#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 243 | Synonyms Only: “Family & Peace”

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. Many thanks to Ruth Klein’s Scribbles for choosing the words this week. This week’s challenge was to choose synonyms for the words, “family & peace,” using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, chōka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, diatelle, the Kerf poetry, and any of the syllabic forms from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.ladyleemanila7.Gwen Plano13.D.G. Kaye
2.Selma8.Jules14.Jude
3.willowdot219.Kerfe15.theindieshe
4.Annette Rochelle Aben10.Kevin Harp16.Sally Cronin
5.Cheryl11.Frank J. Tassone17.Jane Aguiar
6.Ruth Klein12.anita dawes 18. YOU’RE NEXT

Wow! There was so much great poetry this week using synonyms for the words, family and peace. Plenty of new forms to try, as well!

I especially liked the words quietude and blended brood from Annette Rochelle Aben’s Abhanga poem. Ruth Klein used kinfolk, genetics, and truce. These are only some examples. You’ll want to read the other poems to see how creative synonyms can be.

Why do we choose synonyms for the words? Because it forces us to select words with a deeper meaning. When we write syllabic poetry, we want to convey our message so that we connect with our readers. If we’d only used the words family and peace, we would all have poetry that sounded the same, with the same meaning. It’s a great way to spice up your poetry.

This week, I chose Willow Willers to choose the words for next month’s #SynonymsOnly challenge. I especially like the message in her Etheree this week. Although Etheree poems are not meant to rhyme, sometimes the words just come out of us that way.

we
bluster
and bemoan
the shortcomings
of extended clans
while calming the waters
others raise fires with their fans.
will things come to a bloody pass?
or tranquility encompass us?
and so relations we will be, war free

© Willow Willers

This week, I’ve asked Willow Willers to choose the prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Jules and I are excited to share the cover of the First Edition of Word Weaving, a Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse. The Kindle copy will be available for preorder on September 1, 2021, for delivery on October 1st, 2021. The print edition will release October 1, 2021. The proceeds from this journal will go to fund a Poetry Contest on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry to be announced at a later date. Click HERE to preorder.

Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 243, #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Are you ready to choose some syllables to use in your syllabic poetry this week? Ruth, from RuthKlein’s Scribbles, selected your two words:

Family & Peace

On the Monday recap, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme. For this poetry challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the cheatsheet OR from the forms found on Poetscollective.org.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

Sodacoffee.com/syllables

A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

The RULES

Write a poem by finding synonyms for the two words above. Don’t use the two words! You can craft a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheatsheet OR from Poetscollective.org. It’s time for us to branch out! BE creative and try new forms. Make sure you follow the directions on how to write the form. Don’t forget to tell us what form you chose.

Post it on your blog.

Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).

Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

Don't forget

If you add hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on social media:

Search #TankaTuesday to find the tweets! Add a # to the form you wrote in the title.

Jules and I are excited to share the cover of the First Edition of Word Weaving, a Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse. The Kindle copy will be available for preorder on September 1, 2021, for delivery on October 1st, 2021. The print edition will release October 1, 2021. The proceeds from this journal will go to fund a Poetry Contest on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry to be announced at a later date. PRE-ORDER HERE.

Stay in touch! Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 31 – PEACE & TEAR

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

THANK YOU FOR THE BIRTHDAY POETRY! TO SHOW MY APPRECIATION, I REBLOGGED YOUR POSTS. THESE WERE THE BEST PRESENTS EVER! ❤

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. All hyperlinks are purple and I’ve underlined as many as I could. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

The haiku is a Japanese verse in three lines. Line one has 5 syllables, line 2 has 7 syllables, and line three has 5 syllables. Haiku is a mood poem, and it doesn’t use any metaphors or similes. 5/7/5.

Wikipedia explains:

“”Haiku” is a term sometimes loosely applied to any short, impressionistic poem, but there are certain characteristics that are commonly associated with the genre:

  • a focus on some aspect of nature or the seasons[1][2]
  • division into two asymmetrical sections, usually with a cut at the end of the first or second section, creating a juxtaposition of two subjects (e.g. something large and something small, something natural and something human-made, two unexpectedly similar things, etc.)
  • a contemplative or wistful tone and an impressionistic brevity[3][4][5]
  • elliptical “telegram style” syntax and no superfluous words
  • imagery predominates over ideas and statements, so that meaning is typically suggestive, requiring reader participation
  • avoidance of metaphor and similes
  • non-rhyming lines

Some additional traits are especially associated with English-language haiku (as opposed to Japanese-language haiku):

  • A three-line format with 17 syllables arranged in a 5–7–5 pattern;[2][a][6][7][8] or about 10 to 14 syllables,[9][10] which more nearly approximates the duration of a Japanese haiku[11] with the second line usually the longest. Some poets want their haiku to be expressed in one breath[12][13][14]
  • little or no punctuation or capitalization, except that cuts, are sometimes marked with dashes or ellipses, and proper nouns are usually capitalized.”

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click PUBLICIZE to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 30th POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – WISH & MAGIC: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 30 – Wish & Magic | Ladyleemanila

Happy Birthday, Colleen! #Tanka Tuesday – Reena Saxena

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #30 – Wish & Magic – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #30 – Wish & Magic/Two on a Rant

Wishing – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic 2 Birthday

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic/Edwina’s Episodes

She’s still mad at me – Playing with words

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 30 – Wish & Magic | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Happy Birthday Colleen | The Syllabub Sea

Colleen’s poetry challenge#30-wish & magic (Tanka) – Uniquesus

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 – Wish & Magic/Stuff & What If?

Time Paradox: NaPoWriMo | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Magic Wings | method two madness

Desire (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

Wishing (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

#Poetry challenge #30# Tanka# wish & magic – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

NaPoWriMo Day 22: Earth – My Feelings My Freedom

No Magic Answers | Faith Unlocked

Indistinguishable | Faith Unlocked

Up River/Word & Image Collages

“The Celebration” – A Haibun – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s Poet of the Week is me! I figure I can share my Haibun once a year on my birthday. I hope you will enjoy. I wrote it to honor Earth Day, which was celebrated on April 22nd, worldwide.

The Celebration – A Haibun

As the sun kisses my face, I reach my arms toward the brightness of the pale blue sky. The festival is nigh. Today is Earth Day, and I feel mother Gaia firm and fertile under the crusty snow beneath my feet. There is a coolness to the springtime breeze that drifts around me like a mist filled with ancient memories. The scent of marsh grasses fills my soul with a yearning that cannot be quenched. I feel the old magic here. I pause and wait. My only wish is to feel its warm embrace.

Meadow fairies call
from their dark caves down under
while magic roots stir
new growth surrenders
lamenting the cold spring snow

A flock of Lark Buntings takes wing filling the sky with their dark shadows. Startled, I turn and stare at the thick brown cattails as they rattle and shake from the bird’s departure in the shallow arroyo. My enchantment is complete while the sound of their avian voices echoes in my heart. Yes, the old magic is here and another season is mine to keep.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: PEACE & TEAR

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

RonovanWrites Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt Challenge #36 Field&Beacon: The Field

ronovan-writes-haiku-challenge-shadow

Ron, of Ronovan Writes sponsors this great weekly Haiku challenge.  Check him out!  Click here to learn more about creating Haiku in English.

The Field

I love poetry and haiku Find more of Silver’s haiku and poetry by clicking this photo on her blog.

Thanks for stopping in for a chat!  You can find me here too:

Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/silverthreading

Twitter at https://twitter.com/ColleenChesebro

Pinterest at http://www.pinterest.com/collie333/

Bloglovin’ at http://www.bloglovin.com/silverthreading

Google+ at https://plus.google.com/u/0/+ColleenChesebro/posts

Silver Threading signature

Peace Through Kindness

forpeace6

EverydayGurus.com

Each month, I ask myself, “How do I promote peace?”

The topic of “world peace” seems so broad and intimidating.  It really does not have to be unless we let it seem so daunting that we are unable to grasp its true meaning.  Do not look at the broad picture only.  Keep carving the meaning of peace down until you have something that you can hold on to that helps you define what peace truly means to you.

This month, I want to promote peace through the kindness of ourselves and how we act toward other people.  Kindness in words is a big deal to me.  You can destroy a person with only a few words.  We in the WordPress blogging community are actually quite kind to each other, offering inspiration, hope, and a sense of caring.  Great.

Now, how do you treat the members of your family?

2014-10-06 00.26.26

In my opinion, peace in a family is attainable by recognizing that each person brings something unique to the family unit.  We are not all alike by any means.  Just because our genes are shared within a family does not mean that we are all the same.  Our differences make us human and loveable.  When judgments or perceptions against each other are shelved and forgotten, that is when peace silently slips into your home.  You do not even notice until you sense the quiet.

Be Kind

Peace obtained through kindness is an easy task.  Say, “please,” and “thank you,” to each other.  Mind your snarky/funny comments by keeping them in perspective so that you do not do more harm than good to your family members.  Take responsibility for your actions and do not blame others for your own mistakes.

Create peace in your family by loving each other – flaws and all.  Be willing to change.  That is the key.

Thanks for stopping by today.  I enjoyed our chat,

Silver Threading

SilverThreading Logo

Pain & Peace

Ronovan Weekly Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes at http://ronovanwrites.wordpress.com/2014/08/25/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-prompt-challenge-rewind-7/#like-4383 came up with a great challenge this week.  Our two words are:  Pain and Peace

If you want to refresh yourselves on a bit of Haiku in English, although you do not have to stick to that particular style of Haiku, it’s just my particular style to use, click here.

For Tips and Guidelines refreshers click hereEVERYONE IS WELCOME TO JOIN OUR WEEKLY HAIKU CHALLENGE!  COME ON… TRY IT OUT!

Sorrowful memories –

photographs stuck in time

Old reconciliations.

How Do I Promote Peace?

This post is in response to the Bloggers for Peace monthly challenge found at http://everydaygurus.com/2012/12/20/we-can-make-a-difference-right-here-right-now/.

This video shows how we can promote peace at a level starting with our selves and our family.  Take small steps and think of ways that you too can begin a dialog that promotes peace.

2014-07-24 22.48.52