#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 243 | Synonyms Only: “Family & Peace”

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. Many thanks to Ruth Klein’s Scribbles for choosing the words this week. This week’s challenge was to choose synonyms for the words, “family & peace,” using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.ladyleemanila7.Gwen Plano13.D.G. Kaye
2.Selma8.Jules14.Jude
3.willowdot219.Kerfe15.theindieshe
4.Annette Rochelle Aben10.Kevin Harp16.Sally Cronin
5.Cheryl11.Frank J. Tassone17.Jane Aguiar
6.Ruth Klein12.anita dawes 18. YOU’RE NEXT

Wow! There was so much great poetry this week using synonyms for the words, family and peace. Plenty of new forms to try, as well!

I especially liked the words quietude and blended brood from Annette Rochelle Aben’s Abhanga poem. Ruth Klein used kinfolk, genetics, and truce. These are only some examples. You’ll want to read the other poems to see how creative synonyms can be.

Why do we choose synonyms for the words? Because it forces us to select words with a deeper meaning. When we write syllabic poetry, we want to convey our message so that we connect with our readers. If we’d only used the words family and peace, we would all have poetry that sounded the same, with the same meaning. It’s a great way to spice up your poetry.

This week, I chose Willow Willers to choose the words for next month’s #SynonymsOnly challenge. I especially like the message in her Etheree this week. Although Etheree poems are not meant to rhyme, sometimes the words just come out of us that way.

we
bluster
and bemoan
the shortcomings
of extended clans
while calming the waters
others raise fires with their fans.
will things come to a bloody pass?
or tranquility encompass us?
and so relations we will be, war free

© Willow Willers

This week, I’ve asked Willow Willers to choose the prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Jules and I are excited to share the cover of the First Edition of Word Weaving, a Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse. The Kindle copy will be available for preorder on September 1, 2021, for delivery on October 1st, 2021. The print edition will release October 1, 2021. The proceeds from this journal will go to fund a Poetry Contest on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry to be announced at a later date. Click HERE to preorder.

Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 242 | Poet’s Choice

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was everyone’s favorite: Poet’s Choice! I asked you to write your poetry using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org. As a bonus, I included the option to write freestyle poetry as long as you added one syllabic form with your poem.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena8.ladyleemanila15.theindieshe
2.anita dawes9.Jude16.Goutam Dutta
3.Cheryl10.willowdot2117.Colleen Chesebro
4.Laura McHarrie11.Annette Rochelle Aben18.D.G. Kaye
5.Jules12.Balroop Singh19.Sally Cronin
6.Donna Matthews13.Gwen Plano20.You’re next!
7.The Versesmith14.Christine  

What a fabulous collection of poetry! There is something here for everyone! Thanks for loving this syllabic poetry as much as I do. I appreciate all of you. ❤

Jules and I are excited to share the cover of the First Edition of Word Weaving, a Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse. The Kindle copy will be available for preorder on September 1, 2021, for delivery on October 1st, 2021. The print edition will release October 1, 2021. The proceeds from this journal will go to fund a Poetry Contest on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry to be announced at a later date. ❤

Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

D.G.Kaye’s Sunday Book Review – Word Craft: Prose & Poetry by Colleen Chesebro

D.G. Kaye wrote a lovely review for Word Craft: Prose & Poetry. I’d appreciate it if you stop by and read the rest of the review. Please share. Thank you.

My 5 Star Review:

If you’re a lover of poetry and are interested in learning how to write syllabic poetry, or even just as a reader to discover all that’s involved in writing in the various styles of syllabic poetry, this is the book for you. Yes, there are plenty of books written on the subject for sure, but this author has a gift of born ‘teaching’. Her tutorials on how to, as well as great direction in explanations and wonderful use of examples allow us to clearly see what the author is explaining.

Syllabic poetry encompasses various styles and syllabic counts with succinct descriptions, from both the English and Japanese style of writing Haiku. The author explains the differences in syllabic counts to various versions of Haiku, as well as teaching us the difference between poetic prose which requires no syllabic count, such as Gogyolka or Tanka Prose. We’ll also learn about many of the various forms of Haiku and Tanka with Haibun, which styles are written from a personal point of view, and writing about nature.

READ MORE…

I’ve done the work of researching these syllabic forms for you. Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available as an Ebook and a Print book. mybook.to/WordCraftProsePoetry Let’s write syllabic poetry together! ❤

How to Start Crafting Syllabic Poetry

Are you new to crafting syllabic poetry and don’t know how to start? Let me show you two syllabic poetry forms to get you started on your poetry writing journey now…

Let’s start with an American form, the Crapsey Cinquain. The Crapsey Cinquain is a five-line, non-rhyming poem featuring a syllable structure of 2-4-6-8-2. Choose words that create drama that builds into the fourth line. The turn occurs on line five, the most important line. This is where you change your focus away from the drama in some interesting way. Cinquain poems need a title.

Use a syllable counter as you compose your poetry. I use sodacoffee.com/syllables/. See my example below:

"Day Dawns"

pink blush—
fairy sunshine
smudges morning's gray clouds
dew sparkles against the grasses
thunder

© Colleen M. Chesebro

In the Crapsey cinquain above, I described a morning sunrise. True to the form, I pivoted in line five. My last two-syllables are where I turned away from the beauty of the scene and added the word “thunder.” This gives a hint that not everything is as it seems in the idyllic scene I described.

LEARN more about the Crapsey cinquain form at cinquain.org.


If Japanese poetry intrigues you, start with the haiku. Haiku contains three lines following the short-long-short, 3-5-3, 2-3-2, (5-7-5 traditional) syllable count. Your haiku should contain approximately twelve syllables. We write haiku about nature, the seasons, a beautiful moment in nature, an emotional experience while in nature, or change. Haiku are untitled. The use of a Kigo (season word) is optional. Haiku do not rhyme. Do not use metaphors or similes in haiku.

(When you’re first learning how to write haiku, use the 5-7-5 syllable structure until you’re ready to embrace the shorter formats.)

When we write haiku, we’re sharing an encounter between nature and ourself as a human. We describe our experience at that exact moment. These are the moments that stand out and grab our attention in unexpected ways.

clouds stitched together
against the blue cloth of sky
summer's heat rises

© Colleen M. Chesebro

In the haiku above, I describe the clouds, and how they look against a blue sky. Notice my choice of words. I also used a kigo or season word, which is summer. Now, you’re experiencing the moment with me…

Break your haiku into two separate word images:

clouds stitched together against the blue cloth of sky

against the blue cloth of sky summer’s heat rises

This is a great way to check your haiku when you’ve finished writing. Combine the first and second line of your haiku. Does a mental image appear? In this example, you can see the clouds contrast the color of the blue sky. Remember the brevity of words.

However, when you take the second and third line and combine them, you receive another mental image. Now you see the heat shimmers against the blue sky.

The idea is to write about two contrasting or somehow similar images, and to connect them in unusual ways. Haiku are all about images. How does the haiku make you feel? Have you created emotion without telling your reader how to feel?

That’s it! You’re ready to craft syllabic poetry. Join us every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for Tanka Tuesday and get your poetry writing groove on!

I’ve done the work of researching these syllabic forms for you. Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available as an Ebook and a Print book. mybook.to/WordCraftProsePoetry Let’s write syllabic poetry together! ❤

#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 241, #SPECIFICFORM: Tanka Prose

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the fifth Tuesday of the month! This is our chance to work with a specific syllabic poetry form. Take this opportunity to learn more about the particular form.

This week’s form is:

tanka prose

Here’s a quick review of the tanka prose form:

We typically write tanka prose in the 5-7-5-7-7 or a s/l/s/l/l five-line syllabic structure. Tanka prose should contain a title. There is one basic requirement in writing tanka prose: one paragraph, and one tanka.

There are two basic forms in classic tanka prose: Preface (explanation) and the Poem Tale (episodic narration). Tanka prose does not rhyme.

Preface (explanation): Is where the prose explains the basic information in the narrowest sense. It is a factual summary of the experience. Usually you write one prose paragraph and one tanka.

Poem Tale (episodic narration): The poem tale/episodic narration is a more formal structure where you share a more personal experience through your prose. In general, the tanka poem is always the center around which the narrative episode (prose) comes from. Write your tanka first. With this type of tanka prose, the prose often shares a beginning, middle, and an end, as if it were a short story. You can have one or more tanka within the prose.

Read & Download: The PDF by Woodward-The Elements of Tanka Prose

Refer to Word Craft: Prose & Poetry, chapter Eight: Tanka Prose in English: https://amzn.to/2V0awOp

For this #TankaTuesday Poetry Challenge, write a tanka prose poem, either as a “preface” or a “episodic narration.”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a tanka prose poem.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL: https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink). You might have to delete your previous entry.
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY on @SyllabicPoetry

If you add hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) we can find your poetry on social media.

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the name of the form you created in the title of your post.

Now, have fun and write some tanka prose poetry!


#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars | #ThemePrompt: Lullaby

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write your syllabic poem using the theme of lullaby using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.willowdot218.Cheryl15.s. s.
2.Padre9.Tina Stewart Brakebill16.Sally Cronin
3.Jude10.D. L. Finn17.theindieshe
4.Reena Saxena11.Jules18.Ruth Klein
5.Selma12.Colleen Chesebro19.anita dawes
6.Marsha13.Donna Matthews20.anita dawes
7.Eugenia14.Gwen Plano21.
kittysverses

What a fun week. I enjoyed all the different poetry dedicated to the theme of “lullaby” selected by Vashti Q. Vega. Make sure you check out the links above. There are so many poems I loved that I had a hard time choosing. I think I’m in an Autumn frame of mind. This week, I’d like to feature Franci Hoffman’s nonet poem, “Secrets.” I liked the comparison she made between secrets and the falling amber leaves sounding like a lullaby of whispers in the trees. There is beautiful imagery in her words. ❤

"Secrets"

secrets awakened by an autumn breeze
their lullaby once a safe haven
rise up as whispers in the trees
drifting hither and yonder
morphing as amber leaves
falling to the ground
renewing cause
secrets heard
loud and
clear

© Franci Hoffman

This week, I’ve asked Franci Hoffman from Eugi’s Causerie to choose the theme prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Jules and I are excited to share the cover of the First Edition of Word Weaving, a Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse. The Kindle copy will be available for preorder on September 1, 2021, for delivery on October 1st, 2021. The print edition will release October 1, 2021. The proceeds from this journal will go to fund a Poetry Contest on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry to be announced at a later date. ❤

Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TANKATUESDAY WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 240, #THEMEPROMPT

I’m moving away from FaceBook Pages because WordPress doesn’t share my posts there anymore. Instead, I’ve created a Twitter account for Word Craft: Prose & Poetry. Please follow @SyllabicPoetry where I will start sharing your posts this week. The Facebook page will be deleted in the next day or so. Thanks. ❤

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the fourth week of the month! Are you ready for a theme prompt? Vashti Quiroz-Vega, from last month’s challenge, picked the theme. I’m excited about this one… it’s something we’ve never done before!

This month’s theme is:

LULLABY

On the Monday before the next challenge, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet:

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

sodacoffee.com/syllables

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheat sheet OR from the Poetscollective.org. It’s time for us to branch out! BE creative and try new forms. Make sure you follow the directions on how to write the form. It’s always fun to share how to write the write the form so we can all learn together. Remember… we are still working with syllabic poetry forms.
  • Post it on your blog. Make sure to tell us the name of the form you’ve used so we don’t have to guess.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY on @SyllabicPoetry

If you add hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) we can find your poetry on social media.

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the name of the form you created in the title of your post.

Now, have fun and write some syllabic poetry!


#TANKATUESDAY #POETRY STARS | #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. As I’m moving away from FaceBook Pages, I’ve created a Twitter account for Word Craft: Prose & Poetry. Please follow @SyllabicPoetry where I will start sharing your posts this week. The Facebook page will be deleted in the next day or so. Thanks. ❤

This week’s challenge was to craft a syllabic poem, inspired by the photo below, using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org.

Cheryl shared the image this week, and it was popular! There is so much magic in this photo. I’m going to share a few of the poets who created extraordinary poems using different forms and combinations of forms. The shorter forms are as powerful as the longer forms. It all comes down to word choice and how you express your thoughts. Like a short story, poetry can tell a story.

Jude

Sangeetha: Mindfills

Jules

Dorinda: Night Owl Poetry

Ruth Scribbles

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.willowdot21 9.Jules 17.anita dawes 
2.Reena Saxena 10.Elizabeth 18.Dorinda Duclos 
3.Jude 11.Tricia Heriz- Smith 19.Sally Cronin 
4.Anisha 12.M J Mallon 20.kittysverses 
5.Eugenia 13.Annette Rochelle Aben 21.Merril D. Smith 
6.Sangeetha 14.Pat R 22.Colleen Chesebro 
7.D. L. Finn 15.Ruth Klein’s Scribbles 23.You’re next!
8.Brenda at Friendly Fairy Tales 16.Balroop Singh   

You all have outdone yourselves! Thank you for inspiring me every week with your poetic verses. I’m thrilled at your creativity. ❤

I chose Merril D. Smith’s Crapsey cinquain series: Star-Storied to feature this week. I found this longer form Crapsey cinquain series to read like a mythical story told in verse almost like a Ballad. Each stanza moves the tale forward—all inspired by a single photo! Who thought the Crapsey cinquain could give you these results? It pays to experiment with those simpler forms we’ve been crafting for years. Give it a try!

"Star-Storied"

Picture—
storm-chased seas, waves
in white-foamed roiling crash
against the small trireme, fortunes
plumet.

Behold–
a tale unfolds,
ocean-dark legends, gods
and mortals interlocked, love lost
and found.

Slay now,
the snake-haired beast,
though she blood-births magic–
this winged-horse, muse-beloved, soars
skyward.

Listen–
and hear beyond
ancient, echoed voices,
flashes of ghost-light memory
linger–

each pulse,
part of time’s dust
in gleaming streams–glimmers
of what was, what is, what might be–
somewhere

a place
in time, circling
round, like a comet bound
for space, yet ensorcelling each
story.

© Merril D. Smith

This week, I’ve asked Merril D. Smith to choose the photo for next month’s Ekphrastic challenge. Please email your image to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TANKA TUESDAY WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 238, #SYNONYMSONLY

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Welcome! Check out the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Book Store where you can find links to some of the challenge poet’s Amazon Author Pages. If you have a book you would like to have added, let me know in the comments. ❤

It’s the second week of the month! Are you ready to choose some syllables to use in your poetry? Selma from last month’s challenge had the opportunity to choose the two words for this month. I didn’t hear from her, so I selected your two words:

Sanctuary & Follow

On the Monday recap, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme. For this poetry challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the cheatsheet OR from the forms found on Poetscollective.org.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

Sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

I don't get it

The RULES

Write a poem using a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheatsheet OR from Poetscollective.org. It’s time for us to branch out! BE creative and try new forms. Make sure you follow the directions on how to write the form. Don’t forget to tell us what form you chose.

Post it on your blog.

Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).

Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

Don't forget

If you add hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on social media:

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the form you wrote in the title.


SUBMISSIONS ARE CLOSED

The Word Weaving Poetry Journal is closed. The first edition will publish October 1, 2021.

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


#TANKATUESDAY #POETRY STARS | Poets choice No. 237

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to write your poem using haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org. Now, the first of the month challenge also includes prose poetry and freestyle poetry!

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena9.Tina Stewart Brakebill17.kittysverses
2.Jude10.anita dawes18.Elizabeth
3.willowdot2111.Marsha19.Ruth Klein’s Scribbles
4.D. L. Finn12.Colleen Chesebro20.Kerfe Roig
5.Donna Matthews13.Cheryl21.Sally Cronin
6.Jules14.Gwen Plano22.Annette Rochelle Aben
7.Myrna Migala15.Jaye23.Crazy Nerds
8.ladyleemanila16.Balroop Singh  

I was excited to read your poetry this week. Remember, if you’re having a hard time finding inspiration, the poetry Oracle (magnetic poetry) might be enough to get you started on writing your poem. With the introduction of prose poetry and freestyle poetry, this first of the month challenge is now more inclusive to poets who find that syllabic poetry stifles their creativity. ❤

Submissions are now closed for the first edition of the wordweavingpoetryjournal.com. We will be sending out emails to the poets whose poetry was accepted. Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!