Haiku

I love haiku. They are one of my favorite syllabic forms to write. This haiku is written for #TankaTuesday and the specific form challenge.

Haiku are written about nature, the seasons, a beautiful moment in nature, an emotional experience while in nature, or change. In haiku, your subject will always be about nature.

The use of a kigo (season word) is optional for this challenge. However, traditionally, a haiku must include kigo (season words) and a kireji (cutting word).

There is no exact equivalent of kireji in English. The kireji (or pivot) should supply structural support to the verse. At the end of a verse, it provides an ending, completing the verse with a heightened sense of closure. That is why it is often called an “a-ha moment.” The pivot connects the two images in an unusual way. When writing haiku, we should create two independent thoughts that compare or contrast.

Bring the images down to the barest of information. That is the brevity we always talk about. Use simple, and plain descriptive language.

Haiku does not deal with generalizations. Haiku is not philosophical; they are stark, disciplined, and to the point. The idea is to capture a mindful moment in time and memorialize it with your words.

When you create haiku, think in images. We’re creating a haiku with two images that connect in some strange way.

a bright night—
shadows of wet snow
veil the street

© Colleen M. Chesebro

This haiku shares two images: a bright night, and the shadows of wet snow. You know how bright a night can look when the moon shines with snow on the ground. The contrast is the wet snow or gray slush. It looks like shadows on the street. The slush veils the street, not completely covering it. It’s the contrast between the two images, light and dark, that is memorable.

That is how simple it is to write a haiku. Take two images, compare or contract them, and find that pivot line to make us remember your haiku.

Eugi’s Weekly Prompt: Journey

Your Weekly Prompt – Journey – Sept. 2, 2021

I’ve jumped into Eugi’s prompt this week. She says: “This prompt will be mostly unmoderated. Please keep it family friendly. Disrespectful and inappropriate comments will be removed. This needs to be a safe and fun space for all. There will be no Roundup.

Go where the prompt leads you and publish a post on your own blog that responds to the prompt. To participate, link your blog to mine with a pingback. To do a pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of the URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s prompt. It can be any variation of the prompt and/or image. 

time traveler—
the long journey home
spirit calls

© Colleen M. Chesebro

#TankaTuesday: #PhotoPrompt – haiku

It’s the hottest it’s been in Michigan this summer. When I walk in the morning, I can smell Autumn right around the corner. Cheryl picked out the best photo for our challenge this week.

Timeanddate.com shares:

The Perseids are one of the brighter meteor showers of the year. They occur every year between July 17 and August 24 and tend to peak around August 9-13.

timeanddate.com
falling stars—
flashes of promise
for a new day

© Colleen M. Chesebro

My latest book will have you crafting poetry the same day. Here is a recent review:

D. W. Peach reviewed May 25, 2021: This book is a must-have for writers of syllabic poetry. Chesebro has the experience and credentials to have crafted this easy to follow and detailed look at twelve forms of Japanese and American syllabic poetry, as well as their variations. Styles range from the well-known haiku and tanka to the less familiar gogyohka and etheree. Though written for poets beginning their exploration of these beautiful forms, I learned quite a lot (and I’ve been writing several of the forms for years).

Chesebro’s explanations not only include the technical aspects of each poetic form, but a quick history, the style’s creative intent, and tips for finding inspiration and writing. These aspects of each poetic form are conveyed in a concise manner, and each section is followed by examples of her poetry and the poetry of authors I’ve enjoyed for years. The poems not only illustrate the preceding lesson but are beautiful in their own right.

The quality of this book and its citations make it useful as a “text book” on the craft of writing syllabic poetry, appropriate for academic settings. Chesebro’s conversational style, easy to understand explanations, and poetic selections also make it accessible to a wide range of learners. The book’s format lends itself to lesson-planning for young poets.

Highly recommended to poets who are just starting out or who’ve been writing for years. An excellent learning tool filled with wonderful examples of the forms.

You can find my books here: Amazon Author Page

Daily haiku ~ the river

summer clouds—
kayakers floating
the river

© Colleen M. Chesebro

I’m with the grand-dogs this weekend on the Grand River. It’s always so beautiful and peaceful here.

I’m working on haiku imagery. The idea is to connect emotions by associating two or more images together in strange and unusual ways. It’s not as easy as it sounds. I find it is always best to look for alike, or contrasting images to feature in your poem.

In the haiku above, I targeted the “summer (my kigo) clouds” and the “kayakers floating the river,” definitely a summer activity. Clouds float – kayakers float, which are alike images.

A haiku should present an event in an image. It should SHOW us what happened without telling us about it or what emotion to feel. In the haiku above, what emotions do you feel?

Haiku poems share a specific event or observation. Haiku are not generalities, and we never use a simile or metaphor.

Most haiku are written in seventeen onji (Japanese sounds) which equates to around twelve syllables (3, 5, 3).