Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 165 #PhotoPrompt

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the third week of the month! Time for a #PhotoPrompt

I selected Ritu Bhathal from last month’s challenge to pick the photo for this month. She has provided the following image. Please include the copyright when sharing this image on your blog.

Image Credit: © Ritu Bhathal

What emotions do you feel in the moment when you look at this photo? Now, write a poem!

ALSO… I’m looking for Senryu poetry in the 3/5/3 and 2/3/2 format to use in my new book as an example. If I use your poem you will retain all rights to your work. Your work is copyrighted and I cite you in the Bibliography at the end of the book. Please email me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks for your assistance.

On the Monday before the next Tuesday challenge, I will pick my favorite poem from this week’s challenge and share it on my blog. Whoever I pick will choose the photo for next month’s challenge! Email your selection to me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com.

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting blogs and leaving comments. Peer reviews help poets perfect their writing craft. Remember… sharing is caring.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet (click the link below):

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

Every Tuesday I’ll post the challenge early enough so everyone can see it. Remember, there will be no recap.

The rules are simple. Write your poetry on your blog.

Do a link-back by placing the HTTPS:// address of the challenge post into your post. ALSO, please copy your poem and add it to the comments. If you created a Haiga, let us know in the comments with a link to your post. Now, all of the poetry ends up on the challenge post in one place.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

Are you missing my challenges? Search for me in the WordPress Reader or…

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


2020 Conversations with Colleen ~ Featuring Author, Ritu Bhathal @RituBhathal

I’m thrilled to be part of an amazing writing community that helps to support other authors. Today, please welcome poet and author, Ritu Bhathal to discuss her new book, “Marriage Unarranged,” available for purchase at the link below.

I’ve had the opportunity to read this book and you can read my 5 STAR review below.

Aashi’s parents caught my heart in this novel. They were kind and gentle, and always looking out for their family. Something tells me, there are going to be big changes for this family still to come. If anyone can cope, I know it will be Mohinder and Harjit. I asked Ritu to share some thoughts on Aashi’s view of Mohinder and Harjit, her parents in the book.

Thank you so much Colleen, for inviting me onto your blog, to talk a little bit about my new novel, Marriage Unarranged that released on Sunday 9th February.

You’re so welcome. I loved all the cultural aspects of “Marriage Unarranged,” Ritu. Tell me more!

A lot of people are aware of just how long this book has taken to come up for air (twenty years!) and it really is my book baby. Definitely time for it to take wings and fly!

Today, my main character, Aashi, wants to talk to you a little bit about her parents, Mohinder and Harjit, who she calls Daddy-ji and Mummy-ji.

Image by Layers from Pixabay

Hello again! I hope you’ve been enjoying getting to know some of my friends and family over the last few days.

My introductions wouldn’t be complete though without telling you a little bit about my parents, Mummy-ji and Daddy-ji.

I love my parents very much. They’ve given me everything a girl could ask for.

My daddy-ji, Mohinder, is the gentlest soul you could imagine. He treats me like a princess. But that doesn’t mean he spoils me. Put it this way, if you could bank love, I think I’d be a millionaire.

Mummy-ji often says he lets me get away with everything, but that’s not true. Daddy-ji just has a way of explaining things to me, so I know what is expected of me as the daughter in this family. And I could never hurt him. Sometimes I think there is something magical about my daddy-ji. It’s like when he puts his hand on my head, or he hugs me, nothing can harm me, ever.

Indian Gurdwara: Image by Shantanu Kashyap from Pixabay

Harjit, my mummy-ji, is your typical Indian mum. She’s a regular worshipper at the Gurdwara, and always worried about what others will say.

She loves me lots too, like Daddy-ji, but just has a different way of showing it. She feels like she’s done her job of preparing me for married life, by teaching me how to cook and keep a tidy house (though she doesn’t realise that Ravi hates eating Indian food all the time).

She’s had plenty of opinions to share while we’ve been planning the wedding. And she is rather excited at the prospect of going to India in a few weeks, to go shopping for my bridal outfit and a whole new Indian wardrobe for me called a daaj. It’s what your parents send you off with you when you get married.

Sikh Market – Vancouver: Vancouverobserver.com

It’s quite handy, having a father who’s business is selling Indian clothes. He has a shop here, on Soho Road. It’s a bit like mini India there. Anyway, he’s got plenty of contacts over in India, so we can get some good discounts while we are out there.

Sunny, my big brother, is going with us too. He loves working in the family business, and I think, secretly, Mummy-ji is glad. She loves to go back home to visit the family, but feels a little daunted by the shopping side and traveling without Daddy-ji. Having Sunny there will reassure her. She doesn’t think women should travel alone to India, even though it’s where she came from!

I’m dreading leaving my parent’s home. But I know I have to once I get married. We’ll live in our own house, but Ravi’s parents are just around the corner. They’re nice people, but not, you know, my Mummy-ji and Daddy-ji.

Here is an extract from the book where we meet Mohinder and Harjit:

Aashi pushed open the door to the sitting room. There sat her mum and dad, happily watching some family drama on their favourite Indian channel.

A small, sandalwood incense stick smouldered in a holder on the tiled fireplace, where below, instead of a cosy fire, was a three-bar electric heater, which was never switched on because Mummy-ji said it was too expensive. Above it, a framed picture of Guru Nanak Dev-Ji, the first of the Sikh gurus.

Little did they know their daughter’s life was just as complicated as the story unfolding on their screen.

Aashi’s eyes rested on her father, Mohinder. He sat there, on his favourite armchair, strategically positioned, so he got the best view of the television, engrossed in the programme. His black turban was taken off and put to the side on the small table beside him. One hand scratched his head, and the top knot, covered in a little, square hankie, was much reduced in size, compared to the tennis ball-sized bobble he used to have. Most men worried about their receding hairlines, Daddy-ji about his reducing top knot size. His other hand firmly gripped the Sky remote control, just in case one of the boys came in and tried to change the channel. Slightly tubby with a cuddly belly, he was a father no one feared. Aashi and her brothers respected him. All they were afraid of was disappointing him.

Aashi knew she’d always been the apple of her daddy-ji’s eye. If he’d had his way, Aashi and Ravi would have moved in with them, so reluctant was he to have his darling daughter move out. On the flip side, he was happy because she seemed excited. Aashi was torn. He’d put all his faith in her and Ravi, and she was going to have to let him down.

There sat her mother, Harjit, on the three-seater sofa, with her cup of Indian masala tea in her hand, heavy on Mummy-ji’s favourite spice, cardamom, and a bowl with chevda, Bombay mix, on the well-worn coffee table in front of her. She was an attractive woman with the smooth skin of a teenager. That was the result of years of no makeup, soap and water, and good old Oil of Olay. The rounded figure was because of the three children she had borne and brought up. Her hair parted in the centre and pulled into a loose bun at the back of her head.

Mummy-ji always worried about Aashi being naïve, and her being taken advantage of, though after meeting Ravi, Aashi felt her mother’s concerns died down a little. She knew her mum was very excited about the wedding and all the plans. Deep breath. Can I do this?

At that moment, Aashi’s mum lifted her head. “Aashi, beti, where were you? You took so long! I thought you would be back sooner. I even called Ravi, there was no one answering the phone. Did you both go out somewhere?” Not waiting for an answer, she continued, “So, did you decide where your holiday was going to be?”

Find the unexpected answer to Mummy-ji’s question in “Marriage Unarranged.”

Ritu Bhathal was born in Birmingham, UK, in the mid-1970’s to migrant parents, hailing from Kenya but with Indian origins. This colourful background has been a constant source of inspiration to her.

From childhood, she always enjoyed reading. This love of books is mostly credited to her mother.

The joy of reading spurred her on to become creative in her own writing, from fiction to poetry.

Winning little writing competitions at school and locally gave her the encouragement to continue writing.

As a wife, mother, daughter, sister, and teacher, she has drawn on inspiration from many avenues to create the poems that she writes.

A qualified teacher, having studied at Kingston University, she now deals with classes of children as a sideline to her writing!

Ritu also writes a blog, a mixture of life and creativity, thoughts and opinions, which recently was awarded second place in the Best Overall Blog Category at the Annual Bloggers Bash Awards.

Ritu is happily married, and living in Kent, with her Hubby Dearest, and two children, not forgetting the furbaby Sonu Singh.

Ritu Bhathal Amazon Author Page

How to Connect with the Author

Blog Website: http://www.butismileanyway.com

Author Website: http://www.ritubhathal.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/RituBhathal
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ritubhathalwrites/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/butismileanyway/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RituBhathal/
Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/bhathalpadhaal/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/56854412-ritu-bhathal
Mix: https://mix.com/butismileanyway
Tumblr: https://www.tumblr.com/blog/ritusmiles

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ritu-bhathal-48941648/
Bloglovin: https://www.bloglovin.com/@ritubhathalpadhaal

Amazon https://www.amazon.com/author/ritubhathal

And by clicking the following link, you get to my author profile on Amazon

Author.to/RituBhathal

 myBook.to/PoeticRITUals

COLLEEN’S 2020 #BOOK #REVIEWS – “Marriage Unarranged,” BY AUTHOR, Ritu Bhathal, @RituBhathal

Featuring a Special RELEASE DAY Review!

About this Book

‘Chickpea Curry’ Lit — Chick Lit with and Indian twist!

It all started ended with that box…

Aashi’s life was all set.

Or so she thought.

Like in the Bollywood films, Ravi would woo her, charm her family and they’d get married and live happily ever after.

But then Aashi found the empty condom box…

Putting her ex-fiancé and her innocence behind her, Aashi embarks upon an enlightening journey, to another country, where vibrant memories are created, and unforgettable friendships forged.

Old images erased, new beginnings to explore.

And how can she forget the handsome stranger she meets? A stranger who’s hiding something…

Amazon.com

Click this LINK to view this exciting NEW RELEASE by Ritu Bhathal

MY RECOMMENDATION

Aashi is getting married! She envisions herself dressed in different bridal outfits, and she feels like a princess… until she turns up at Ravi’s house. The door is answered by Nishi, a drop-dead gorgeous co-worker of Ravi who leaves abruptly with Aashi’s arrival.

Aashi is a lovely young woman, the kind any man would be thrilled to marry. She’s a bit naïve, but still gives Ravi, the man of her dreams, the benefit of the doubt… until she discovers the empty condom box. His betrayal is a stab to her heart. She’s got nothing left except to explain to her parents and family the depth of Ravi’s betrayal.

Aashi battles the humiliation of a broken engagement by embarking on a new adventure to India accompanied by her brothers and best friend, Kiran. When the mysterious Arjun shows up, Aashi discovers a certain attraction that just won’t go away. Where will their relationship lead?

“Marriage Unarranged,” is a Hindi love story like no other. I found myself emersed in the culture of India, learning new Punjabi names for friends and family, including religious and cultural traditions. Did I forget to mention the food? How about the clothes? I was swept away by it all!

However, this book isn’t only about a young woman’s passage into adulthood. The author broaches many cultural taboos: broken engagements, children born out of wedlock, and homosexuality, all explored with kindness and acceptance.

Aashi’s parents (Harjit, her mother and Mohinder-ji, her father) only want what is best for their children. Are they equipped to go against cultural norms, all for the love of their family?

“Marriage Unarranged,” played out in my mind like a movie on the big screen. I smelled the incense, prayed at the Gurdwara with Aashi, caught the sparkle from the bangle bracelets for sale in the market; and I fell in love with the characters. I can’t wait to find out where the author takes us next!

I received an advanced reader copy of this book from the author. This book is available today. Grab your copy now!

MY RATING

*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

Colleen's Book ReviewsRating System

About the Author

Ritu Bhathal was born in Birmingham, UK, in the mid-1970’s to migrant parents, hailing from Kenya but with Indian origins. This colourful background has been a constant source of inspiration to her.

From childhood, she always enjoyed reading. This love of books is mostly credited to her mother.

The joy of reading spurred her on to become creative in her own writing, from fiction to poetry.

Winning little writing competitions at school and locally gave her the encouragement to continue writing.

As a wife, mother, daughter, sister, and teacher, she has drawn on inspiration from many avenues to create the poems that she writes.

A qualified teacher, having studied at Kingston University, she now deals with classes of children as a sideline to her writing!

Ritu also writes a blog, a mixture of life and creativity, thoughts and opinions, which recently was awarded second place in the Best Overall Blog Category at the Annual Bloggers Bash Awards.

Ritu is happily married, and living in Kent, with her Hubby Dearest, and two children, not forgetting the furbaby Sonu Singh.

Ritu Bhathal Amazon Author Page

How to Connect with the Author

BLOG: ritubhathal.com

TWITTER: @RituBhathal

FACEBOOK: Ritu Bhathal ~ Author, Poet, Storyteller

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 If you have your book listed on BookBub, I will add my review there also!  Click HERE to follow me! (Colleen M. Chesebro) Let me know in the comments if you follow me so I can follow you!

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Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mentions, No. 138, #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! Please visit the challenge post comments HERE, where you’ll find the links to everyone’s poetry. Stop by and say hello! ❤

The Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do.

This week, I’ve chosen Ritu Bhathal as the Poet of the Week for her Tanka poem featured below. The first time I read this poem, I immediately noticed the last line. What a surprise! Ritu mirrors the dark and light found in all of us with. I like the play on words because it was so unexpected. This Tanka can also be read forward and backward – intensifying the meaning of her words.

Not sure how to write a Tanka poem? Find out more HERE and in this article on the Pen & the Pad.

Clear & Nature, #Tanka

Relax, Read, Book, Rest, Enjoy
Pixabay Image
It isn't simple
Judging someone's character
On a first meeting
Never judge a book, they say
By cover, more lies within

Kerfe Roig’s Haibun/Tanka is a real stunner. The prose part of this Haibun transports the reader on a magical trip. Kerfe employs her artwork in every poem she writes. The image grid below compliments her prose and the Tanka.

Remember, when writing a Haibun, the poetry should never repeat, quote, or explain the prose. The Tanka should reflect a different aspect of the prose by sharing another narrative as a microburst of detail.

I also love her creative word play. Check out: “rainbowed,” which relates to her word imagery and the grid she constructed.

AUGUST (2019), #Haibun #Tanka

autumn 2019 grid s
Kerfe Roig

Is it the sky I seize when my hand reaches out to touch the storm of rain? Or do the heavens remain behind the veil, rainbowed and unclouded, waiting for the thunderings of the gods to echo into quietude as they follow the flashes of light to the edge of the horizon?

Everything around me is covered with drops of liquid light.

Gaia, drunk with the season’s retreat, builds an improvised framework out of the movements of the moon.

I look for the line
between now and again, where
flower becomes seed–
All is stillness, dense, restless–
leaves shiver, rattled by wind.

See you for tomorrow’s challenge!

Conversations With Colleen: Meet Author, Ritu Bhathal

Conversations with ColleenThe October Edition

Hello everyone! This week I’m thrilled to bring you one of my most favorite people in the blogging world, Ritu Bhathal. Not only is she a successful blogger, but she is also an author and a poet… and that doesn’t include all the other jobs she has. I asked her to pick three or four questions from my huge list HERE. We all aspire to be successful authors and the best way to learn some of the tricks of the trade is to ask questions.

I met Ritu shortly after I started blogging in 2014. I can’t tell you how many times our paths have crossed over the years as we participated in poetry and writing challenges. If I don’t know how to do something concerning social media, Ritu is there to show me how. And that illustrates the kind of person that Ritu is. She’s always there to lend a helping hand.

In fact, last year, Ritu didn’t miss a week in writing a poem for my weekly poetry challenge. That’s pretty impressive in my book. ❤

Please meet my dear friend, Ritu Bhathal:

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Author & Poet, Ritu Bhathal

Ritu Bhathal was born in Birmingham in the mid-1970’s to migrant parents, hailing from Kenya but with Indian origin. This colourful background has been a constant source of inspiration to her.

From childhood, she always enjoyed reading. This love of books is mostly credited to her mother. The joy of reading spurred her on to become creative in her own writing, from fiction to poetry. Winning little writing competitions at school and locally gave her the encouragement to continue writing.

As a wife, mother, daughter, sister, and teacher, she has drawn on inspiration from many avenues to create the poems that she writes. A qualified teacher, having studied at Kingston University, she now deals with classes of children as a sideline to her writing!

Ritu also writes a blog, a mixture of life and creativity, thoughts and opinions, which was awarded first place in the Best Overall Blog Category at the 2017 Annual Bloggers Bash Awards.

Ritu is happily married, and living in Kent, with her Hubby Dearest, and two children, not forgetting the furbaby Sonu Singh.

Having published an anthology of poetry, Poetic RITUals, she is currently working on some short stories, and a novel, to be published in the near future.

Hi, Colleen. Thanks so much for this interview. I’m happy to be here with you.

Tea time

I’m thrilled you’re here, Ritu. I even made P. G. Tips tea to celebrate your visit! Now, I’m going to ask you a question I hope you will answer. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Ideas are aplenty in my brain! But I have one fully written, unedited manuscript, which took me 17 years to write! There is one other series I wrote on my blog, which came to a natural end, that I think could be worked upon to create something too.

I also started another piece, which I think will be a good start for another contemporary fiction piece. Though I know many are aware of my love of poetry, and my anthology, I have also written children’s rhyming fiction. I have one versed story complete and two others that need finishing… oh, to have an illustrator!!!

Any unemployed illustrators out there? Ritu needs your skills! Sorry, I got carried away… Okay, I’m serious now. Ritu, what inspires you to write?

What inspires me to write, both blog posts and creatively is life. I always jokingly call life, and all experiences within it ‘Blogger Fodder’ but it’s not just a base for a post, but it’s also a great resource to pull from when writing fiction and poetry. Usually, the season we are in will inspire my verses, and the general mood around me will influence the direction of my fictional writing. I feel that we are so lucky to have this opportunity called life, that to use all the gifts it bestows upon us, to create engaging literature, is gratitude.

You have such a marvelous attitude and love for life. It shows in everything you do. So, do you have a day job other than being a writer? And do you like it?

I do indeed have a day job (besides writing, mothering, and wife-ing) and that is being a teacher. I wanted to teach from a very young age, seven to be precise, and it gave me great pleasure to finally get into a classroom I could call my own!

The life of a teacher is tough, with high expectations put upon us all, causing many to leave the profession. So far, I have taken the challenges on the head; teaching is all-consuming, and during the term, I often suffer from extreme tiredness, (mentally and physically) so this does impact my creativity.

But I love being a teacher. To be the one to influence all those young minds, and help to build a foundation for what I always hope will be a lifelong love for learning, that’s what it is all about. The day it becomes too much, I will step back, or if my second dream of writing was to flourish, then I would maybe stop, but right now, I couldn’t, financially, and to be honest, I don’t want to!

Thanks, Ritu for stopping by for a chat. I always enjoy spending time with you. P. S. I had to share my favorite of you and your husband on your wedding day. You look so beautiful! ❤

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I’ve read and reviewed Ritu’s book, “Poetic Rituals,” whose name is a clever play on words with her first name. Read my review HERE.

Social media

How to contact Author, Ritu Bhathal

Website: http://www.butismileanyway.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/PhantomGiggler
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/phantom_giggler/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/butismileanyway/
Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/bhathalpadhaal/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/56854412-ritu-bhathal
Flipboard: https://flipboard.com/@Phantom_Giggler
Mix: https://mix.com/butismileanyway
Tumblr: https://www.tumblr.com/blog/ritusmiles

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ritu-bhathal-48941648/
Bloglovin: https://www.bloglovin.com/@ritubhathalpadhaal

And by clicking the following link, you get to my author profile on Amazon, where you can find the link to my poetry book, Poetic RITUals.

Author.to/RituBhathal

k luv u bye Thanks for stopping by to meet Ritu Bhathal. Check out her book. I loved it. ❤

Loving Me A Giphy! #BloggingTips

Did you know that we can share GIFS from GIPHY.COM to our WordPress comments? I didn’t either, but thanks to Ritu, we can learn how. ❤

PLUS: you can share in a post! It’s fairy magic!

 

 

But I Smile Anyway...

You know I have my faithful Bitmoji avatar which I use on most of my posts. I do love her!

She’s got the feisty nature I might not really portray in my day to day life!

But I wasn’t feeling fulfilled…

I was getting jealous of those bloggers who were using GIFS within the body of their texts.

And it is possibly something most of you know how to do, but if you’re anything like me, you would be in awe of those little moving pictures too!

So I discovered how to add GIFs to my posts!

Isn’t that just the coolest?

Then Colleen, the Fairy Whisperer, asked me how I managed to get the GIF in my comments, and I knew I had to share my newfound knowledge! You can’t call me a selfish blogger!

So, here is a quick step-by-step guide to how to add a GIF from…

View original post 81 more words

Colleen’s 2018 #Book #Reviews – “Poetic RITUals,” by Ritu Bhathal

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Title: Poetic RITUals

Amazon Author Page:  Ritu Bhathal

Publication Date: June 29, 2016

Formats: Paperback & Kindle

Genres: Poetry, Teen & Young Adult, Women’s

Goodreads

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

Delve into a book of verse exploring different topics and different genres, all with a RITUal twist. A collection of poetry drawing on the experiences of the writer, ranging from matters of the heart, love for the family, situations in life and some verses written with a humorous twist.

MY RECOMMENDATION:

The first thing that attracted me to this book of poetry was the clever play-on-words with the title, Poetic RITUals, and the author’s name. They always say to not judge a book by its cover, but in this case, you should. As clever and heartwarming as the title suggests, so is the poetry inside.

The book was filled with a delightful and eclectic mix of metered poems filled with patterned beats and rhymes, Haiku, and freestyle poetry. Another charming addition was the way the book was divided into four different sections of “RITUals,” family, life, of the heart, and to make you smile. I found the categorization to be a peek into the ingenious mind of the poet.

The themes of motherhood and family, her work as a teacher, and that of being a wife are shared with love and laughter. Many of the poems gave a realistic look at the author’s life that I found endearing. I remembered feeling much the same way when my kids were young.

One of my favorites in this collection was a piece called, “Poetic Confusion,” which I found in the last section of the book. The author laments the writing of poetry in its many forms; finally coming to the conclusion that she would rhyme and vent to her heart’s content, and write poetry in her own way. I love her poetic spirit and spunk.

Poetic RITUals is a must read for wives and mothers of all ages who also wear many hats just to get through a normal day. This sweet book will make you smile. Enjoy it over a cup of tea, or two… I did. ❤

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 Fairies

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*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

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Author & Poet, Ritu Bhathal

About the Author:

Ritu Bhathal was born in Birmingham, UK, in the mid-1970’s to migrant parents, hailing from Kenya but with Indian origins. This colourful background has been a constant source of inspiration to her.

From childhood, she always enjoyed reading. This love of books is mostly credited to her mother. The joy of reading spurred her on to become creative in her own writing, from fiction to poetry. Winning little writing competitions at school and locally gave her the encouragement to continue writing. As a wife, mother, daughter, sister, and teacher, she has drawn on inspiration from many avenues to create the poems that she writes. A qualified teacher, having studied at Kingston University, she now deals with classes of children as a sideline to her writing!

Ritu also writes a blog, a mixture of life and creativity, thoughts and opinions, which recently was awarded second place in the Best Overall Blog Category at the Annual Bloggers Bash Awards.

Ritu is happily married and living in Kent, with her Hubby Dearest, and two children, not forgetting the fur baby, Sonu Singh.

She is currently working on some short stories, and a novel, to be published in the near future.

How to Connect with the Author:

Blog: Butismileanyway.com

TWITTER: @PhantamGiggler

FACEBOOK: But I Smile Anyway…

witchey kissesThanks for stopping by to meet Ritu. Check out her book. You’ll love it.

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Colleen’s #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge #63 – Cover & Precipitation (#SynonymsOnly)

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry? HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! I hope you will support each other with visits to blogs and by leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

I know the next two weeks are filled with family holiday celebrations. Stay off the computer and enjoy your family time! Happy Christmas, Yule, Hanukkah, & Kwanza. ❤

witch wreaths

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

The main idea behind my sponsoring of this challenge is to help everyone learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

LEARN the rules by clicking on the links below.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the link to learn about each type:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have some sort of irony present.

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

 

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 62nd POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – BELLS & PAST

Call of the Future – Reena Saxena

Jingle Bells – By Sarah

Tanka Tuesday: Acorns – Jane Dougherty Writes

Pealing Back the Years – #Haibun #Senryu | Trent’s World (the Blog)

there was magic | like mercury colliding…

Deafening Sound – Cinquain Poem | awisewomansjourney

Bells of Light: #Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Tanka: Bells & Past – Tea & Paper

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY POETRY CHALLENGE #Senryu #62: BELLS & PAST | But I Smile Anyway…

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge – The Bag Lady

Indiscriminately ~ #Tanka #Poem | Exclusive Inflictions

#Tanka Tuesday 12/12/17…This Christmas Spirit…#haiku #poetry – Frank J. Tassone

My Christmas Offering – Stuff & What If?

Tuesday Poetry Challenge: Bells & Past – Robbie’s Inspiration

Tanka – Bells & Past | thoughts and entanglements

“Tower Carillons” A Tanka, #SynonymsOnly | Colleen Chesebro The Fairy Whisperer

Killing the Light (5 years) | method two madness

Carillon | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

#Senryu: Prayer | Charmed Chaos

Persistent – Playing with words

Haiku: Winter – My Feelings My Freedom

Heaven’s Bells – Smell The Coffee

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Bells & Past | Annette Rochelle Aben

Don’t FORGET! If you are selected as my Poet of the Week, I will feature your poem in my bi-monthly newsletter.

Sign-up HERE.

This week’s Poet of the Week is Ritu, from her blog, ButIsmileanyway.com. Her Senryu made me chuckle as she took a humorous route with her poetry. I liked her choice of synonym because the words “alarm and ended” gave just the right tone to her poem. This senryu illustrates the perfect ironic event, and Ritu’s last two words make the poem. ❤

(Pixabay Image)

Switch the alarm off
Sweet dreams have ended too soon
Reality bites

Ritu © 2017

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: COVER & PRECIPITATION

(Don’t forget to use synonyms)

IT’S POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 44 – #Haiku #Haibun or #Tanka: HUNT & FIND

HAPPY Poetry Tuesday, everyone! Can you believe today is the first day of August? Where does the time go?

Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

Image credit: alaskacarnate.com

Click the link to learn about the Poet, John Keats

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge you can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

Are you new to writing the Haiku in English poetry form? Please read my page, How to Write a Haiku in English.

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the
    first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN HOW TO LINK YOUR WORDPRESS BLOG TO TWITTER

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 43rd POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – HEAT & CONFUSE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. Remember, we all learn from each other and need encouragement. <3)

Blowing hot and cold – Playing with words

Unravelling – By Sarah

Shy soul (Tanka) – Uniquesus

Did I just say that? – Reena Saxena

Tanka Tuesday: Illusion – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge – #Haiku #Tanka : HEAT & CONFUSE | But I Smile Anyway…

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge Heat and Confuse

You #Tanka | Trent’s World (the Blog)

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge Heat & Confuse | Annette Rochelle Aben

Life’s Garden/Stuff & What If

Yellow Crystal Seeds | Collages

Tea with Mom Haibun/Tanka | like mercury colliding…

Confusion (Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Heat & Confuse | thoughts and entanglements

Colleen’s weekly #Poetry challenge – Heat and confused – Robbie’s inspiration

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge – #Haiku #Tanka #Haibun: HEAT & CONFUSE – Ladyleemanila

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge – #Haiku #Tanka #Haibun: HEAT & CONFUSE | willowdot21

“Doubts,” A #Haibun – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Silent Parade: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

#Tanka: Migration | Charmed Chaos

HEAT AND CONFUSE- HAIKU PROMPT | WANDSANDUNICORNS

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge – #Haiku – HEAT & CONFUSE – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge – Tanka: HEAT & CONFUSE – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge – #Haiku #Tanka #Haibun: HEAT & CONFUSE | M J Mallon Author

Fanfare | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Don’t FORGET! If you are selected as my Poet of the Week, your poem will also be featured in my monthly newsletter. Sign up HERE.

This week’s Poet of the Week is Ritu, from her blog, But, I Smile Anyway. She is the author of her first book of poetry, creatively titled, Poetic Rituals.

“Delve into a book of verse exploring different topics and different genres, all with a RITUal twist.
A collection of poetry drawing on the experiences of the writer, ranging from matters of the heart, love for the family, situations in life and some verses written with a humorous twist.”

Buy on Amazon

I choose Ritu’s Tanka and Haiku, for a couple of reasons. The humor factor was high in both pieces, and I got a good chuckle.

Ritu is a teacher, and I loved how she let us know how confused she was with all her administrative duties. I felt her chaotic moment in time was captured perfectly with her apt descriptions. Well done.

Her Haiku not only speaks truth to her confusion about the passing of the years, but it also gives us a humorous glance at things to come or those that have passed. Humor is a powerful emotion and we should use it more often in our poetry. ❤


Image from Google

They turned up the heat
My to-do lists are insane!
I am so confused!
What should I concentrate on?
Ticking ‘boxes’ or children?

© Ritu 2017

And a HAiku for all you Mid-life ladies… I’m nearing there too!

Enter a caption

All hot and flustered
These turns are confusing me
Am I young or old?

© Ritu 2017

(Have you wondered how to make the copyright symbol? Press the Alt key and 0169 = ©)

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: HUNT & FIND

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

laptop-2055522_1280

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!