WEEKLY POETRY CHALLENGE STARS | #Synonyms Only: Annette rochelle aben

It’s HOT in Arizona! How are you staying cool?

Welcome to this week’s poetry challenge stars! Jules picked some interesting words for us all to work with this week for our #SynonymsOnly challenge: Circled and Squared.

At first the words intimidated me… but not for long. Thesaurus.com listed plenty of words.

Circled synonyms: encircle, rotate, surround, loop, etc.

Squared synonyms: balance, fit in, jibe, fix, pay, buy, conform, etc.

Remember the idea behind the synonyms only challenge is not to use the prompt words. That is the challenge part. Search for synonyms on thesaurus.com to use in your poetry.

Thanks to everyone who took part! You did an outstanding job tackling those words. Here’s everyone who joined in courtesy of Mr. Linky:

1.kittysverses10.Kerfe Roig19.Sue Vincent
2.Padre11.Goutam Dutta20.Colleen Chesebro
3.Kim12.Jude21.Vashti Quiroz- Vega
4.Trent McDonald13.s. s.22.Sally Cronin
5.Elizabeth14.theindieshe23.Merril D. Smith
6.Jules15.Marsha Ingrao24.Linda Lee Lyberg
7.willowdot2116.Christine Bialczak
8.Annette Rochelle Aben17.anita dawes  
9.Traci Kenworth18.Donna Matthews  

I selected Annette Rochelle Aben to pick next month’s synonyms. I got a chuckle from her senryu. All the elements are there, irony, humor, and she chose an awkward moment in life making the human, not the world around them (the natural world) the subject of her poem. Excellent!

Congratulations, Annette Rochelle Aben, it’s your turn to pick the synonyms for next month’s #SynonymsOnly challenge. Please Email me your choice at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com before next month’s challenge.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

“Old Dog, New Tricks”

The troglodyte thought
I’ll give it a whirl, why not
Learn to disco dance

©2020 Annette Rochelle Aben

source: annetterochelleaben.wordpress.com

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

the permanence of henna ~ gogyohka | RIVRVLOGR

Source: the permanence of henna ~ gogyohka

Ken shares an amazing poem using a Gogyohka which is a five-line, untitled, Japanese poetic form. Unlike tanka (5/7/5/7/7 syllables), Gogyohka has no restrictions on length. (Wikipedia.org)

Here are the rules for this poem from Wikipedia.com:

Five rules of Gogyohka by Enta Kusakabe (1983)

  • Gogyohka is a new form of short poem that is based on the ancient Japanese Tanka and Kodai kayo.
  • Gogyohka has five lines but exceptionally may have four or six.
  • Each line of Gogyohka consists of one phrase with a line-break after each phrase or breath.
  • Gogyohka has no restraint on numbers of words or syllables.
  • The theme of Gogyohka is unrestricted.

the permanence of henna

the direction
of our inclinations
holds no pattern
carefree, the actions we take
the permanence of henna

©2020 Ken Gierke

I like this form. It’s unencumbered with few restrictions other than writing phrases in each line. It’s super creative!

Let me know in the comments if you would like to see this form added to our ever-growing list of accepted syllabic poetry forms.

Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday Recap: #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mention, No. 156, #PoetsChoice

The Countdown is on to the Winter Solstice! Are you ready?

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the Poet of the Week and the honorable mention poetry that spoke to me. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

I approve all comments and link-backs to my blog. If you are a regular visitor to my blog, your link shows up, even if I haven’t approved it. Don’t panic! I get to all comments when I can.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! Please visit the challenge post comments HERE, where you’ll find the links to everyone’s poetry along with many of the poems. Stop by and say hello! ❤

I will publish the Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone can grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

H. R. R. Gorman has kindly volunteered to update the Poet of the Week & Honorable Mention poetry from the weekly recap into the PDF Compilation that will be available around the middle of January 2020. If this works out, I will consider continuing the Recap and PDF for next year. I’ve received great feedback about the recap and how the comments have helped poets perfect their own poetry. I think this is a great way to share all the great poetry from the challenge.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week who has shared an exceptional message or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception. You may not feel the same way about my choice. That’s okay. Perception is different for all of us.

The Poet of the Week

This week, I’ve chosen Ken G. as the Poet of the Week for his triple Senryu Sequence below. I love how Ken explored the subject of his memories as a humorous, personal event. This poem resonates with us because we can relate to his experience.

Senryu poems do not explore human nature by looking outward at the natural world but makes the “human”, not the world around him, it’s subject.

The object of this form is to offer the image of a human in action, doing something relatable, familiar, ironic or even embarrassing. When writing Senryu, you could choose moments from your own life that have caused you, or others, to giggle.

Remember, Haiku and Senryu are written as personal snapshots in time. As the poet, you’re sharing your experience with the reader.

Haiku and Senryu have certain differences. The chart below will help you clarify:

“Rudderless,” #SenryuSequence

far from flawless,
my memories, homeless
in their wanderings

searching for details
in times no longer ageless,
leaving me helpless

formless, these thoughts
passing through my mind,
almost wordless

©2019 Ken Gierke.

Honorable Mention(s)

If you can learn to write good Haiku, you can write all of the other forms easily. This week, Traci Kenworth has earned an honorable mention for her Haiku.

In this seasonal activity, Haiku, Traci shares her experience in the first line, with “starry holiday.” In the second line, she plays off that mental image of a starry holiday by describing “sliced fruit and cinnamon sticks.” The third line is her pivot, where she shares something unexpected, “tossed on the table.”

That last line is your pivot. It should be an opposite thought or something totally unexpected. Traci’s Haiku does that.

Here’s another test for a great Haiku. Form a sentence with the first and second lines of the poem: Starry holiday, sliced fruit and cinnamon sticks.

Then, take the middle part of the poem and form a sentence with the middle and the last line: Sliced fruit and cinnamon sticks tossed on the table.

See how there are two thoughts – related but different in this poem? That’s how you can tell your words are magical!

“Stars & Fruit,” #Haiku

starry holiday
sliced fruit and cinnamon sticks
tossed on the table

©2019 Traci Kenworth

Remember, books make for good retail therapy! Help support our poets. Please check out the Tanka Tuesday Book Store HERE.

Are you a regular participant of this challenge with a poetry book for sale? Let me know in the comments. I’ll add your book to the list!

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 125#SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

DREAMING of Spring!

Here are your two words for this week:

Origin & Write

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! Except for the first challenge of the month ~ then, the poets get to choose their own words. ❤

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to add the poems from the submission forms to the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple

If it’s the first poetry challenge of the month, poets choose their own words. (Synonyms are not necessary). Otherwise, for the rest of the month, I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

After you’ve published your poem on your own blog, copy and paste your poem into the form below. Then, click the SUBMIT button. (WordPress limits me on the title names, so use the Key below to know what to fill in the blanks) This form generates an email to me.

Don’t forget to click SUBMIT.

By participating in this challenge, you agree to allow me to publish your poem in a 2019 PDF collection of poetry if you are selected as the Poet of the Week. This collection will be available in January 2020 as a free download from my site.

Please note: I will not retrieve your poetry from the pingbacks any longer – only from the submission form. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap please use the Submission Form. ❤

However, if you can’t get the submission form to work for you, email me at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com. Please list your name, Title & Type of poem, the web address of your poem, and your poem. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

Visit Robbie Cheadle’s POETRY SHARING GROUP on Facebook JOIN TODAY!

Robbie Cheadle has set up a public group on Facebook called: “Poetry Sharing Group.”  Please share each other’s poems to this group. I think this is a great way to share our work with other poets. Mind your manners. For every share, you must comment on another post in the group. Please click the link above to join this group. Remember, sharing is caring! Thank you. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 122

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

Valentine’s Day isn’t far off. This is your opportunity to write all that love poetry you’ve been saving. Go ahead… May the muse be with you. ❤

It’s the first challenge of the month which means poets get to choose their own words.

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to add the poems from the submission forms to the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple

If it’s the first poetry challenge of the month, poets choose their own words. (Synonyms are not necessary). Otherwise, for the rest of the month, I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

After you’ve published your poem on your own blog, copy and paste your poem into the form below. Then, click the SUBMIT button. (WordPress limits me on the title names, so use the Key below to know what to fill in the blanks) This form generates an email to me.

Don’t forget to hit SUBMIT.

By participating in this challenge, you agree to allow me to publish your poem in a 2019 PDF collection of poetry if you are selected as the Poet of the Week. This collection will be available in January 2020 as a free download from my site.

Please note: I will not retrieve your poetry from the pingbacks any longer – only from the submission form. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap please use the Submission Form. ❤

If you can’t get the submission form to work for you, email me at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com. Please list your name, Title & Type of poem, the web address of your poem, and your poem. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

Visit Robbie Cheadle’s POETRY SHARING GROUP on Facebook JOIN TODAY!

Robbie Cheadle has set up a public group on Facebook called: “Poetry Sharing Group.”  Please share each other’s poems to this group. I think this is a great way to share our work with other poets. Mind your manners. For every share, you must comment on another post in the group. Please click the link above to join this group. Remember, sharing is caring! Thank you. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 100, “Poet’s Choice of Words”

Help Me Celebrate our 100th Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge!

Thank you for your participation!

animaatjes-im-so-happy-127673

Fall is in the air here in the mountains of Colorado and I saw snow on the mountain peaks Sunday morning. It’s my favorite time of the year and today is our 100th poetry challenge. How cool is that?

As a special treat, I thought it would be fun for everyone to pick their own words this week. 


 

PLEASE NOTE: This challenge is for Tanka, Haiku, Senryu, Haibun, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

NotedPlease note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

I sponsor this challenge to help poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I got this

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

graphics-fairies-599829

I have also been sharing your poetry on my Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Please feel free to FOLLOW, LIKE, & SHARE from my page. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

tanka tuesday fall

Have fun and write some syllabic poetry!

challenge accepted