#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 284 – #SpecificForm: 4/11

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. Yvette selected this week’s challenge. We were to write our syllabic poem using the 4/11 syllabic form created by Gwen Plano.

I was so pleased to see so many of you embrace this form. It just goes to show that syllabic poetry doesn’t have to be difficult to write. Eleven lines, with four syllables per line, says so much!

Just a reminder… don’t forget to add your published post link to Mr. Linky! 💜💚💛

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena 10.kittysverses 19.Margaret 21 
2.ben Alexander 11.anita dawes 20.theindieshe 
3.Gwen Plano 12.Harmony Kent 21.Colleen Chesebro 
4.willowdot21 13.Yvette M Calleiro 22.Jude 
5.The Versesmith 14.Kerfe 23.Smitha 
6.Cheryl 15.Jules 24.Vashti Q. Vega 
7.Balroop Singh 16.Annette Rochelle Aben 25.You’re next!
8.Sylvia Cognac 17.Ruth Klein   
9.Selma 18.D. L. Finn   

This was a tough week to select only one poem. I loved all of them! There was so much creativity! I read them over and over. 💜

A special thank you to Harmony Kent and Annette Rochelle Aben for their help in tweeting and sharing all our posts on social media. I couldn’t do this without you guys. 🙏🏻 ❤️

Check out Smitha’s poetry, photography, and artwork!

If you’re looking for a photographic vacation (I was) then you must read Margaret’s poem and enjoy the photos.

I selected Jules’ poem, “Airy Wonderland,” to feature. I loved the idea of staring at the clouds as the shapes take on new meaning. Cloud dreaming is a summer adventure; and as summer slips away, remember to grab those moments. Soon, autumn will present itself and summer will be a distant memory.

"Airy Wonderland"

Captivating
In all my days
Those puffy clouds
Taking on shapes
Images from those
Storied fables
White rabbit in
A spruced waist vest
Waiting to take
Me through the sky
Captivating

© JP/dh

This week, I’ve asked Jules to choose the specific form she’d like to practice for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

September Specific Theme: Jules

August Photo Prompt: Reena

August Theme Prompt: Sarah

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

Summer Magic, #TankaTuesday, #SpecificForm

This week, I finally found the time to write my poem for #TankaTuesday. The bathrooms are now a finished project! We even found time yesterday, to the paint the bare wood around the bottom of the deck. We hope to put up some plastic trellis around the base before summer’s end.

It was Yvette’s choice this week. She selected a form created by Gwen Plano called the 4-11, which is eleven lines of four syllables each.

NOTE: https://sodacoffee.com/syllables, the syllable counter we’ve used for years, now displays a 404 error page. In the past, they revamped the site and changed the address. I’m not sure if that is the case this time. So, use the syllable counter at How Many Syllables: https://www.howmanysyllables.com/syllable_counter/. Be aware that How Many Syllables sometimes is off in the count. Double check your syllable count.

Summer Magic

Summer magic
still shines—grab it!
Dance with fireflies,
waltz with fairies,
tell ghost stories
around the fire...
bond together.
Autumn hovers
in the raindrops.
Remember the
summer magic.

© Colleen M. Chesebro

I can’t believe we’re half way through August! Before you know it, summer will be a distant memory. Spend these last weeks with your family, enjoying time together. It’s all so precious. 💜

Join me and learn how to write syllabic poetry! Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available in print and ebook versions on Amazon.com.

TankaTuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 284, 8/9/22, #SpecificForm: 4-11

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

Last month, I asked Yvette Calleiro to select a syllabic form for us to learn more about. Her choice was a form that Gwen Plano created, called the 4-11. You can find her 4-11 form HERE.

FAST FACTS

Gwen says the 4-11 is a stanza of eleven lines, four syllables each line. The beginning line also repeats as the last line. Here is Gwen’s example.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry?

READ THIS FIRST: How to craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

RhymeZone.com

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

  • Write your syllabic poem. Try not to use “ing” ending words to satisfy the word count.
  • Post it on your blog. Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL: https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink). You might have to delete your previous entry.
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

MR. LINKY BELOW

Follow the schedule listed below:

August Specific Form: Yvette

 August Photo Prompt: Reena

 August Theme Prompt: Sarah

Now, have fun and write some 4-11 poetry!

#TankaTuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge No. 283: #Tastetherainbow-“Chakra” Color Poetry

Hello everyone. Happy August! This week for #TankaTuesday, choose your own syllabic form and a chakra color to feature in your poem. If the form is from the #TankaTuesday cheat sheet, let us know so we know where to look for directions. If it’s a new form, share how to write it and where you found the instructions.

This week let’s add something special to our color poetry. I want you to concentrate on the Chakra colors, and select one of those to feature in your poem. What are the chakra colors?

Chakra Colors In Order

Let’s begin by looking at each of your chakras and their color correspondence in order:

Image Credit: https://7chakrastore.com/blogs/news/chakra-colors

Here is a link that will explain the chakra colors: https://www.chakra-anatomy.com/chakra-colors.html

Take a few minutes to reflect on the chakra colors. What color are you drawn to? When you picture the most vibrant color, what color do you see? What does it remind you of, what emotions do you associate with it, and how does it make you feel? Describe the impact this color has (on you and/or the world around you). What insights can you glean from this color and your interpretation of it?

Now write your poem… minding the rules of the form you chose.

💜 💜 💜

Color Meanings – The Power and Symbolism of Colors

Color Symbolism in Literature: What Do Colors Mean in Literature and Poetry?

Symbolism – Definition & Examples

💜 💜 💜

P.S. 🌈 Taste the Rainbow refers to colors. You do not have to write about a rainbow in your poem. Just include a color in your poem. 🌈


Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry—The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

*Write your poem and post it on your blog.

*USE sodacoffee.com/syllables to count your syllables. That way, we are all using the same syllable counter.

*Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).

*Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

*Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

*Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

*Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

Follow the schedule listed below:

Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 August Specific Form: Yvette

💚 August Photo Prompt: Reena

💛 August Theme Prompt: Sarah

Now, have fun and write some chakra color themed poetry!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 282, #ThemePrompt: “The Longest Day”

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Harmony Kent7.ben Alexander13.theindieshe
2.Reena Saxena8.I deleted Margaret’s extra link14.Margaret 21
3.willowdot219.D. L. Finn15.Mayuri Srivastava
4.Gwen Plano10.Annette Rochelle Aben16.Ruth Klein
5.Cheryl11.Jules17.Jane Aguiar
6.Sarah David12.Colleen Chesebro18.You’re next!

Whew! What a week! I’ve been working on some creative projects this week, so I’ve been extra busy. Our contractor should finish the last bathroom on Tuesday! I can’t wait for this chapter of home renovations to be over.

👉🏻 🥳 👉🏻 I came across this blog post by Ken Hume HERE about writing poetry with your whole life. This is a great read! Please stop by Ken’s blog and share your thoughts. 👏🏻

Harmony picked a tough theme this week. What did your longest day look like? This week, I went with Sarah David’s shadorma poem, “Solstice.” The summer solstice was my first thought on the theme of the longest day. I liked the flow of this poem. Sarah captures the essence of the summer solstice in so few words.

Solstice

summer’s breath
blistering sunrise
glowing still
long past day
simmering into sunset
lengthening shadows

© Sarah David

This week, I’ve asked Sarah David to choose the theme prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Upcoming Prompt Poets

Specific Form: Yvette

Photo: Reena

Theme: Sarah

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

“The Longest Day,” Arquain

This week for #TankaTuesday (click the link to join in the challenge) Harmony selected the theme of “the longest day.” I chose the Arquain form found on the Poetscollective.org.

The Arquain is written in three stanzas, with the following syllable count per stanza: 1, 2, 3, 4 for the first stanza. 5,7, 7, 5, for the second, with an end rhyme for the two seven syllable end words. The third stanza is 4, 3, 2, 1 syllables.

The Longest Day

white
hot pain
rips within
time is endless

I pant, I hold back—
my child longs to be set free
primal screams my only plea
I must stop the pain

life's water breaks
I push hard
he is
born

© Colleen M. Chesebro

My son was my longest birth… about six hours of labor. He weighed 9 lbs. 11 oz, and was almost 23 inches long. The old adage that you forget the pain of childbirth isn’t true. At least, it wasn’t for me.

It was literally the longest day of my life! LOL!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 281 | #PhotoPrompt, #Ekphrastic

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena7.Jules13.Ruth Klein
2.willowdot218.theindieshe14.D.G. Kaye
3.ben Alexander9.Yvette M Calleiro15.kittysverses
4.Gwen Plano10.Goutam Dutta16.Margaret 21
5.Balroop Singh11.Selma17.Mayuri Srivastava
6.The Versesmith12.Annette Rochelle Aben18.You’re next!

We’re almost at the end of our bathroom renovation. One more week… because of a cracked counter top which had to be replaced. By next weekend, we should be finished, fini, terminado, done!! I miss writing poetry! I am renovation’d out! It’s been a long year and a half of waiting for contractors, waiting for supplies, and waiting for it all to be over. If you’ve never done renovations, let me tell you, it’s messy, dirty, and hugely disruptive. We’re almost at the finish line!

Many thanks to all of you for writing syllabic poetry this week. I apologize for the time it took me to read and comment on your poems. On top of the renovations, we found another leak under the sink, and my Wi-Fi/computer had hiccups again! The plumber gets another call tomorrow, and I think I solved the issues with my Wi-Fi. Trouble shooting is a wonderful thing.

I want to thank Willow for providing the photo of the statue from St. Pancras station. Margaret, from FROM PYRENEES TO PENNINES shares more information about the statue and the station, which I found really interesting.

This statue inspired a wide range of poetry. I loved how everyone interpreted this piece of art differently. That’s important to your poetry and sharing what you see or feel is the whole idea behind Ekphrastic poetry.

Reena’s Blason poem really spoke to me. The form is interesting—a new form for me. Also, I detected some negative energy from the statue, as did a few other poets. (This was before I read Margaret’s informative post about the statue).

Reena’s poem is an excellent example of selecting the perfect form to portray the “spirit” of the statue.

Poetscollective.org states:

Blason is a genre of poetry committed to the praise or blame of something through the use of a series of images that support the theme. It is a variation of the ancient Catalogue Poem. From French heraldry, blason translates as “the codified description of a coat of arms” Originally French poet, Clement Marot, wrote a poem praising a woman by listing parts of her body with metaphors to compare with them. Parts of the female body became a recurring topic of the Blason and continues to be the focus, although other subjects could be adapted.

Although the concept of the Blason can be applied to any verse form such as the sonnet or Blank Verse, the Blason often takes the form of octosyllabic or decasyllabic verse that ends with an epigraphic conclusion.

The Blason is often
• framed at the discretion of the poet, although lines are often syllabic, 8 or 10 syllables long.
• composed with a list of different images of the same thing with accompanying metaphors.
• written with a sharp conclusion.”

Blason: poetscollective.org

“Threat”

She raises her foot to meet his sharp gaze
yet her trust fails to see the looming threat

She fails to see the support underground
people wish well, but fear the bayonet

His manner spells danger, he’ll get his way
pretends to kiss, wants to intimidate

she has time to loosen his deathly grip
jump out, be rescued rather than regret

© Reena Saxena

This week, I’ve asked Reena Saxena to choose the photo prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your image (with credits) to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 August Specific Form: Yvette

💚 August Photo Prompt: Reena

💛 July Theme Prompt: Harmony

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 281, 7/19/22 #Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

This challenge explores Ekphrastic poetry, inspired by visual art or photographs. Willow provided the photo for this month’s challenge. Now, we can see this is a statue, so get creative and think about what this statue could represent. Think about imagery and symbolism… then select a form and craft your poem!

© Willow Willers

Write your poem using a syllabic form from the cheat sheet or from the poetscollective.org/poetryforms. Here is more information on how to write an Ekphrastic poem: How Do You Write an Ekphrastic Poem.

“Ekphrastic poems exist to respond to a piece of art critically, analytically, and reverentially.”

Ekphrastic poetry explained

On the Monday before the next challenge, I will select a poem from this week’s challenge to feature on the Monday recap. That poet will then choose the piece of artwork or a photograph (credits included) for next month’s challenge! Email your selection to me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com, a week before the challenge. Thank you.


Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

THE RULES

  • Write your choice of syllabic poem from the cheat sheet or from the poetscollective.org/poetryforms.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 August Specific Form: Yvette

💚 July Photo Prompt: Willow

💛 July Theme Prompt: Harmony

So, who wants to have fun and write some poetry?


“Prosper,” lanterne series

The #TankaTuesday challenge this week was to write a lanterne poem series. This is shape poetry and looks best centered on the page. It’s a cinquain (five lines) which comprises syllables of 1, 2, 3, 4, 1. I didn’t care for the structure of the lanterne given by Antonia Sorin, so I let the words flow. In this piece, the verbs serve a purpose and the stanzas flow more purposefully into something more meaningful. The title echoes the meaning of the poem.

Prosper

look
within—
clear your heart
embrace your truth
see

hark
tune in—
take notice
focus on sounds
hear

breathe
inhale—
deep exhale
open your mind
smell

sense
perceive—
get in touch
with your true self
live

© Colleen M. Chesebro

Listen to Rebecca Budd recite one of my poems from Word Weaving, A Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse:

🏅Announcing the Winners of the Word Craft Poetry Syllabic Poetry Contest 🏅

I’m thrilled to announce the winners of the Word Craft Poetry Syllabic Poetry Contest held to honor the Summer Solstice. The theme was dreams, and the syllabic form to write was tanka prose. Many thanks to all the poets who entered this contest. Thanks for being part of our poetry community.

Last year, JulesPaige and I sponsored the first Word Weaving Poetry Journal. As promised, the royalties from the sale of the journal from 2021 went toward three prizes of $35.00 for 1st place, $25.00 for 2nd place, and $15.00 for third place paid in U.S. funds through PayPal. There was also one honorable mention the judges felt warranted recognition.

These winners will receive a blog widget to show off their poetic expertise. I hope they will link back to this post when they share the widget on their blog. I will notify the winners by email to plan for payment.

The first place winner of $35.00 is:

“Am I Dreaming,” by D. Wallace Peach

Tell me, am I dreaming? For moon-eyed owls fold their wings on the limbs outside my window, and heart-shaped stars flutter like moths beneath a tarnished silver sky. At the forest’s edge, gypsies serenade us with prayers to our bald mountain gods. I want to wake you, so we might join their song, but I drift in the between-time of a summer’s early morn. Am I dreaming? For the scent of you bathes my skin through sheets worn soft with age. Your breath dews my neck with sleeping sweetness. Will you reply if I speak your name into the shadows of our room? I’m afraid to stir lest your spirit slips away.

on the cusp of dawn
I await your soul’s embrace
drift into my dreams
balm to a widow’s sorrow
let me sleep for an hour more

Judges Comments:

With multi-sensory images, this piece maintained a sense of dreaminess from beginning to end. The beautiful prose reaches the heart while reading, with details about the narrator/narrative exquisitely and subtly revealed through the prose and the poem; “For the scent of you bathes my skin through sheets worn soft with age”; “drift into my dreams balm to a widow’s sorrow”. 

Congratulations on a moving tanka prose that is both peaceful and poignant.


The Second Place winner of $25.00 is:

“Visions of Longed For Relief,” by Ken Gierke

Upon waking, I often struggle to remember my dreams, wonder what they held, the meanings my mind assigns to them even as it places them behind a veil of mystery. But on this one night, something is different.

Classical music, a collection by Edvard Grieg that includes movements from Peer Gynt Suite, plays through the speakers in my bedroom. As the first four movements play, I dream, waking as each piece ends, aware that the tone of each dream is set by the music of that moment.

Musical notes flow through my mother’s body as I care for her to the sound of Grieg’s Piano Concerto in A minor. Waking briefly, then falling back asleep, I feel my concern for her eased by the melody of Morning Mood. I wake once again to hear the start of The Death of Asa. Lulled to sleep by the somber tones of the movement, my dream turns dark and I feel as though facing an impending doom. I wake, troubled, only to fall asleep once more, this time to the light sounds of Anitra’s Dance. It is as if light, or life perhaps, is rising up to push back the darkness that had insinuated itself.

heat reaches new heights
as sun approaches apex
breeze off the water
tempers the sun’s oppression
visions of longed-for relief

Judges Comments:

An intriguing, almost haunting tanka prose piece, there is indeed “a veil of mystery,” but “on this one night something is different.” Music and mood are intertwined and ultimately this dreaming helps the narrator realize peace as he/she takes care of their mother. They also intertwined dark and light into this piece that beautifully conveys the stress and strain and the desire for relief both caregiver and cared for must feel in this situation. It too is resolved with peace and poignancy and tells an important story while sticking to the theme of dreaming in tanka prose.


The third place winner of $15.00 is:

“Between & Beyond,” by Merril D. Smith

There are journeys beyond the boundaries of the known. Brief moments, when our minds travel to a liminal place between the worlds of what is and what might be. Here I saw my parents—young and in love. Then, I saw them older and still together, as they were not in real life. The air around them glimmered and glowed. In the way of dreams, we sensed each other. They smiled, and I woke–at peace, but wondering if it was merely a dream.

moon’s silvered secrets—
wind-strum whispers, shimmer-slide
in time between breaths
I almost hear the stars sing
chimes of possibility

Judges Comments:

“In the way of dreams…” This was another personal narrative in which a dream, vividly shared, might be more than a dream. The “moon’s silvered secrets” imply that this dream was indeed a journey “beyond the boundaries of the known”, a message of “what might be”. The pivot line is well crafted, the tanka standing strong on its own while continuing the dreamy peaceful feeling of the prose.


An Honorable Mention went to:

“Finding the Way,” by Jude Itakali

It’s drizzling this morning, like it did yesterday and the day before. I skid along the mucky path to the cyclist stage. All neighbours have abandoned it for a longer, more sure-footed way. I alone dare to pass here. In a sense, at least for now, this path is mine, and I have little of that to get on with.

not for gasp nor gaze
these wild lantanas blossom
yet ensnare senses
for scent or defiant growth
no drifter can pass aloof

In days passed, I’d moan the squelch of a favourite shoe as it sank into disguised patches of mud. I’d curse those cunning patches, for like all else in this world, they’d have betrayed me. But things are different now. I see what I could not before. I feel what I feared to feel. For I have clutched at straws my entire life, to find this dream that fits like a glove.

These dreary mornings mask the sunrise glimmering in my heart and mind. But still I skip along this path in a whimsical daze; two points for sure-footing, one less per slippy slip. Nothing will douse my spirits now. There is beauty everywhere. There is hope.

what is a soul's dance
but joy's perpetuity
the kiss of purpose
to live a hypnotic life
dreaming up reality

Judge’s Comments:

“Finding the Way” found its way to an honorable mention. Written in first person, as tanka prose should be, the theme is woven throughout, with a clear and strong conclusion in the second tanka that summarizes the narrator’s growth along their muddy path. Even with “dreary mornings (that) mask the sunrise glimmering in my heart and mind,” the tone is one of hope and dreams for the future. This entry was much discussed and we would feel remiss in not congratulating you here for your take on the theme.


Meet the Judges

D. Slayton Avery, recently retired from teaching, now works at playing with words. D. Slayton Avery’s fiction and poetry is published in a number of online and print journals and anthologies— Boston Literary Magazine, The Hopper, Enchanted Conversations, and Santa Barbara Literary Journal, among others. She is a regular contributor at Carrot Ranch Literary Community and has two books of poetry, Chicken Shift and For the Girls, and a collection of flash fiction, After Ever, Little Stories for Grown Children. D.’s prose and poetry can be sampled at https://shiftnshake.wordpress.com/.

Lisa Fox enjoys a laissez-faire lifestyle near Lake Michigan after years of government work. She’s earned a couple of pieces of paper from uni. She’s studied philosophical daoism. She currently writes poetry and flash fiction at her WordPress blog, https://tao-talk.com/. Favorite past-times are reading, writing, listening to music, gardening and observing nature for advice, bicycling, and spending time with her adult sons.