WEEKLY POETRY CHALLENGE STARS | No. 194 – #SynonymsOnly: David Ellis, @TooFullToWrite

Annette Rochelle Aben picked a great pair of words for us all to work with this week for our #SynonymsOnly challenge: HINT & BOLD.

Once again, you’ve all outdone yourselves! There was such great poetry and all different kinds, as well. Bravo to you all! Here’s everyone who joined in courtesy of Mr. Linky:

1.Reena Saxena11.jaye marie21.Dora
2.willowdot2112.Jude22.D.G. Kaye
3.Kim13.Myforever. blog23.s. s.
4.Gwen Plano14.Cheryl24.Vashti Quiroz- Vega
5.Trent McDonald15.Donna Matthews25.Pat R
6.Padre16.D. L. Finn26.Mehar Ali
7.kittysverses17.Ruth Scribbles27.David Ellis / Too Full To Write
8.Dave Madden18.Goutam Dutta28.Marsha Ingrao
9.Elizabeth19.theindieshe29.
Colleen Chesebro
10.Jules20.Linda Lee Lyberg 30. Ada’s Poetry Alcove

This week I selected David Ellis from his blog, Too Full to Write to pick the syllables for next week’s challenge.

Congratulations, David Ellis, it’s your turn to pick challenge name for next month’s challenge. Please Email me your choice at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com before next month’s syllables only poety challenge.

David wrote a Nonet series poem, which incorporates a Double Inverted Nonet, and a regular Double Nonet as well. It’s an interesting combination. It just goes to show that you can experiment with these forms to create longer multi-verse poems. Don’t be afraid to experiment.

David made this a found poem. He says:

“Since the theme for the challenge is “Hint & Bold” this week, I have used the poem, “Love” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge as my own inspiration, with its bold hints of luscious wordplay throughout.”

You can read Samuel’s sumptuous and divine poem over here: “Love” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge over at Poetry Foundation

“A Maiden Voyage” © David Ellis
A Found Nonet Series Poem
Inspired by “Love” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Our
Passions
Stirs, delights
Feed waking dreams
Blended with hope, art
Amid lingering light
Songs that make moving story
Wild with grace, burning long and deep
Pleading love, with eyes that fondly flame
This lovely day, beautiful and bright
Stealing the scene, dear friend, again
Gentle wishes, lay beside
Tending to impulses
Music, rich, sacred
Interpreted
Soul and sense
Against
Heart
The tenderest of words are mortal
Modest, guileless, from hopes we choose
They love us best, when we sing
When we stood and listened
Madness went away
Fears long subdued
Ruin, rested
Conscious
Calm
Swells
Voice, name
Starting up
Happy again
Sorrows could not last
The mountain there was crossed
A maiden voyage, well wooed
All are unknowing, when midway
Embrace what won pride, with tears of joy

I’m so excited! I’ve got a huge surprise for you! I’ll be hosting a poetry challenge for the Carrot Ranch Literary Community’s 2020 Rodeo challenge on October 13th here on Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry. This will be a judged event with a $25 prize from Carrot Ranch!

Just so you know, we’ll skip our Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge on October 13th, but we will resume October 20th. Mark your calendars! Carrot Ranch will fill the entire month of October with fun writing challenges for you to enter on different blogs, and on Carrot Ranch.com.

Here’s the 2017 Challenge Winners, the 2018 Challenge Winners, and the 2019 Challenge Winners (aren’t posted yet).

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

Colleen’s 2020 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 164 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the second week of the month! That means Synonyms ONLY! I’ll pick a the two words for you to write about for this month. On the Monday before the next challenge, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s two synonyms.

Here are your two words:

Love & Harmony

PLEASE don’t forget to support the other poets by visiting blogs and leaving comments. Peer reviews help poets perfect their writing craft. Remember… sharing is caring.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet:

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

THE RULES

Every Tuesday I’ll post the challenge early enough so everyone can see it. Remember, there will be no recap. You have a full week to complete your poetry. Only syllabic poetry: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Gogyohka, Tanka, Haibun, Cinquain, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma

The rules are simple. Write your poetry on your blog.

Do a link-back by placing the HTTPS:// address of the challenge post into your post. Also, please copy your poem and add it to the comments. If you created a Haiga, you can post it in the comments. To add a photo in WP comments copy the URL from your media file where you uploaded the image to your post, and paste it in the comments. Now, all of the poetry ends up on the challenge post in one place.

Follow the schedule listed below:

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


#Haiku & #Senryu Poetry Forms

Now that I’ve got the 2019 Poet of the Week Compilation sorted, I wanted to talk more about writing and creating Haiku and Senryu in English with the traditional rules and what I call the “current” rules. Read my post here: 5/7/5 vs 3/5/3 & 2/3/2 Haiku & Senryu Styles for more information.

My challenge post for this week is Poet’s Choice, so this gives me an opportunity to go over the different forms.

HAIKU IN ENGLISH is written in these forms: Traditional form 5/7/5, Current 3/5/3, and Current 2/3/2 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about season changes, nature, and change in general.

I’ll write a Haiku in each form to illustrate. First 5/7/5 – traditional form:

white veiled clouds cluster
against a pale winter sky
the cold front arrives

Same Haiku in 3/5/3 current form:

white clouds drift
against a pale sky
cold rolls in

Haiku in 2/3/2 current form:

clouds drift
in pale sky
cold day

I will always be a traditional Haiku and Senryu writer. However, look at the evolution of this poem. I can see why many poets believe the 3/5/3 and 2/3/2 form better illustrate Japanese Haiku. The brevity is stark! One of the reasons I love the traditional style is because of the extra syllables. It allows the poet to share their experience by showing and not telling.

SENRYU IN ENGLISH is written in these forms: Traditional 5/7/5, Current 3/5/3, and Current 2/3/2 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and should have irony present.

I’ll write a Senryu in each form to illustrate. First 5/7/5 – traditional form:

Strumming my guitar
a love song slips from my lips
she’s found a new love

Same Senryu in 3/5/3 form:

guitar strums
love song serenade
my love leaves

Senryu in 2/3/2 form:

guitar 
serenade
love lost

Once again, the brevity of words is profound in the evolution of the three Senryu. The irony of singing a love song when your lover leaves you for another does come through in the meaning of each version.

How you decide to write your Haiku and Senryu is up to you. I prefer to write in a more traditional form, but my challenge will accept any of the three forms.

Review the differences between Haiku and Senryu:

Get busy and write some syllabic poetry!

© Colleen M. Chesebro and colleenchesebro.com, 2014–2022. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Colleen M. Chesebro: wordcraftpoetry.com.

“The Prophecy,” A Flash Fiction/Senryu

I’m combining my Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge, using synonyms for “love and time, with the Carrot Ranch Literary Community August 16, 2018, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about a comet. I used the words “continuum” for time, and “benevolence,” for love.

The comet streaked across the sky dragging a fiery tail against the inky blackness. Dennitsa shivered in the gathering gloom. Her dreams of late had been infiltrated by the ancestors revealing the prophecy this celestial nomad heralded. Time was running out.

The old ways of healing-magic were in danger. Today, the Byzantine priests had instituted a plan to hunt down and kill the fairy witches, thus performing a cleansing upon the land.

Ripples of magic exploded from the woman’s form silhouetted against the night sky.

Her spirit calls out—

the continuum answers,

benevolence found.

The solution came from above.

***

© 2018 Colleen M. Chesebro

Images: Creative Commons Pixabay.com

Hugs for stopping by! <3

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 97, “Love & Time,” #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

HELP ME grow this challenge. Please SHARE, REBLOG, or use PRESS THIS. <3 Thank you.


Opportunities for Poets

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Radarpoetry.com welcomes unsolicited submissions of poems during our reading period of October 1 through June 30.  

During the months of July, August, and September, we read and administer the Coniston Prize and are open to prize submissions only.  Please see the contest page for details.

Guidelines

Please read the guidelines carefully as they have recently been updated.

We recommend you read our issues to get a sense of our aesthetic before sending your workWe only accept poems only through our submissions managerPoems sent by email will be deleted.

Submit 3-5 original, previously unpublished poems in a single document. We read blind, so please ensure there is no identifying information on the document that contains your poems. You should include a cover letter and a brief bio in the comments boxWe welcome translations as long as all necessary rights have been secured by the translator.

We accept simultaneous submissions and ask that you notify us right away if your work has been accepted elsewhere. For partial withdrawals, simply add a note to your entry on Submittable. We do not accept multiple submissions.

We respond to each submission within a month, and often much sooner than that. After 30 days have passed, feel free to query us. You can also report and track your submission through Duotrope. Unless you are specifically invited to send more work, please wait 6 months after before submitting again.

Former contributors should wait one calendar year after the publication of their poems before submitting again.

We secure first serial rights for poems we publish. Upon publication, all rights revert to the author. We are proud to nominate our contributors for major awards including the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. We ask that all contributors cite Radar Poetry should their poems be published elsewhere in the future.

We look forward to reading your work!

~*~

Thrushpoetryjournal.com – a journal of poetry that will appear 6 times a year. ( January, March, May, July, September, and November)

We believe in showcasing the best work we receive. We will present a select number of poems per edition.

Submissions are now open. We read submissions on a rolling basis. We are not a paying market.

Submit previously unpublished work only. If you are sending us work that appears on your website, blog, or a self-publishing site, please remove it prior to submitting to us. Send us no more than three poems, pasted in the body of an email, preceded by a cover letter. If your poem requires special formatting, you may then, and please only then, also include an attachment.

Please indicate “POETRY SUBMISSION” on your subject line. Submissions without “Poetry Submission” in the subject line will be deleted unread.

Include a bio (all bios are subject to editing). Also include a URL to your blog or website, if applicable. Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but not preferred. If your work is accepted elsewhere please inform us immediately.

We aim to respond to all submissions within 10 days of receipt (usually less). We will not respond (accept or decline) with a form letter and we will comment on poems whenever possible.

Please wait a minimum of six months between submissions

If your work is accepted at THRUSH, you agree to grant us First North American Serial Rights, all archival rights, plus the rights to reprint in any future anthologies. Upon publication, all rights revert back to the author. You agree that if your poem/s subsequently appears elsewhere (in print or online), you will give due credit to THRUSH.

Our taste is eclectic. We want poems that move us, a strong sense of imagery, emotion, with interesting and surprising use of language, words that resonate.  We want fresh. We want voice.

Established and new poets are encouraged to submit. Experimental poetry is fine, randomness is fine also. However, we do not want experimental and random just for the sake of calling it such. No long poems. We prefer a poem that will fit on one page. We are not interested in inspirational poetry or philosophical musings.

Submissions that ignore these guidelines (or parts of these guidelines) will likely be declined immediately.

We nominate for most major prizes. See our Awards page

Our guidelines are subject to change. We suggest reviewing them prior to submitting.

Submissions and other correspondence should be sent to:  editorthrushpoetryjournal@gmail.com

~*~

One Sentence Poems: Now Seeking Submissions

As their name suggests, One Sentence Poems is an online literary journal publishing poems composed of a single sentence.

A project of Ambidextrous Bloodhound Productions and a relative of the literary journal Right Hand Pointing, One Sentence Poems has been publishing a new poem every Tuesday through Saturday since 2014. You can get a sense of their style by reading the poems they publish online.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions all the time. They respond to all submissions, usually within two weeks. After they accept a poem, they publish it online in the following few weeks.

Poets may submit up to four single-sentence poems of at least two lines. In other words, each poem must have at least one line break. They publish poems in any form, though they prefer left-justified poems and usually don’t care for scattered forms.

Each poem must consist of one complete and grammatically correct sentence. That means it must begin with a capital letter and end with a terminal punctuation mark. Using semicolons to connect sentences is cheating. Long sentences are fine, but a reader should be able to speak the poem in one breath.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions online, but not via post or by email. They do not accept previously published work.

If you would like to learn more or submit to One Sentence Poems, please visit their website at http://www.onesentencepoems.com/osp/how-to-submit/.

 

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

I sponsor this challenge to help poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of SUNDAY, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

 I have also been sharing your poetry on my Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Please feel free to FOLLOW, LIKE, & SHARE from my page. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: “Love & Time,” #SynonymsOnly

Have fun and write some poetry!

“Isn’t Love, Just Love?” – A #Haibun #Haiku

Welcome to my contribution to my Weekly Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of “hate and pride.” I used the word “love,” loosely based on the word “pride.”


Image Credit: Pixabay.com

I have never understood why people feel the need to debate the power of love. Why should this even be an issue? Why make up the rules of love to only be shared between male and female of the same race or culture? We readily accept the love shown to us by our animals but turn up our nose when two men or two women love each other. Isn’t love just love?

Those that say they are “in the know” like to preach about love. Love thy neighbor as you would love thyself. Their rhetoric echoes with empty words they do not comprehend. Do as I say, not as I do. Wait… Isn’t love just love?

Pride in who you are fosters dignity and self-respect. Follow your heart. Love and be loved. Fight the stigma and the hate. True love comes when you least expect it. Don’t stop the healing energy of love from entering into your life because it doesn’t meet someone else’s definition of love. After all, isn’t love just love?

Hate finds a discourse –
songs of love silenced for now,
where is our outrage?

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Image credit: Pixabay.com

My haibun does not exactly meet the rules since my prose and Haiku are directly related. Usually, the poetry should reflect some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. The poetry should be a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected. When the muse strikes, go with your gut!

Thanks for stopping by. See you next week.

Spice – The Tiny Dog Who Stole Our Hearts

Spice, Colorado 2017

It is with sad and heavy hearts Ron, and I must share that our beloved Spice left this world Wednesday night. Spice was Ron’s dog mainly, and along with her sister, Sugar, nursed Ron through bladder and prostate cancer. She was loyal and loving and will live in our hearts forever. Our lives were better because of her sweet soul. 

When Ron found her in her crate that morning, her tag had become lodged in the metal grate of the door. It appeared she couldn’t get it loose. She was diagnosed with a collapsed trachea many years ago and at 13 ½ years old, she had been having more problems. In dog years she was 91, spunky, yet frail. I can only hope and pray that her passing did not allow her to suffer.

Both dogs had been crate-trained for ‘sleeping only’ since they were born in Montana. For such an odd thing to occur breaks our hearts. Her sister, Sugar is lost without her. The dogs had only been separated twice for overnight stays at the vet. Sugar suffers from diabetes and is frail too. The first thing I did was take Sugar’s collar and tag off.


Sugar & Spice 2011, Montana

Our pain is inconsolable. We got these two magnificent girls in 2004 when they were 4 months old. Spice was the runt of the litter, and sugar was a roly-poly fluff ball. My husband had only months before undergone radical surgery for bladder and prostate cancer. He spent the days alone while I worked many long hours as a bookkeeper/estate paralegal. I knew the two dogs would require him to get up out of his chair and give him something to care for. It worked. The life came back into his eyes, and he was ready to experience life again.

How do you thank two little souls for giving you the most precious things in life: loyalty, unconditional love, and kindness? From the day we got them in May 2004, they have filled our lives with joy.


Sugar, Ron, and Spice, Florida 2015

I have struggled with the writing of The Meadow Fairy and wasn’t sure why. I am an empathic writer, and there has been so much unrest in the world. These things affect me deeply. It seemed that certain things had to happen in the universe and in my life in order for me to add them into Abby’s new story. I don’t question how or why this happens any longer. I just wait, and then, I write.

Yesterday, I knew that the only way I could pay tribute to our beloved girls was to write them into the story so they could remain immortal on paper. In this way, their personalities will shine and spread love and joy to others.

Spice’s ashes will come back to us so that we still have a bit of her with us. Her spirit has joined the collective, and I know we will see her again, in another place, and time.

Love,

Ron and Colleen


Love, A Moral Compass – A Haiku

Thanks for stopping by. I’ll see you soon. <3

READ MORE ON SILVER’S MONTHLY FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my sign up page and enter your email. <3

A Mother’s Day Lament

A secret has been mine forever to keep

In a deep dark void a place of no sleep,

I bury the longing for my mother’s love

She left me quite early and ascended above.

***

I stumbled through life without her touch

Wondering and yearning if I resembled her face,

Hoping and wishing she’d help me find my place

Always longing for my mother’s love.

***

My own children have come and gone

Left me for their own dreams in the sun,

I find through the years the ache is still there –

I still long for the touch of my mother’s love.

~*~

Mother’s Day is a celebration of the love between mothers and their children. It is also a time when we must remember those who never knew their mothers or those who have never had children. Their pain is real and never goes away. Instead, it dulls and remains a hungering ache to surface at certain days of the year.

I send you peace and love.