#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 281 | #PhotoPrompt, #Ekphrastic

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena7.Jules13.Ruth Klein
2.willowdot218.theindieshe14.D.G. Kaye
3.ben Alexander9.Yvette M Calleiro15.kittysverses
4.Gwen Plano10.Goutam Dutta16.Margaret 21
5.Balroop Singh11.Selma17.Mayuri Srivastava
6.The Versesmith12.Annette Rochelle Aben18.You’re next!

We’re almost at the end of our bathroom renovation. One more week… because of a cracked counter top which had to be replaced. By next weekend, we should be finished, fini, terminado, done!! I miss writing poetry! I am renovation’d out! It’s been a long year and a half of waiting for contractors, waiting for supplies, and waiting for it all to be over. If you’ve never done renovations, let me tell you, it’s messy, dirty, and hugely disruptive. We’re almost at the finish line!

Many thanks to all of you for writing syllabic poetry this week. I apologize for the time it took me to read and comment on your poems. On top of the renovations, we found another leak under the sink, and my Wi-Fi/computer had hiccups again! The plumber gets another call tomorrow, and I think I solved the issues with my Wi-Fi. Trouble shooting is a wonderful thing.

I want to thank Willow for providing the photo of the statue from St. Pancras station. Margaret, from FROM PYRENEES TO PENNINES shares more information about the statue and the station, which I found really interesting.

This statue inspired a wide range of poetry. I loved how everyone interpreted this piece of art differently. That’s important to your poetry and sharing what you see or feel is the whole idea behind Ekphrastic poetry.

Reena’s Blason poem really spoke to me. The form is interesting—a new form for me. Also, I detected some negative energy from the statue, as did a few other poets. (This was before I read Margaret’s informative post about the statue).

Reena’s poem is an excellent example of selecting the perfect form to portray the “spirit” of the statue.

Poetscollective.org states:

Blason is a genre of poetry committed to the praise or blame of something through the use of a series of images that support the theme. It is a variation of the ancient Catalogue Poem. From French heraldry, blason translates as “the codified description of a coat of arms” Originally French poet, Clement Marot, wrote a poem praising a woman by listing parts of her body with metaphors to compare with them. Parts of the female body became a recurring topic of the Blason and continues to be the focus, although other subjects could be adapted.

Although the concept of the Blason can be applied to any verse form such as the sonnet or Blank Verse, the Blason often takes the form of octosyllabic or decasyllabic verse that ends with an epigraphic conclusion.

The Blason is often
• framed at the discretion of the poet, although lines are often syllabic, 8 or 10 syllables long.
• composed with a list of different images of the same thing with accompanying metaphors.
• written with a sharp conclusion.”

Blason: poetscollective.org

“Threat”

She raises her foot to meet his sharp gaze
yet her trust fails to see the looming threat

She fails to see the support underground
people wish well, but fear the bayonet

His manner spells danger, he’ll get his way
pretends to kiss, wants to intimidate

she has time to loosen his deathly grip
jump out, be rescued rather than regret

© Reena Saxena

This week, I’ve asked Reena Saxena to choose the photo prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your image (with credits) to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 August Specific Form: Yvette

💚 August Photo Prompt: Reena

💛 July Theme Prompt: Harmony

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 281, 7/19/22 #Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

This challenge explores Ekphrastic poetry, inspired by visual art or photographs. Willow provided the photo for this month’s challenge. Now, we can see this is a statue, so get creative and think about what this statue could represent. Think about imagery and symbolism… then select a form and craft your poem!

© Willow Willers

Write your poem using a syllabic form from the cheat sheet or from the poetscollective.org/poetryforms. Here is more information on how to write an Ekphrastic poem: How Do You Write an Ekphrastic Poem.

“Ekphrastic poems exist to respond to a piece of art critically, analytically, and reverentially.”

Ekphrastic poetry explained

On the Monday before the next challenge, I will select a poem from this week’s challenge to feature on the Monday recap. That poet will then choose the piece of artwork or a photograph (credits included) for next month’s challenge! Email your selection to me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com, a week before the challenge. Thank you.


Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

THE RULES

  • Write your choice of syllabic poem from the cheat sheet or from the poetscollective.org/poetryforms.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 August Specific Form: Yvette

💚 July Photo Prompt: Willow

💛 July Theme Prompt: Harmony

So, who wants to have fun and write some poetry?


#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 274 | #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org. David, from the Skeptic’s Kaddish, provided the photo below.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena9.Cheryl17.Colleen Chesebro
2.ben Alexander10.Jules18.Ruth Klein
3.Harmony Kent11.Veera19.s. s.
4.willowdot2112.Kerfe20.Sally Cronin
5.Gwen Plano13.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr21.Annette Rochelle Aben
6.Lauren Swanberg14.Yvette M Calleiro22.Jude

When David sent me this photo, I immediately saw the potential in the image. It was a photo of his father taking photos. The best part—we couldn’t see what he was seeing. That left so much room for speculation on our parts. In my humble opinion, this is the perfect inspiration for crafting great poetry! At the same time, the photo was deeply personal to our friend, as his father had passed.

© David, The Skeptic’s Kaddish

The exploration of “what was beyond the photo lens” resulted in some of the best poetry I’ve read in a long time. Could this be a lesson for us in finding inspiration? The next time you find yourself stuck because you don’t know what to write about, imagine yourself behind the lens of a camera… what do you see?

I found Reena’s gogyohka, written in breathy phrases, to be a powerful read!

This tanka by Tzvi Fievel shares some amazing imagery!

Willow’s nonet, The Lens of the Soul, written both forward and backward is an excellent example of the nonet form. When you read the poem the first way, you get one meaning, but the more powerful meaning comes from reading the poem in the reverse.

through the lens of the omnipotent
to soar high beyond the body
to attain the higher plain
past the confines of life
further than the eye
the horizon
life beyond
captured
truth

********

truth
captured
life beyond
the horizon
further than the eye
past the confines of life
to attain the higher plain
to soar high beyond the body
through the lens of the omnipotent

© Willow Willers

This week, I’ve asked Willow to choose the #PhotoPrompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your photo (with credits) to me at least a week before the challenge to colleen@wordcraftpoetry.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

“At the Top of the World,” shadorma sequence

at the top 
of the world, white clouds 
kiss the sky
winds exhale
the soft breath of the goddess—
Gaia rests

at the top 
of the world, heaven
meets the earth
at center
'tween stars and moon, darkness falls—
Spirit calls

at the top
of the world—rebirth!
Gilgul spins 
in search of 
the highest form of virtue—
Nirvana

© Colleen M. Chesebro

This week for #TankaTuesday we used an image from David at the Skeptic’s Kaddish. Here are my instructions: This is a photo of David’s father. Please be aware that he is no longer with us. David dedicated his blog to his father’s memory. You can read more about his journey HERE. With that being said, take a deep look at this photo. Don’t describe what we all can see. Look into the camera lens… what do YOU see? What is revealed to you? Now, write your syllabic poem.

I apologize for any liberties I took with anyone’s particular religious beliefs. My heart was full of poetic inspiration. I meant no disprespect. As many of you know, my own belief system comprises many theories, and I often mix them all together, as I did in this poem.

According to myjewishlearning.com, “Gilgul is a concept that is described in great detail throughout the Kabbalah. Very much in line with samsara, which is often depicted as a wheel in Buddhist art, the word gilgul comes from the Hebrew root meaning “to spin.” The soul, in the kabbalistic view, spins onward through a great many bodies, striving after a higher form of perfection.”

What do you see beyond the camera lens?

 

Join me and learn how to write syllabic poetry! Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available in print and ebook versions on Amazon.com.

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 274, 5/17/22 #Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

This challenge explores Ekphrastic poetry, inspired by visual art or photographs. David, from the Skeptic’s Kaddish, provided the photo for this month’s challenge.

This is a photo of David’s father. Please be aware that he is no longer with us. David dedicated his blog to his father’s memory. You can read more about his journey HERE. With that being said, take a deep look at this photo. Don’t describe what we all can see. Look into the camera lens… what do YOU see? What is revealed to you? Now, write your syllabic poem.

© David, The Skeptic’s Kaddish

Write your poem using a syllabic form from the cheat sheet or from the poetscollective.org/poetryforms. Here is more information on how to write an Ekphrastic poem: How Do You Write an Ekphrastic Poem.

“Ekphrastic poems exist to respond to a piece of art critically, analytically, and reverentially.”

Ekphrastic poetry explained

On the Monday before the next challenge, I will select a poem from this week’s challenge to feature on the Monday recap. That poet will then choose the piece of artwork or a photograph (credits included) for next month’s challenge! Email your selection to me at wordcraftpoetry@mail.com, a week before the challenge. Thank you.


Here are some impressive sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

THE RULES

  • Write your choice of a syllabic poem using a form from the cheat sheet or from the poetscollective.org/poetryforms.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Interested in self-publishing your poetry book? Learn how my services can help you make your dreams come true: HERE.

So, who wants to have fun and write some syllabic poetry?


#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 270 -Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

I’ve been doing a lot of spring cleaning at my house and on the blog. I’ll continue to update the challenge cheat sheet so you can find everything in one place. The main page of wordcraftpoetry.com also contains helpful links, and other widgets. If you’re looking for something, this might be the place to start. Don’t forget the navigation widgets on the right-hand side of the blog. I have them spit between word craft poetry, Colleen Chesebro, and Word Weaving poetry journal.

The good thing about cleaning is how the action of cleaning forces you to work in the moment. As I concentrated on the different tasks, I realized how good it felt to step away from the computer for a bit. I’m working on another book, and with all of my other projects, it’s easy to get worn out. This winter was especially cold and long, so I did something for myself. I created a yoga room! This will give me a place to exercise a few times a week. Now that the weather is warmer, I’ll have gardening chores to attend to. I bet you will too!

Everyone remember, this challenge is a time when you can step away from the challenges of life and immerse yourself in the written word. If it doesn’t work for you, don’t stress. Stop by to write poetry when you can. ❤️

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena7.Jules13.Yvette M Calleiro
2.ben Alexander8.Gwen Plano14.Ruth Klein
3.Harmony Kent9.Sarah David15.M J Mallon
4.willowdot2110.Balroop Singh16.D. Wallace Peach
5.Annette Rochelle Aben11.Sally Cronin  
6.D. L. Finn12.theindieshe  

D. L. Finn shared such a lovely image of dolphins. I was so impressed with everyone’s poetry this week. Thanks for joining in!

There were a couple of reasons why I chose David’s garland cinquain. I was mesmerized by how each verse flowed into the next, sharing the life of these gentle creatures. The flow of the stanzas mimicked the rhythm of the sea. The final cinquain, summed up the poem in a spectacular way. This is a delightful poem!

A Garland Cinquain

An ekphrastic poem

loving
tactile closeness
complex social networks
mothers and calves; pair-bonded males
tight ties

echoes
a world of words
piercing high frequencies
sound waves cut through murky waters
pictures

vocal
sweet exchanges
love, pathos, joy, warnings
collaborative, synchronized
fishing

coupling
sex for pleasure
mates belly–to–belly 
nuzzle, click, rub, pectoral pat
fondness

decades
long memories
enduring relationships
shared emotions; dreams, ideas
one pod

loving
a world of words
love, pathos, joy, warnings
nuzzle, click, rub, pectoral pat
one pod

© David Bogomolny

This week, I’ve asked David to choose the Ekphrastic photo prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your image to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 270 #PhotoPrompt

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

This challenge explores Ekphrastic poetry, inspired by visual art or photographs. D. L. Finn provided the photo for this month’s challenge:

Write your poem using a syllabic form from the cheat sheet or from the poetscollective.org/poetryforms. This is a photo, but there are some great tips in this article on how to write an Ekphrastic poem: How Do You Write an Ekphrastic Poem.

“Ekphrastic poems exist to respond to a piece of art critically, analytically, and reverentially.”

Ekphrastic poetry explained

On the Monday before the next challenge, I will select a poem from this week’s challenge to feature on the Monday recap. That poet will then choose the piece of artwork or a photograph (credits included) for next month’s challenge! Email your selection to me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com, a week before the challenge. Thank you.


Here are some impressive sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text that will count the total number of syllables and number of syllables per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

THE RULES

  • Write your choice of a syllabic poem from the cheat sheet or from the poetscollective.org/poetryforms.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the HTTPS:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Interested in self-publishing? Learn how my services can help make your dream come true HERE.

Let’s write some poetry!


#TANKATUESDAY Weekly #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 261, 2/15/22 #PHOTOPROMPT

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

Diana Peach selected the image for this week’s photo prompt. It’s an image from Pixabay.com, compliments ofPretty sleepy.”

Remember, we can see what’s in the image, so write your poem using the image as an inspiration. Don’t just describe what you see in the image. Use your imagination. Open your third eye and see what’s behind the red door! Think about metaphor and allegory. Just remember to check what form you’re using. Some of the Japanese forms frown upon the use of metaphors. 

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ this FIRST: How to Start Crafting Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

  • Write your poem inspired by the Ekphrastic image above using a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheatsheet OR from the Poetscollective.org. Watch your word choice. Do not use words that end in “ing.” Use imagery. BE creative and try alternative forms. Make sure you follow the directions on how to write the form. It’s always fun to share how to write the write the form so we can all learn together. Remember… we are still working with syllabic poetry forms.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work. Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

MR. LINKY BELOW

So, Word Crafters… who wants to have fun and shovel snow… I mean, write some syllabic poetry? <3


The #TankaTuesday 2022 Poetry Challenge Schedule

This is our last #TankaTuesday post for 2021. I’ve taken a holiday from the blog starting December 27 through January 2, 2022.

Our first #TankaTuesday post will be January 4, 2022.

After careful consideration of all your wonderful prompt suggestions, I’ve compiled the weekly challenge prompts for 2022. Feel free to copy the prompt images from this page to use on your own blogs, if you wish. Please do not use the prompt images from prior year’s challenges as they do not reflect the current information.

Please note:

On most of the prompts, I’ve left the selection of the syllabic forms open to the poet. This is to give you a chance to practice new or old forms on your own terms. It also gives you more say in what you want to write and learn. Remember, Japanese poetry has stricter rules than most of the other forms.

The challenge runs from Tuesday through Sunday at noon (Detroit, USA time). I’ll continue to create a Monday Recap. Remember to add your poems to Mr. Linky. That way, we have all the poetry submitted in one place. All I have to do is cut and paste into the recap.

A new rule this year: NO “ing” endings on words to make the syllable count work. Go that step further to find a better word.

I’m a purest with Japanese poetry, and for the #TankaTuesday challenges, please follow the rules of the specific form. Pay attention to what forms get titles and which ones don’t.

A haibun is always “at least one prose paragraph and a haiku” – not a haibun and a haiku. Tanka Prose is always at least one prose paragraph and a tanka. Remember the difference between haiku and senryu. If you create a haiga, the photo cannot complete the poem. Tanka poetry in photos does not make it a haiga. We should place only haiku and senryu in photos. Remember, that’s why we call this a CHALLENGE. It’s important to follow the rules of the forms. <3

We’re going back to our roots this year as we feature syllabic poetry only. All submitted poetry must have a syllable structure from the Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet, or the syllabic forms on the PoetsCollective.org. Be careful… not all the forms listed in the Poets Collective are syllabic forms. If in doubt, stick to the forms on the Tanka Tuesday Cheat sheet below:

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

I’ll start us off by choosing the prompts in January 2022. The poets take over in February 2022 with their selections.

First Week of the Month: Taste the Rainbow

Poets choose your own form and color. If the poem is from the #TankaTuesday Cheat sheet, let us know so we know where to look for directions. If the form is something new, include how to write the form.

Second Week of the Month: Colleen’s #SpecificForm

In the second week of the month, I’ll select a syllabic form for us to write. I’ll also give examples of how to write the form and tell you what I can find out about the form’s history. As a bonus, I’ll provide a song or another piece of poetry to inspire your own poetry creation. Occasionally, I’ll include information about a literary poet who also writes this form.

Third Week of the Month: #Photo Prompt

In the third week of the month, we will receive our poetic inspiration from a photo or Ekphrastic prompt chosen by one of our poets. In January, I’ll pick someone to select a photo or a piece of art to inspire a syllabic poem of our choice. Email your choice to colleen@wordcraftpoetry.com.

Fourth Week of the Month: #ThemePrompt

In the fourth week of the month, we will receive our poetic inspiration from a theme prompt chosen by one of our poets. In January, I’ll pick someone to select a theme to inspire a syllabic poem of our choice. Email your choice to colleen@wordcraftpoetry.com.

Fifth Week of the Month: #ShareYourDay – Take a Photo & Write a Syllabic Poem

There are only four times in 2022 that we get a fifth week with a Tuesday: March 29, May 31, August 30, and November 29. I thought it would be fun to try something different. For this #TankaTuesday challenge, share your day with us. Take a photo to share and write a syllabic poem of your choice.

I’m excited about this exceptional year of poetry! Do you know that if you take part in each challenge, you will have 52 poems! How cool is that? Sounds like a delightful book of poetry!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 252 | #PhotoPrompt

The Holiday’s are Approaching

Books are splendid gifts to give for the holidays. I’ve read a few articles which said print books are taking longer to make and Amazon is trying hard to keep up with demands. Shop early and order soon. Support your community writers. I know I am! Email me if you have a poetry book I can add to our #TankaTuesday Poetry Book Store! Please support our community poets and buy someone you love a book for the holidays. 📚 ❤️

Word Weaving #1: A Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse (Kindle) purchase link

The Moons of Autumn: A Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse (print) purchase link


Image Credit: Butterfly on Asters by Lisa Smith Nelson

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our syllabic poem inspired by the image above, using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Veera9.Cheryl17.Kerfe
2.Reena Saxena10.The Versesmith18.Goutam Dutta
3.ladyleemanila11.Harmony Kent19.theindieshe
4.Padre12.Eugenia20.Ruth Klein
5.Trent McDonald13.Balroop Singh21.kittysverses
6.willowdot2114.Jules22.Francis-The Frenchie
7.s. s.15.Gwen Plano 23. Writer Ravenclaw
8.Selma16.wildchild47 24. Literature World

Please remember to add your link to Mr. Linky, so I don’t have to add you manually to the recap. Thank you. 🙏🏻

Your poetry was so impressive this week. I asked you to look beyond the obvious and you did! Some of you used your third eye to find the magic in the image. Thank you again to Lisa for selecting such an inspiring photo. Here are a few that really caught my eye:

Kerfe’s watercolor and haibun are full of magic. She shares some information about nature and complimentary colors that made this piece extra special. Notice how the haiku talks about another facet of the image? It’s perfect!

Sangeetha found magic in this photo!! She shares a romantic take on the image.

Wildchild47 used the photo to find inspiration in other ways. This is a good approach if a prompt doesn’t inspire you. Don’t be afraid to use a prompt as a stepping stone to more inspiration. Check out her imagery!

This week, I chose Balroop Singh’s tanka poems to feature. Balroop’s recent exploration into haiku and tanka has really paid off. I liked where her words took us, inspired by the image of the asters and the butterfly.

Intoxicated 
by nature’s nectar I thrive
Let me drink till dusk
kisses the sky and reminds you:
we are hypnotized by life

***

You took the sunshine;
alone I carve a new path
through the dark caverns
to gather tattered remnants
of dreams and grim emotions

© Balroop Singh

This week, I’ve asked Balroop Singh to choose the prompt for our last photo challenge of 2021. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

I’ve done the work of researching these syllabic forms for you. Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available as an Ebook and a Print book. mybook.to/WordCraftProsePoetry Let’s write syllabic poetry together! <3

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!