenge accepted