#Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Stars: #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our poetry using one of these forms: (haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, cinquain and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga poetry) inspired by Trent McDonald’s photo shown below:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA: Image credit: Trent McDonald

Remember… the first of the month you can write any syllabic poetry form of your choice. The rest of the time, we write our syllabic poetry in one of the forms listed, and we follow a schedule (posted below).

I do this for a couple of reasons. It requires those who would like to enter contests or to submit their poetry to literary journals to learn how to follow their rules. This challenge gives you that practice. Besides, why enter a challenge if you don’t follow the rules? That’s the challenging part. ❤

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Cheryl 9.TJS Sherman 17.Vashti Quiroz- Vega 
2.ladyleemanila 10.anita dawes 18.Ruth Klein aka Ruth Scribbles 
3.Gwen Plano 11.Elizabeth 19.kittysverses 
4.Eugenia 12.sangeetha 20.Sally Cronin 
5.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr 13.Balroop Singh 21.Kerfe Roig 
6.Jules 14.theindieshe 22.
7.Trent McDonald 15.Jude   
8.Padre 16.Marsha   

The challenge this week explored Ekphrastic writing inspired by visual art (photographs). When you write poetry based on a painting or photograph, we work with symbolism and metaphors. I asked everyone to not just describe what they saw in the image. I suggested we check out How to Write Ekphrastic Poetry and learn how to apply some techniques used in that article to our own poem.

I think you all did that and more! Photo prompts always bring out some of the best poetry and you guys did not disappoint! A few of these poems really stood out. Please check out:


Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr


TJS Sherman


sangeetha


Jude
 


Sally Cronin


anita dawes

Kerfe Roig’s poem, “Cascade,” was outstanding. This Badger hexastich says it all with only a few words. Kerfe captured the essence of the waterfall. I felt the poem was a metaphor for living life to the fullest. Well done!

Painting by Kerfe Roig
"Cascade"

falling
gravitating
sheer and continuous
sparkled currents rising
in reflection
flowing

© Kerfe Roig

This week, I’ve asked Kerfe Roig to choose the photo for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Don’t forget to connect with the Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse at wordweavingpoetryjournal.com to learn the theme of this first journal.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

TANKA TUESDAY POETRY STARS | Poets choice no. 209

Hello from snowy Michigan!

What a tremendous success our first poetry challenge of 2021 was! Bravo to those of you who tried a new form and taught us how to create it! Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.ladyleemanila10.Padre19.Goutam Dutta
2.Trent McDonald11.Zander20.theindieshe
3.Tina Stewart Brakebill12.D. L. Finn21.Vashti Quiroz- Vega
4.Dave Madden13.s. s.22.Marsha Ingrao
5.Jules14.anita dawes23.M J Mallon
6.Ritu Bhathal15.Jude24.Kerfe Roig
7.willowdot2116.Gwen Plano25.Ruth
8.The Versesmith17.Cheryl  
9.Donna Matthews18.kittysverses  

Kerfe Roig’s poem, “Renderings,” using the Badger Hexastitch form caught my attention. This form is syllabic and written in six lines with a 2/4/6/6/4/2 structure. It is unrhymed with optional rising and falling end-words, which I think is an interesting twist.

I re-
turn to the earth
reflected as shadow–
silhouette echoing
the places I
have been

©2021 Kerfe Roig

The optional rising and falling end-words often refer to the intonation or rhythm of speech. I also believe from the examples that the rising and falling end-words often end in “ing,” but not always. (See the second poem below). This is a made up form and sometimes that makes it difficult to understand what the creator intended.

Another explanation for the rising and falling end-words could be simply writing a definite beginning and end where everyone can interpret the meaning, like in the third poem below. Kerfe used a similar interpretation, beginning with “I re-” [return] and ending with “have been.”

Or, the rising and falling end-words could be opposites, like in the first poem below:

"Growing"

Fall down
consider tears--
crawl to where grandpa sits
grab onto grandpa's leg
grin like a fox--
stand up

© Lawrencealot - February 16, 2014
reading,
rooted in mind,
not tasting ripe berries,
the oozing summer scent,
window open,
waiting

~~Phil Wood
First flight,
small granddaughter
visits Grandma with Dad,
Mom, brother and sisters
in soccer play-offs
back home.

--Judi Van Gorder

This is a fun form to experiment with. The syllable count has a pleasant rhythm. This year, Word Crafters, we will have a list of optional forms to choose from, including the twelve forms we’ve been using for the last few years. I’ll add the Badger Hexastitch to that list, which I will publish soon.

See you tomorrow for Tanka Tuesday!

WEEKLY TANKA TUESDAY POETRY CHALLENGE STARS | #SYNONYMSONLY

Each week our challenge has a twist and this week it was to find synonyms for the words: “imagine & gratitude.” Kat Myrman selected some fine words. Congratulations to all the poets who participated. You are all stars!

Here’s everyone that joined in:

1.Padre 7.Dave Madden 13.Kerfe Roig 
2.Trent 8.Cheryl 14.Donna Matthews 
3.willowdot21 9.Goutam Dutta 15.M J Mallon 
4.Jules 10.anita dawes 16.Linda Lee Lyberg 
5.Kat 11.Elizabeth Adams 17.Pat R 
6.Larry Trasciatti 12.s. s. 18.

Shadorma poems seem to dominate the stage this week. There were so many great poems. I could barely choose just one poem.

Ultimately, I went with Kerfe Roig‘s shadorma, “VETERANS DAY NYC 2020” There was a poignancy there not only for Veteran’s Day, but for the whole of 2020. Kerfe’s word, “ghost-boots” lends imagery to her words. I could hear the ghostly clicking of heels marching down the street in formation. This shadorma really touched my heart.

Congratulations, Kerfe, it’s your turn to pick the synonyms for next month’s challenge. Please Email me your choice at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com before next month’s challenge.

VETERANS DAY NYC 2020

salutes spaced
between vehicles–
ghost-boots march
silently
in formation—echos caught
in mind’s eye–the tears

©2020 Kerfe Roig

Kerfe adds:

“As with seemingly every celebration in 2020, the Veteran’s Day parade today here in NYC was largely symbolic–”a caravan of 100 vehicles with no spectators”–a shadow of the usual ceremony of 20-30,000 participants.”

source: https://kblog.blog/2020/11/11/veterans-day-nyc-2020/

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

The Results ARe IN For the Winner of the Carrot Ranch Double Ennead Poetry Challenge

For this year’s rodeo, I created a special poetry form called the Double Ennead. The word Ennead means nine, and a double nine is ninety-nine! Carrot Ranch is famous for 99-word flash fiction. Finally, the ranch has its own syllabic poetry form written in 99 syllables!

The Double Ennead comprised five lines with a syllable count of 6/5/11/6/5, (33 SYLLABLES per stanza) 3 STANZAS EACH = 99 SYLLABLES, NO MORE, NO LESS!

The twist in crafting the Double Ennead was that poets had to choose five consecutive words from the poem, “The Springtime Plains,” from Cowboy Poet, Charles Badger Clark, found at the link below:

https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-springtime-plains/

The five words had to be reworked into one stanza following this word placement:

Line 1 starts with word 1

Line 2 ends with word 2

Line 3 starts with word 3

Line 4 ends with word 4

Line 5 starts with word 5

Today, I can finally announce the winner of the Carrot Ranch’s 2020 Writing Rodeo Event #2, which I had the honor of managing.

There were twenty-four poems submitted from all genres including comedy, western, romantic, and even a fantasy poem. Our two judges studied the poems for several days before selecting a winner. It was a tough choice.

The Double Ennead was not an easy poem to craft, and each of you who took part stepped up to meet the challenge. You are all stars!

Please proudly display this badge on your website. You earned it, and I’m proud of all of you!

Here is our winner:

“Some Places Have No Names,”

by Kerfe Roig

Her five words from the poem, “The Springtime Plains,” were: “…summering sun that comes galloping…” found in the first stanza of her poem.

You can find Kerfe Roig’s magnificent Double Ennead poem at https://carrotranch.com/rodeo-contests/2020-rodeo/ where our head buckaroo, Charli Mills, has compiled the winners of the Writing Rodeo events.

Again, congratulations to the winners and to everyone who entered. I hope you all continue to craft poetry!

I’d like to add my special thanks to the amazing judges,

Jane Dougherty and Merril D. Smith.

Weekly Poetry Challenge Stars | Theme Prompt #188

Many thanks to Sue Vincent, who gave us an amazing theme to work with this week:

“Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth.”

Herman Hesse

Thank you for all of your hard work! Your poetry was amazing! I want to share a few highlights because we learn so much from each other!

Check out these poems:

Elizabeth from Tea & Paper I love what’s not said in this in tanka. The reader draws their own conclusions.

Sue Vincent She reveals the mystery of the trees.

Frank Tassone Shares an unknown form for most of us called a kyoka! It’s a relative to the tanka. I’ll have to investigate this one in more detail.

Here’s who joined in via Mr. Linky:

1.Jude9.Sue Vincent17.theindieshe
2.Padre10.Amit Agrawal18.Merril D. Smith
3.Trent McDonald11.anita dawes19.Colleen Chesebro
4.Elizabeth12.Jules20.Linda Lee Lyberg
5.willowdot2113.Kim21.Annette Rochelle Aben
6.Dave Madden14.Pat R22.Sally Cronin
7.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr15.Kerfe Roig23.Frank J. Tassone
8.s. s.16.anita dawes24.Vashti Vega

This was a hard challenge to only pick one poet to highlight. I selected Kerfe’s poem, “The Chorus of Everywhere,” because of the powerful imagery in her words.

Each stanza leads you to a different thought. The poem features a beginning, middle, and an end which serves as the climax. Sequence, shorter form poetry is perfect for arranging your thoughts so each stanza flows into the next and defining your theme.

This shadorma sequence is all about our own awakening, as she includes a sincere appeal to stop and take notice of our world. When you read the poem, you feel the truth of her words resonate in your soul.

Congratulations, Kerfe Roig, it’s your turn to pick the theme for next month’s challenge. Please Email me your choice at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com before next month’s challenge.

"the chorus of everywhere"

stop making
maps—destinations
are without
meaning—this
journey does not follow roads
to faraway lands

look around
at the familiar
landscape—light,
water, stone,
the patterns of trees joining
wings to earth and sky

listen to
the stillness of no
time—listen–
suspend all
expectations—what you need
is already here

©2020 Kerfe Roig

source: the chorus of everywhere

SEE you tomorrow for the new challenge!

Weekly Poetry Challenge Stars | Specific Form ~ Haibun

Image credit: © Frank J. Tassone

What an amazing collection of haibun poems this week. I want to thank Frank J. Tassone for the lovely image of Gertrude’s Nose. What a great photo!

Mr. Linky has made finding the poems so easy now. I’m tickled with the results. Here is everyone who joined in:

1.Padre8.Jules15.theindieshe
2.Kim9.Pat R16.Kerfe Roig
3.Trent McDonald10.s. s.17.H. R.R. Gorman
4.Linda Lee Lyberg11.kittysverses18.Merril D. Smith
5.willowdot2112.Sue Vincent19.Sally Cronin
6.joem18b13.Jude20.Marsha Ingrao
7.Frank J. Tassone14.anita dawes  

The haibun is such an expressive form. The prose portion allows you the freedom to write with all of your senses as in autobiographical prose, a travel journal, a slice of life, a memory, a dream, a character sketch, a place, an event, or even an object. Haibun that focus on one or two elements are the strongest.

Remember:

The length of your haibun can be brief with one or two sentences with a haiku, or longer prose with a haiku sandwiched between, to longer memoir works including many haiku.

There are different Haibun styles: Idyll: (One prose paragraph and one haiku) haiku/prose, or prose/haiku; Verse Envelope: haiku/prose/haiku; Prose Envelope: prose/haiku/prose, including alternating prose and verse elements.

Your prose tells the story and gives the information which helps to define the theme. It creates a mood through tone, paving the way for the haiku.

The haiku should act as a comparison—different yet somehow connected to the prose, as it moves the story forward by taking the narrative in another direction.

The haiku should not attempt to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the haiku resolves the conflict in an unexpected way. Sometimes, the haiku questions the resolution of the prose. While the prose is the narrative, the haiku is the revelation or the reaction.

So, this week, I want to share a few haibun poems that met the mark!

Frank J. Tassone’s haibun read like a travel adventure. Notice how he wove his haiku in between the prose paragraphs. This is an example of the prose envelope (prose, haiku, repeating until the end). Each haiku increases the tension in the poem until we reach the very end and learn that this adventure was a cherished memory. Excellent work!

Kerfe Roig, shares an example of a verse envelope haibun (haiku, prose, haiku). She uses Frank’s image as a metaphor (on the verge) by describing a personal journey. Notice how the haiku adds to her prose by adding another layer of meaning to the poem?

H.R.R. Gorman’s haibun reads like a fantasy novel or dream sequence. She used the prose envelope (prose, haiku, prose) to tell a story like no other. The ending of the haiku leaves the reader filled with surprise!

Sally Cronin’s haibun is another great read! She wrote this haibun in the style of an Idyll (one prose paragraph and one haiku). The ending of this haibun was also a surprise!

Congratulations to all of you that wrote haibun poetry this week. You’re all stars!

Don’t forget, I’m looking for syllabic poetry examples to link to in the citations in my new book. If you’re interested, read HERE and follow the instructions. Thanks in advance.

See you tomorrow for a new challenge!

Weekly Poetry Challenge Stars | Challenge #173 – Synonyms Only: Idea & Fancy

Hello, everyone! Finally, my house painting project has ended. My husband and I are both worn out, but we beat the heat! The highs in Phoenix this week will climb into the nineties, which means it’s time to turn on the air conditioning. I want to thank everyone for putting up with my late comments and lack of content in the last month. I appreciate you all!

I had fun thinking up the two different prompt words for everyone to find synonyms to use for their poetry. Our words were idea and fancy. Your poetry was amazing… as usual!

This week’s winner is Kerfe Roig, featuring her Shadorma, “Unexpectations.”

Congratulations, Kerfe, it’s your turn to pick the two prompt words for next month’s Syllables Only challenge. Please Email me your choice at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com before next month’s challenge. Thanks.

The frontside

Unexpectations

all is dis
order, from concept
to whim—in
side random
patterns I hide the stitches,
untamed by surprise

©2020 Kerfe Roig

The backside

source: K. Lines that aim to be

Kerfe employed a few literary devices into her poetry that caught my eye. Did you notice how she split the word, “dis-order?” That immediately gave me the feeling of chaos, which was the emotion she wanted to convey. She repeated this technique when she used the word “in-side.” That repetition reinforces the disorganized or displaced feeling that originates from chaos.

I also loved her choice of stitching circles onto the scraps of handmade paper. The circle has special symbolism. Remember, when writing poetry not everything needs to be conveyed with words only. When you use symbolism to communicate your thoughts, the reader peels away the layers of meaning, uncovering a few surprises along the way from their own interpretations.

Click HERE to read about the symbolism of the circle.

The circle also represents protection, inclusion, and wholeness, which nicely contrasts the idea of chaos. Maybe Kerfe stitches the circles because she finds solace in the circular nature of the form, creating a poetic metaphor we can all relate to.

The last lines in Kerfe’s Shadorma: “…inside random patterns I hide the stitches, untamed by surprise.” Don’t her words scream out to you? I feel like she is asking where is the normalcy?

Let’s talk about it! Tell me in the comments what you get out of this poem.

Learn more about using literary devices in your poetry writing HERE. Not all of these devices are used in syllabic poetry, but you’ll be able to tell which ones to use in no time!

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mention, No. 153, “Grace & Style,” #SynonymsOnly

Gobble, Gobble… It’s time to read some fabulous poetry!

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the Poet of the Week and the honorable mention poetry that deserved another read. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Hi everyone. I’m really thrilled about how easy it was for us to see everyone’s poetry in the comments. It’s an extra step again, but it allows everyone to see each other’s poetry in one place – attached to the challenge post. Thanks to Sally Cronin for such a great idea!!

Let’s continue to add our poetry to the comments. Remember… as of January 2020 I won’t be doing a weekly recap. I’ve got lots of fun heading our way, so keep taking part in the challenges. ❤

I approve all comments and linkbacks to my blog. If you are a regular visitor to my blog, your link shows up, even if I haven’t approved it.

If you are new to my blog, your comment will have to wait to be approved. Depending on where you live, that could be an eight hour or more time difference from my location in Arizona. I schedule my posts around midnight so my followers from around the world have an opportunity to see them in a timely fashion. Don’t panic.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! I gave you all some tough

Please visit the challenge post comments HERE, where you’ll find the links to everyone’s poetry. Stop by and say hello! ❤

I will publish the Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone can grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week who has shared an exceptional message or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception. You may not feel the same way about my choice. That’s okay. Perception is different for all of us.

The Poet of the Week

This week, I’ve chosen H. R. R. Gorman for his double Etheree, “Mama Grace,” to be the Poet of the Week.

The Etheree is a wonderful choice for when you want to tell a tell a story using a syllabic form. Combine two together (Etheree & reversed Etheree) for more impact.

H.R.R. tells us the story of Mama Grace, using synonyms for the challenge words. I feel the fragility of humanity through his choice of words (deaf, dumb, poor, barren, etc.). He grabs the raw and gritty realities of life and splashes them on the page like secrets released in whispers.

There’s a cultural element to his words that show us more than tell us that Mama Grace lives in the south. This adds an old world charm to the theme of the poem.

Mama Grace

She
Lived
With aplomb
Despite trouble
With her sister’s son.
Her sister was deaf, dumb,
And didn’t want pregnancy.
But poor thing didn’t have a choice,
So barren sister Grace took in the boy.
She raised him with joy, with love, with honor.
But he lived in the vein of his father,
Took the mantle of rapist himself,
Then was carted off to prison.
“You spoilt him,” cried folks at church.
“It’s your fault,” they accused.
She couldn’t fight back.
She made some pink
Lemonade,
Sipped,
Cried.

©2019 H.R.R. Gorman

Honorable Mention(s)

Kerfe gets the honorable mention this week for her triple Shadorma, called “Blessings.”

There is something powerful about combining more than one form at a time. I like three verses or poems because it gives you a beginning, a middle, and an end. However many stanzas you decide to choose, make them count!

Kerfe says this poem is about birth and her words reflect that theme. I especially like how each stanza flows into the next until answering the eternal question, “what creates these seas of hope?”

Blessings

consider
the reckless places
hidden in
hearts, shining
like newborn constellations
exploding the dark–

pulled apart
by merciless force,
undefined
gravities–
adrift in the orbits
of recurrent night—

what creates
these seas of hope?–light
ships sailing
on longing–
circumnavigations of
storms searching for ports

©2019 Kerfe Roig

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mention, No. 149, #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the Poet of the Week and the honorable mention poetry that spoke to me. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Hi everyone. I’ve been battling some health issues of late that affect my typing skills. Don’t panic if I don’t get to your poetry link right away.

I approve all comments and linkbacks to my blog. If you are a regular visitor to my blog your link shows up even if I haven’t approved it.

If you are new to my blog, your comment will have to be approved. Depending on where you live, that could be an eight hour or more time difference from my location in Arizona. I schedule my posts around midnight so my followers from around the world have an opportunity to see them in a timely fashion. Don’t panic. I get to all the comments as soon as I can.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! Last month’s Photo Prompt, Poet of the Week, Diana Peach gave us all an interesting image to work with. Thanks for the great image!

The image is from Pixabay, by Michael Seibt

I thought there was so much going on aside from the moody swamp-like appearance. How many of you saw the snake (or asp) and the poppy? Did you notice the reflection of the (alien faery, sprite, elemental, lizard, etc.)? What about the colors? What kind of mood did you perceive? Color is inspirational. What did the color green mean here? What kind of mood does this image portray?

Did you visit the challenge post comments? Click HERE to find the links to everyone’s poetry. There were some amazing responses this week. Stop by and say hello!

I will publish the Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone can grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

As you know, each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, and who has shared an exceptional message or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception. You may not feel the same way about my choice. That’s okay. Perception is different for all of us.

Remember the Poet of the Week for the Photo Prompt picks the image for the November middle of the month challenge. Who will it be?

The Poet of the Week

This week, I’ve chosen Linda Lee Lyberg as the Poet of the Week. Linda spotted the snake in the image and actually wrote a love inspired butterfly cinquain, which surprised me. This week we all saw (or felt) something different. Linda saw love. How marvelous is that?

Linda…

Please, email me your photo pick for the November 19th Middle of the Month Poetry Challenge

The Flutist, #Butterfly #Cinquain

And if
my music tames
and quells your urge to strike
will you slither into the cool
green sea
with me and we’ll float in mossy
dreams, falling, falling deep
love’s mystery
revealed

©2019 Linda Lee Lyberg

Read this weeks’s Poet of the Week! The Flutist https://charmedchaos.com/2019/10/18/the-flutist/ via @charmedchaos12

Honorable Mention(s)

Kerfe Roig saw the green! Her Haiga (and artwork) reflect the “greenness” of the image. We don’t always have to reiterate what is visible in these images. Sometimes the creativity is found in what is not seen. Don’t be afraid to think outside of the box.

FOR FUN: Click HERE to learn more about the color green!

Green, #Haiga

©2019 Kerfe Roig

Joe M. found the humor in the image. His Senryu made me laugh! I felt like this poem was a Senryu because of the last line. There’s a bit of irony in those words. Also, it seemed like the words talked about a personal event. What do you think?

Haiku, #Senryu

no tips in the hat
dude we’re in a freakin swamp
this gig is the pits

©2019 Joe M.

It’s my favorite time of the year! Stay tuned for tomorrow’s new challenge.

Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mention(s), No. 147, #PoetsChoice

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the Poet of the Week and poetry that I felt deserved an honorable mention. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! Please visit the challenge post comments HERE, where you’ll find the links to everyone’s poetry. Stop by and say hello! ❤

I will publish the Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone can grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.


Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week who has shared an exceptional message or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception. You may not feel the same way about my choice. That’s okay. Perception is different for all of us.

I love to see your creativity bloom each week, but never more than the beginning of the month. This is where many of you shine—untethered by word choice, you march to your own poetic drums. This week was no exception. Bravo to all the participants.

The Poet of the Week

This week, I’ve chosen Kerfe Roig as the Poet of the Week for her Haiku poem featured below. Why is this poem a Haiku? Because the poet discusses the subject of change. Haiku poetry is written about nature, seasonal activities, or change in general.

I like this Haiku, also for the message. The words are simple yet they’re packed with meaning. I like the way word image/grid poetry looks. The typeset of the words adds to the allure of the image. I could see this piece framed and hanging on a wall. It’s a real attention-getter.

Could this image and Haiku form a Haiga? The poem stands alone independent of the collage image. I think the piece falls into the observational poetry category as a Haiga. What do you think? Let me know in the comments.

©2019 Kerfe Roig

“October 2019,” #Haiku by Kerfe Roig

who you are connects
the transit of where you are
to the shape of next

©2019 Kerfe Roig

Honorable Mention(s)

My next selection is an Etheree poem from Donna Matthews. She summed up Halloween in 10 simple lines. Her words flow smoothly as the reader conjures each creature she imagines. Night terrors, anyone?

“Frankenstein, et al.,” #Etheree by Donna Matthews

ghosts
goblins
dark shadows
mummies stirring
Frankenstein’s monster
werewolves and vampires
black raven’s razor-sharp beaks
creatures of the dark rising up
to unleash their fury in your dreams
trapped in the ancient fear of night monsters

©2019 Donna Matthews

Autumn reveals her beauty to us with different shapes and colors around the world. Jane Dougherty shares a Tanka poem that gives us a peek into her world.

“Changing Light,” #Tanka, by Jane Dougherty

soft pastel colours
wash the dry dust of summer
with broad water strokes
streaked and striped with silver rain
soft as new grass green-growing

©2019 Jane Dougherty

Are you ready to write some poetry? The new challenge is up tomorrow! See you there!