#ShareYourDay

Sophie, my writing muse <3

Okay, I’ve finally found a theme that works for me. Whew! WP definitely upgraded the editor again, because everything looks different in the post template. I also had to change my browser to Chrome. Not my favorite, but everything seems to be working on WP. Fingers Crossed!! Many thanks to David for his theme inspiration… the Libre2 theme is working. 🙏🏻 🌸

This week for #TankaTuesday, I’m sharing the spot where I do all my writing and creating. Sophie spends the day (and nights) with me most of the time. I’m not ashamed to say that I’m still in my jammies as it’s been another wintry day here in Michigan. I’m looking forward to spring!

a Michigan spring
feels almost the same as a
Michigan winter

©Colleen M. Chesebro
APRIL IS POETRY MONTH

Don’t forget to join in NaPoWritMo HERE

Senryu: Memories-Sweet & Sour

The theme for #TankaTuesday this week is memories: sweet & sour. Here is my senryu series.

Photo by Elina Sazonova on Pexels.com
a full glass of wine
uncorks old
fantasies of him

the sweetness
of watermelon—
memories

Parkinsons—
shaky endings of
memory

© Colleen M. Chesebro

“The Woman in Red,” tanka, senryu, Abhanga

The Crystal Ball is a charming painting from John William Waterhouse which features a plethora of influences from Renaissance architecture to British Pre-Raphaelites like Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais. ~ via John William Waterhouse

This week’s #TankaTuesday poetry challenge is an Ekphrastic challenge. Read the post HERE.

It thrilled me when my friend, Rebecca Budd, introduced me to her blog called Chasing Art. I’ve always been interested in art, and the different mediums an artist uses to interpret their creativity. She shared John Waterhouse’s works, and my mind lit up with the poetic possibilities!

Painting reminds me of syllabic poetry… we choose a form based on our inspiration and what we want to say or share. We paint with words as we express our stories.

The woman in this painting captivated me. I had so many questions. Here is my first epiphany, a tanka, told from the perspective of the woman in the painting:

in my solitude
I conjured the oracle
for future outcomes
the truth is now crystal clear
'he loves me not,' my lament

© Colleen M. Chesebro

But wait… I still had more questions to answer. How about a senryu?

crystal ball readings...
the lady's favorite game
she loves when she's right

© Colleen M. Chesebro

I think there is a story here… How about this double Abhanga? I think this might be the unspoken truth revealed:

deep inside her study
the young lady in red
weaves magic in her head
to pursue truth

the crystal ball foretells
the babe she carries low 
conceived by her old beau
her spouse will scorn

© Colleen M. Chesebro

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the #TankaTuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

Thanks for stopping by to read. <3

“Snow Blind,” senryu vs haiku

Photo by Margerretta on Pexels.com
luminous sunshine
snow reflections sparkle...
I'm blind as a bat

© Colleen M. Chesebro

While haiku are often stark and disciplined, senryu poems are often witty or funny. The senryu is a three-line (5-7-5, 3-5-3, 2-3-2 syllable) Japanese poetic form that focuses on human nature, including an ironic or darkly comedic edge. Some are witty, some are cynical, and some are satirical. Senryu do not require a kigo or kireji (pivot) like haiku.

In the senryu above, I describe an episode of snow blindness. Senryu do not need to feature nature like a haiku does. However, be careful your haiku doesn’t turn into a senryu with the addition of a witty or funny pivot at the end.

Here’s another example:

I hate hypocrites
and phonies, the worst culprits—
constant complainers

© Colleen M. Chesebro

#TANKATUESDAY #POETRY STARS | Poets choice No. 237

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to write your poem using haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org. Now, the first of the month challenge also includes prose poetry and freestyle poetry!

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena9.Tina Stewart Brakebill17.kittysverses
2.Jude10.anita dawes18.Elizabeth
3.willowdot2111.Marsha19.Ruth Klein’s Scribbles
4.D. L. Finn12.Colleen Chesebro20.Kerfe Roig
5.Donna Matthews13.Cheryl21.Sally Cronin
6.Jules14.Gwen Plano22.Annette Rochelle Aben
7.Myrna Migala15.Jaye23.Crazy Nerds
8.ladyleemanila16.Balroop Singh  

I was excited to read your poetry this week. Remember, if you’re having a hard time finding inspiration, the poetry Oracle (magnetic poetry) might be enough to get you started on writing your poem. With the introduction of prose poetry and freestyle poetry, this first of the month challenge is now more inclusive to poets who find that syllabic poetry stifles their creativity. <3

Submissions are now closed for the first edition of the wordweavingpoetryjournal.com. We will be sending out emails to the poets whose poetry was accepted. Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TANKATUESDAY #POETRY STARS | #ThemePrompt: Expedition

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to write your poetry using the theme of “expedition” chosen by Donna Matthews, using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org.

I have a bit of news I thought I’d share. Sometimes the universe drops unexpected gifts or opportunities on your doorstep that you can’t ignore. At least, that is how it was for me. I’ve accepted a part-time receptionist position at my local hair salon. Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would find a job that I could work at without impeding my own creative writing endeavors! It’s truly a gift!

With that being said, for the next couple of weeks, I’ll be working more hours in training than when the training ends. I’ll do my best to keep up with comments and approving linkbacks. Don’t panic if you don’t see your link back approved immediately. I’ll get there as soon as I can. <3

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Trent McDonald 9.Laura McHarrie 17.theindieshe 
2.Gwen Plano 10.D. L. Finn 18.Donna Matthews 
3.Jude 11.Marsha 19.Vashti Quiroz- Vega 
4.willowdot21 12.Annette Rochelle Aben 20.Anisha 
5.Eugenia 13.Elizabeth 21.Ruth Klein’s Scribbles 
6.The Versesmith 14.Selma 22.
7.Reena Saxena 15.Sally Cronin   
8.Jules 16.Kerfe Roig   

This week, Vashti Quiroz-Vega’s shadorma leaped off the page! How many of us are armchair travelers, connecting with exciting expeditions through reading? Me, me… I know I’m one!

This shadorma flows with the natural rhythm of her chosen words. I like that one of Emily Dickinson’s poems inspired Vashti to write this shadorma. It’s a great message and sums up the theme of an expedition taken through the reading of books.

"Expedition"

I opened
a book and entered.
The words spread
out their wings,
and took me on a journey
far from where I’ve been.

© Vashti Quiroz-Vega

This week, I’ve asked Vashti Quiroz-Vega to choose the prompt for next month’s theme challenge. Please email your choice of theme to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Submissions are now closed for the first edition of the wordweavingpoetryjournal.com. Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TANKATUESDAY #POETRY STARS | Poets choice

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to choose synonyms for the words, “loose and tight,” using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, & the Kerf poetry. The optional form instructions are here.

(There is no capitalization on the first word in each line of Japanese syllabic poetry. Most of the American forms do not use capitalization either. Why? Syllabic poetry is written in breathy phrases, not sentences).

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Anisha9.Cheryl17.Selma
2.Reena Saxena10.Jules18.Kerfe Roig
3.Elizabeth11.Donna Matthews19.Ruth Klein
4.Gwen Plano12.D. L. Finn20.s. s.
5.Linda Lee Lyberg13.Pat21.Vashti Quiroz- Vega
6.Eugenia14.anita dawes22.Sally Cronin
7.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr15.Jules #223.Annette Rochelle Aben
8.willowdot2116.Susan Joy Clark  

Poet’s choice is always so much fun! Congratulations to everyone! You all wrote magical poetry. I’m sharing poems that deserve a second read. Here are a few that caught my eye:

Susan Joy Clark shared an Arkquain Swirl.

Linda Lee Lyberg wrote a poignant haibun.

Pat’s haiku is a stunner.

Don’t forget to connect with the Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse at wordweavingpoetryjournal.com. Submissions are open until July 15, 2021, which is THIS Thursday! Have you submitted your poetry? At midnight, submissions close, so don’t be late!

This week, I tweeted much of your poetry on the Word Weaving Twitter account. Please follow Word Weaving @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY STARS – Specific Form: Create Your Own Syllabic Poetry Form

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. It’s the fifth Tuesday of the month! This is our chance to work with a specific syllabic poetry form. But let’s do something different this time…

  • First, choose your favorite syllabic poetry form. Write your poem.
  • Next, give your poem some different characteristics to make it something different. You can change the syllable count, rhyme scheme (add or get rid of it), anything you want to create a new form. Write this poem.
  • Give your new syllabic poetry form a name.

Use our normal forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, & the Kerf poetry. The optional form instructions are here.

In Japanese syllabic poetry, there is no capitalization on the first word in each line of your poem. Most of the American forms do not use capitalization either. Why? Syllabic poetry is written in breathy phrases, not sentences.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Padre9.sangeetha17.D. L. Finn
2.Reena Saxena10.ladyleemanila18.Gwen Plano
3.Jude11.anita dawes19.Sally Cronin
4.Cheryl12.Elizabeth20.Annette Rochelle Aben
5.willowdot2113.Laura McHarrie21.kittysverses
6.Jules14.Kerfe Roig22.
7.Susan Joy Clark15.Eugenia  
8.Ruth Klein16.theindieshe  

I loved all the wonderful poetry creations. If you haven’t had a chance to read everyone’s poetry, please take some time and enjoy the creativity. This was a fun exercise. It just goes to show how easy it is to create syllabic poetry forms from our usual forms. If your creativity needs a boost, create away!

The photo below was my view this morning. I’ve been dog sitting for Dustin and Molly, our adopted Air Force kids, while they attended a family reunion up north.

Don’t forget to connect with the Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse at wordweavingpoetryjournal.com. Submissions are open until July 15, 2021. I hope you will consider contributing. Please follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

I hope everyone had a happy and safe Fourth of July!

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Stars | Theme challenge-Discovery

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to choose synonyms for the words, “loose and tight,” using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, & the Kerf poetry. The optional form instructions are here.

In Japanese syllabic poetry, there is no capitalization on the first word in each line of your poem. Most of the American forms do not use capitalization either. Why? Syllabic poetry is written in breathy phrases, not sentences.

I’m thinking of starting a poetry reading session. Let me know what you think. Read the post HERE.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Susan Joy Clark8.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr15.Sally Cronin
2.Trent9.Donna Matthews16.Kerfe Roig
3.Reena Saxena10.Jules17.kittysverses
4.willowdot2111.Cheryl18.Annette Rochelle Aben
5.theindieshe12.Ruth Klein/ Ruth Scribbles19.Colleen Chesebro
6.Laura McHarrie13.anita dawes 20. Mystical Strings
7.Elizabeth14.Anisha 21. Jude 

I loved all the poetry this week. It’s always fun to see what inspires us the most. I would say, Jules’ choice of the theme of discovery fits the bill for most of us!

This week, I’ve selected Donna Matthews to choose a theme for us to work with next month. I liked how she combined the theme of discovery along with the Hemingway quote in her post. I also liked the philosophical tone of her words. The idea of discovery is there, but you realize the truth all on your own.

Time Traveler

what day of your life are you living
time traveler or present day
what I have found to be true
you will be forgotten
stay here beloved
your days fleeting
soon, this now
today
past

© 2021 Donna Matthews

This week, I’ve asked Donna Matthews to choose the prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Don’t forget to connect with the Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse at wordweavingpoetryjournal.com to learn the theme of this first journal. Submissions are open until July 15, 2021. Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY STARS | #Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

Happy Summer Solstice! Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our poetry based off of the artwork from Kerfe Roig using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, & diatelle poetry.

Artwork by Kerfe Roig

Here’s our monthly schedule:

Many thanks to Kerfe for the artwork and to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena8.Susan Joy Clark15.Kerfe Roig
2.Selma9.Cheryl16.Colleen Chesebro
3.Trent McDonald10.TJS Sherman17.Ruth E Klein aka Ruthscribbles
4.Myrna Migala11.Elizabeth18.kittysverses
5.willowdot2112.anita dawes19.D. Wallace Peach
6.theindieshe13.Jude20.
7.Jules14.Annette Rochelle Aben  

What a fabulous image we had to work with! Personally, I used all six of my senses to “feel” the magic that slipped into my chōka poetry… and I must add a note about this form. I used rhyme in my poem which is not correct. I couldn’t seem to write the poem without the rhyme, so I called the form “chōka-like,” or “inspired by the chōka form.”

When we create our poems using the Japanese forms, we must stay as true to the rules as possible. However, I see no reason why you can’t get creative… as long as you do not claim the form to be the Japanese form that inspired you. Create & Write On!


There was so much stunning poetry this week. I can’t get over the creativity. When we deal with Ekphrastic challenges we should tune into the feelings the piece of art gives us. Those feelings should be the inspiration for your poetry. It’s not so much what’s in the picture as to how it makes you feel.

Here’s an example of what I’m talking about: Jules has written a haibun that incorporates what is happening in her day along with some of the feelings (the haiku portions) she received from the artwork.

I was really taken with Elizabeth’s tanka. Here’s what she says in her post: “My first thought when I looked at this artwork was about a party in the sky, and of course, the moon is the host of the party!” This tanka sings! The pivot, saluting the moon, shows that party in the sky between the constellations and the dancing birds. We get the second meaning by using the pivot and adding the last two lines! I especially loved the creativity of the phrase “the mystical nightdress.”

I selected this Etheree by Annette Rochelle Aben because she doesn’t describe what she sees, she shares how the image made her feel. What an inspiring piece of poetry!

"Within Reach"

there
they were
floating high
in the night air
worlds I sought to touch
sometimes, seeming so close
that all I needed to do
was to stretch as far as I could
and if I closed my eyes while reaching
I could pull myself up to where they were

©2021 Annette Rochelle Aben

This week, I’ve asked Annette to choose the Ekphrastic photo prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your image to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Don’t forget to connect with the Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse at wordweavingpoetryjournal.com to learn the theme of this first journal. Submissions are open until July 15, 2021. Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!