TANKA TUESDAY POETRY CHALLENGE STARS | #PhotoPrompt, The psychology of color

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to choose synonyms for the words, “loose and tight,” using one of these forms: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Renga, Solo-Renga, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, Badger Hexastich (hexastich for short), and Abhanga.

Remember… the first of the month you can write any syllabic poetry form of your choice. The rest of the time, we write our syllabic poetry in one of the forms listed, and we follow a schedule (posted below). I do this for a couple of reasons. It requires those of you who would like to enter contests or to submit your poetry to literary journals to learn how to follow their rules. This challenge gives you that practice. Besides, why enter a challenge if you don’t follow the rules? That’s the challenge part. ❤

ALSO: Make sure you are grabbing the URL of your “published” post when you link back to the challenge and in Mr. Linky. If you need extra help with these features, let me know and I will help you. ❤

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below and to Mr. Linky’s Magical Widgets:

1.Reena Saxena10.Tina Stewart Brakebill19.Zander
2.ladyleemanila11.Ritu Bhathal20.Ruth Scribbles
3.Henry Chukwuma12.D. L. Finn21.M J Mallon
4.Padre13.Colleen Chesebro22.D.G. Kaye
5.Jude14.Eugenia23.G.R. MELVIN
6.s. s.15.Cheryl24.kittysverses
7.Gwen Plano16.willowdot2125.Sally Cronin
8.Trent McDonald17.Jules26.
9.theindieshe18.Anita Dawes  
Image by Michael Bußmann from Pixabay

This week, I asked you all to use the psychology of color in your poetry. Using color provokes strong imagery, engaging your brain to react to the symbolism. We write poetry to connect with the world around us. The addition of color helps us choose words to convey a deeper meaning.

Think about the color blue. This hue can be warm and comforting, while it can also signify coldness. Don’t forget about the act of feeling “blue.” Just that one word (one syllable) helps to convey a range of emotions.

There were some exquisite poems this week, so please visit the other poets to read their poems. The Badger Hexastich seems to be a popular form. Please read Sally Cronin’s poems HERE to get an idea of how your words and syllables should flow smoothly with meaning when using this form.

Those short syllables can be choppy, as I illustrated in my poem. I did this to emphasize the lack of emotion the color gray can invoke. When you compose your poetry, think about your reader’s reactions to your words.

I also like Jude’s haibun senryu. In the haibun portion he writes each sentence separately, like a verse, instead of in a paragraph. He stays true to the Japanese form, but adds his own personalization to it.

Check out his word choice. Desdemona is a character from the Shakespeare play, Othello. Just the mention of her name invokes a kind of gray sadness as the beautiful and innocent wife of Othello who meets a tragic end. This is excellent imagery.

I chose D.L. Finn’s tanka poem below to highlight this week. I enjoyed Denise’s creativity. The first three lines convey a specific theme: the angel’s gift. The last two lines pivot, and she gives direction to her poetry by sharing her reaction to seeing the gift. The pivot was a surprise! The imagery is precise, yet doesn’t share too much by saying she “…saw the soul of the world.” What does that mean to you?

This week, I’ve asked D.L. Finn to choose the photo for next month’s #Photo Prompt challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

THE GIFT

The angel’s gift shone
Like a rainbow umbrella
In a vile gray world.
Curious, I approached her
And saw the soul of the world.

©2021 D.L. Finn
Origami, another Japanese art form!

See you tomorrow for another fun syllabic poetry challenge!

WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 213 #EKPHRASTIC #PHOTOPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the third week of the month! Time for an Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

This challenge explores Ekphrastic writing inspired by visual art (photographs). I selected the image for this month’s challenge, but I’ll choose someone from the recap to pick the image for next month.

Hello Word Crafters! I believe I fixed the problem with WP and the interactions with the Safari browser. It was partially theme related, and partially Safari related.

Although I didn’t choose a painting this week, I want you to write your poetry using the psychology of color. You can take the image at face value, choose a specific color in the rainbow umbrella to write about, or write about the lack of color. However, you interpret this image is up to you… just make sure to incorporate the psychology of color.

For the Tanka Tuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet (click the link below):

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

writerlywords.com/syllables/

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

This site does the hard work for you. It’s up and working again.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Renga, Solo-Renga, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, Badger hexastich, and Abhanga. The first of the month challenge, you can write whatever syllabic form you choose, but not this challenge.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your published post link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #Solo-Renga, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #BadgerHexastich, #Abhanga


Have fun and write some #photoprompt poetry!

WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 203. #EKPHRASTIC #PHOTOPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the third week of the month! Time for an Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

This challenge explores Ekphrastic writing inspired by visual art (photographs). I’ve selected an image for this week’s challenge.

I’ve always loved watercolors. There is something special that speaks to me from the muted and surreal colors and brush strokes. I especially connect with scenic images featuring humans and wildlife—especially birds! Write your syllabic poetry based on the image below.

Image by Barbara A Lane from Pixabay

If you want to be creative and feel up to an additional challenge, respond to my renga with your own two, seven-syllable lines. A renga is a cooperative poem, written by two or more poets.

I’ve written the hokku (haiku portion in 5/7/5). Your response to my hokku is the wakiku: two seven-syllable lines that connect with the interaction between the different links.

Remember, your renga stanza will link and shift. It will NOT tell a sequential story. Review the renga on the cheatsheet link below to refresh your memory.

Here is the hokku:

hazy reflections—
crows gather to remember
the gifts of summer

Your response to my hokku is the wakiku: two seven-syllable lines that somehow connect with my hokku.

Remember, your renga stanza will link and shift. It will NOT tell a sequential story. Review the renga on the cheatsheet link below to refresh your memory.

For the Tanka Tuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet (click the link below):

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

writerlywords.com/syllables/

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Renga, Solo-Renga, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, and Shadorma. Please try to only use these forms.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy the link of your published post into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #Solo-Renga, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

So, Word Crafters… who wants to have fun and write some poetry?


WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 203 #EKPHRASTIC #PHOTOPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Buying and selling a house cross country is stressful! Things are moving forward as usual. We had one full price offer on our house, but they wanted us out in two weeks!! I said no-way!

We have found a couple of houses in Michigan and bid on them, but not high enough. I have two more picked out, so we shall see how that proceeds. Fingers crossed. Wish us luck. ❤

It’s the third week of the month! Time for an Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

This challenge explores Ekphrastic writing inspired by visual art (photographs). Diana Peach from last month’s challenge has provided the photo for this month’s challenge:

On the Monday before the next challenge, I will pick a poem from this week’s challenge and share it on my blog. Whoever I pick will choose the photo for next month’s challenge! Email your selection to me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com a week before the challenge. Please include the photo credit and the link to the photographer. Thank you!

For the Tanka Tuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet (click the link below):

Here are some impressive sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

writerlywords.com/syllables/

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, and Shadorma. Please try to only use these forms. The first of the month challenge, you can write whatever syllabic form you choose.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #Solo-Renga, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

So, Word Crafters… who wants to have fun and write some poetry?


COLLEEN’S 2020 WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 199 #EKPHRASTIC #PHOTOPROMPT OR #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Since we skipped last week’s challenge for the Carrot Ranch Double Ennead Poetry Challenge, we’ll combine two challenges this week!

You can choose the Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt provided by Trent McDonald, or you can choose the #SynonymsOnly challenge using the words “MOVE & MAKE” provided by David Ellis.

OR… You can do both! It’s up to you

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA: Milford Pond

Here are the two poems submitted to the Carrot Ranch Double Ennead Poetry Challenge that were done for done for fun!

You remember the Double Ennead was 99 syllables long, with three stanzas of 6/5/11/6/5 syllable count. The tricky part was choosing the five consecutive words from the poem, “The Springtime Plains,” by Charles Badger Clark, that had to be used in the following order in one of the stanzas:

  1. Line 1 starts with word 1
  2. Line 2 ends with word 2
  3. Line 3 starts with word 3
  4. Line 4 ends with word 4
  5. Line 5 starts with word 5

The first poem is from Jules:

"Professional Courtesy Implied"

(*five consecutive words “Watching me pass with impish” 1st Stanza)

Watching the world go by
alone tis just me
Pass to the right or left at this forest fork
just my lonesome self with
Impish grin, I dance

I stole a hot cross bun
From the bakery
Will the baker notice the shamrock I left?
I think it was fair trade
Breakfast for some luck

If he would have some faith
His luck might just turn
Then perhaps his pastries wouldn’t scorch or burn
Too much time complaining
‘Bout his early hours

©JP/dh

The next poem is from Padre:

"Dusty Wind"

‘is blown from the sky’ from “The Springtime Plains,” by Charles Badger Clark

Is that the dusty wind
that from West has blown?
From places turbulent and forlorn it comes.
My mood darkens as the
sky is thus obscured.

Dust, my dry nostrils fill.
Sand gets in my eyes.
So fine is the powder, that I cannot block
its bite, no matter how
I might dodge or try.

Lord, let this wind die down.
Let the sun return.
I would rather sweat and have a sunburned face,
than my mouth filled with sand.
Lord, it’s in your hand.

©2020 Padre's Ramblings

I want to say a HUGE bravo, for Jules and Padre for attempting this new syllabic form. Well done, to both of you! Many thanks to everyone else who entered the Carrot Ranch Poetry Challenge.

On the Monday before the next challenge, I will pick a poem from this week’s challenge and share it on my blog. Whoever I pick will choose the photo for next month’s challenge! Email your selection to me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com a week before the challenge. Please include the photo credit and the link to the photographer. Thank you!

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet (click the link below):

Click HERE

Here are some impressive sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

writerlywords.com/syllables/

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

I don't get it

THE *NEW* RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, and Shadorma.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

Are you missing my poetry challenge posts? Search for me in the WordPress Reader or…

Subscribe to my Weekly Blog Update Email. By clicking submit, you agree to share your email address with Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry to receive marketing, updates, and other emails from colleenchesebro.com. Use the unsubscribe link in those emails to opt out.

So, who wants to have fun and write some poetry?


WEEKLY POETRY CHALLENGE STARS | Photo Prompt #195: Trent MacDonald

Lisa Thompson’s photo selection sure set off our imaginations! There was a fabulous amount of poetry and all of it was different. I enjoyed reading and commenting on your poems. ❤

Congratulations to everyone for joining in and writing poetry! Here’s who joined us via Mr. Linky:

1.willowdot21 10.Elizabeth 19.Linda Lee Lyberg 
2.anita dawes 11.Jules 20.kittysverses 
3.Padre 12.D. L. Finn 21.Marsha Ingrao 
4.Kim 13.theindieshe 22.Colleen Chesebro 
5.Trent McDonald 14.Dolores 23.Ruth Scribbles 
6.lisa thomson 15.s. s. 24.M J Mallon 
7.Reena Saxena 16.Donna Matthews 25.Pith & Piffle Poetry
8.Myforever. blog 17.huwanahoy   
9.Cheryl 18.Goutam Dutta   

I called this challenge Ekphrastic, because it explores writing inspired by visual art (photographs). What this means is that we use the photo to inspire our poetry.

When you use a photo for inspiration you should ask yourself questions about the photo. What does it remind you of? What is it? It’s your perceptions that matter when you write your poem.

For example, a toadstool reminds me of magic! To someone else, it could represent poison, or the evils in the world. Your poetry should speak to some sort of connection (or experience) you had with the art work. Brainstorm ideas and write them down. Use those initial responses to craft your poetry.

Remember the Japanese Poetry forms have definite rules to follow when you choose those syllabic forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, and tanka prose. Refer to the poetry cheatsheet HERE if you are not sure of the rules. Some of these forms are difficult but don’t let that hold you back. Keep practicing. That’s how we learn and get better.

The American syllabic versions: cinquain, and cinquain variations, Etheree, nonet, and shadorma have much looser rules to follow, but nevertheless, they also have rules. The cheat sheet is the best way to go.

This week I selected Trent McDonald’s haiku. He explored the three haiku forms: traditional (5/7/5), current (3/5/3), and the shorter of the current (2/3/2). When you write haiku, you don’t have to write your poem in all three of these forms. We sometimes do it for this challenge as a way to show the evolution of syllables compared to the traditional vs. the more current versions. It shows how easy it is to write a shorter form version of a haiku.

Remember, the shorter syllable forms (s/l/s) are usually what poetry journals are looking for. This is because they believe the shorter forms most closely match the Japanese forms. It all has to do with sounds in Japanese. vs. English. The Haiku in English form (5/7/5) is much longer than the Japanese ever intended the haiku to be written.

Congratulations, Trent McDonald, its your turn to pick the photo for next month’s Photo Prompt Ekphrastic challenge. Please Email me your choice at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com before next month’s challenge.

a bit of fungus
a tower in fairyland
both visions are true

-or-

fungus rot
fairyland tower
point of view

-or-

fungus
fairyland
toadstool

©2020 Trent McDonald

source: https://trentsworldblog.wordpress.com/2020/09/15/toadstool-haiku/

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!