#Tanka Tuesday Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 229, #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Welcome! Check out the NEW main menu item: Poetry Book Publishing Links to find poetry book publishing links, including links to literary journals and poetry magazines accepting submissions of poetry. If you know of a link to add to this list, let me know by email to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. ❤

It’s the second week of the month! Are you ready to choose some syllables to use in your poetry? Gwen Plano from last month’s challenge picked your two words:

“Dawn & Twilight

On the Monday recap, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme words.

For this poetry challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the cheat sheet:

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

Sodacoffee.com

A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

I don't get it

The RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo-renga, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, and Abhanga. Don’t forget the optional forms HERE.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

Don't forget

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on social media

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma #Gogyohka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #SoloRenga, #BaxterHexastich, #Abhanga


SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN

The Word Weaving Poetry Journal is accepting entries of syllabic poetry. Learn more HERE.

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


“All Forgiven in a Day,” #kindku “Dawn”

I’ve wanted to try this new poetry challenge offered by Auroras & Blossoms poetry journal in the post below. It’s the “Dawn,” Prompt, created by Cendrine & David.

Here is the link to the words in the song: https://genius.com/Leigh-nash-nervous-in-the-light-of-dawn-lyrics which serve as the inspiration for the poetry you write.

First… What Is a Kindku?

Auroras & Blossoms says:

The Kindku is an invitation to promote kindness, positivity and inspiration through poetry. As the last two letters of the name indicate, it is based on Japanese poetry forms like the haiku and tanka.”

The Rules

The Kindku is a short poem of seven lines and 43 syllables. The syllable pattern is 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 or 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5.

The Kindku must include seven words that are taken from one specific source — a poem, a book, a newspaper article, etc. In the case of a book or long piece of writing, those words must come from the same page.

Words must be used in the order they were found. Their placement also depends on the line:

  • Line 1 starts with word 1
  • Line 2 ends with word 2
  • Line 3 starts with word 3
  • Line 4 ends with word 4
  • Line 5 starts with word 5
  • Line 6 ends with word 6
  • Line 7 starts or ends with word 7

Kindku poems can have titles and punctuation. No matter the topic covered, they must sport a positive tone.

Kindku poets are encouraged to credit and link to the inspirations behind their pieces.

First, I listened to the song and then picked the seven words: “…storm grey clouds hovering above silence all…” (Nervous in the Light of Dawn lyrics)

Next I created a chart using the 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 syllable count:

  • First line: 7 syllables: start with “storm”
  • Second line: 5 syllables: end with “grey”
  • Third line: 7 syllables: start with “clouds”
  • Fourth line: 5 syllables: end with “hovering”
  • Fifth line: 7 syllables: start with “above”
  • Sixth line: 5 syllables: end with “silence”
  • Seventh line: 7 syllables: start with “all”

I use the syllable counter at How Many Syllables.com to compose my KindKu.

Image by Albrecht Fietz from Pixabay

“All Forgiven in a Day,” #kindku

storm erupts with feral song
dawn shifts into grey
clouds swell like waves in the sea
pale brume hovering
above the fray, the rainbow—
redeems the silence
all forgiven in a day

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

What do you think? By participating in the challenge, they could select your poem to appear in the Aurora & Blossoms Journal. Click HERE for the prompt post.

This was a fun challenge! It really got my creative juices flowing. Try it!

The Clinic Photo Rehab #3–Red Dawn

Red Dawn

Many thanks to Lucile De Godoy, for hosting her Photo Rehab Clinic.  This is my contribution for the week.  A storm is approaching from the west here in Pensacola, Florida,  and the dawn sky was glorious this morning.  I love how the pink sky tinted the grasses in the field behind the now infamous, “horse-hole.”  I could not totally capture the rose-colored sky in all its glory, so this will have to do.

There is an old saying:

Red sky in morning, sailor take warning.

Red sky at night, sailor’s delight.

The NOAA Global Monitoring Division, as quoted from their website has an explanation:

RED SKY IN MORNING, SAILOR TAKE WARNING:

“This old saying actually has a scientific explanation. It relates to moving high and low surface-pressure weather systems, and the way that the colors in sunlight are scattered differently by dirty and clean atmospheres. This is the explanation of how these phenomena combine to color our sunrises and sunsets.

If you look at a global map of surface pressure, you will see a string of alternating high-pressure and low-pressure areas.  That is because pressure patterns are relative; i.e., if a region of lower pressure exists, it must have higher pressure on either side.

Low pressure is associated with bad weather (sailor take warning), and high pressure with good weather (sailor’s delight). Low pressure causes air to converge (to try to “fill” the low), and converging air causes upward motion, which in turn produces clouds and precipitation.

In contrast, air diverges from the center of a high-pressure area. This causes downward motion, which suppresses cloud formation.

A temperature inversion (temperature increasing with height) forms at the level of the troposphere where this downward motion is strongest. This happens because downward-moving air experiences higher pressure as it descends and thus is compressed. According to the laws of physics, air heats when it is compressed. Vertical motion is inhibited at the level of the inversion; thus dirty air containing suspensions of soot, dust, and other particles (known as aerosols) is trapped near the surface.”

RED SKY AT NIGHT, SAILOR’S DELIGHT:

“So, atmospheric conditions in a high-pressure area are typically cloud free and dirty, and those in a low-pressure area are cloudy and relatively clean (fewer aerosols).

Light from the sun is made up of the colors in the rainbow, which correspond to different wavelengths of radiation.  The blues are made up of short wavelengths and the reds of longer wavelengths. The radiative properties of a dirty atmosphere differ from those of a clean atmosphere. That is because light from the sun is scattered differently by air molecules than by aerosols (which are relatively larger). Air molecules scatter the shorter wavelengths more efficiently, and that is why the sky is blue!

Dust or aerosols scatter the longer wavelengths (red light) more efficiently, and most of that light is scattered in the forward direction (the direction in which the light is moving). Also, at sunrise and sunset the sun’s rays travel through a long path of atmosphere, so these scattering processes are very efficient at those times. Therefore, sunlight traveling through a long path of dirty atmosphere at sunrise or sunset is made up of primarily the reddish wavelengths when it reaches the observer (e.g., look at the color of smog in Los Angeles or Denver). A cleaner atmosphere at sunrise or sunset is colored by a mixture of all but the blue colors, giving it a yellowish appearance.”

Now you have the science behind the adage. Picture yourself on a ship in the middle of a mid-latitude ocean. There the wind (and thus storm paths) is from west to east. It is morning and you are watching the sunrise. It is red. Since it is morning you are looking east, and the red sky indicates that there is high pressure there. Because you are in the mid-latitudes, the high is moving eastward–away from you. That could only mean that a low, and very likely an associated storm, is moving toward you from the west.  Sailor take warning! Now picture yourself watching the sunset from the ship, and the western sky is red.  That means that an area of high pressure is to your west, the westerlies are moving it toward you, and good weather is on the way–sailor’s delight!

Note that this only works in the belt of westerlies, from about 30 degrees to 60 degrees latitude in both the northern and southern hemispheres. The region 30 degrees on either side of the equator is characterized by easterlies (the trade winds). This adage would be opposite in that region.”

photo_101_rehab_widget_small

Check out Lucile’s Clinic here.

Silver Threading signature

The Clinic Photo Rehab #3–Red Dawn

Red Dawn

Many thanks to Lucile De Godoy, for hosting her Photo Rehab Clinic.  This is my contribution for the week.  A storm is approaching from the west here in Pensacola, Florida,  and the dawn sky was glorious this morning.  I love how the pink sky tinted the grasses in the field behind the now infamous, “horse-hole.”  I could not totally capture the rose-colored sky in all its glory, so this will have to do.

There is an old saying:

Red sky in morning, sailor take warning.

Red sky at night, sailor’s delight.

The NOAA Global Monitoring Division, as quoted from their website has an explanation:

RED SKY IN MORNING, SAILOR TAKE WARNING:

“This old saying actually has a scientific explanation. It relates to moving high and low surface-pressure weather systems, and the way that the colors in sunlight are scattered differently by dirty and clean atmospheres. This is the explanation of how these phenomena combine to color our sunrises and sunsets.

If you look at a global map of surface pressure, you will see a string of alternating high-pressure and low-pressure areas.  That is because pressure patterns are relative; i.e., if a region of lower pressure exists, it must have higher pressure on either side.

Low pressure is associated with bad weather (sailor take warning), and high pressure with good weather (sailor’s delight). Low pressure causes air to converge (to try to “fill” the low), and converging air causes upward motion, which in turn produces clouds and precipitation.

In contrast, air diverges from the center of a high-pressure area. This causes downward motion, which suppresses cloud formation.

A temperature inversion (temperature increasing with height) forms at the level of the troposphere where this downward motion is strongest. This happens because downward-moving air experiences higher pressure as it descends and thus is compressed. According to the laws of physics, air heats when it is compressed. Vertical motion is inhibited at the level of the inversion; thus dirty air containing suspensions of soot, dust, and other particles (known as aerosols) is trapped near the surface.”

RED SKY AT NIGHT, SAILOR’S DELIGHT:

“So, atmospheric conditions in a high-pressure area are typically cloud free and dirty, and those in a low-pressure area are cloudy and relatively clean (fewer aerosols).

Light from the sun is made up of the colors in the rainbow, which correspond to different wavelengths of radiation.  The blues are made up of short wavelengths and the reds of longer wavelengths. The radiative properties of a dirty atmosphere differ from those of a clean atmosphere. That is because light from the sun is scattered differently by air molecules than by aerosols (which are relatively larger). Air molecules scatter the shorter wavelengths more efficiently, and that is why the sky is blue!

Dust or aerosols scatter the longer wavelengths (red light) more efficiently, and most of that light is scattered in the forward direction (the direction in which the light is moving). Also, at sunrise and sunset the sun’s rays travel through a long path of atmosphere, so these scattering processes are very efficient at those times. Therefore, sunlight traveling through a long path of dirty atmosphere at sunrise or sunset is made up of primarily the reddish wavelengths when it reaches the observer (e.g., look at the color of smog in Los Angeles or Denver). A cleaner atmosphere at sunrise or sunset is colored by a mixture of all but the blue colors, giving it a yellowish appearance.”

Now you have the science behind the adage. Picture yourself on a ship in the middle of a mid-latitude ocean. There the wind (and thus storm paths) is from west to east. It is morning and you are watching the sunrise. It is red. Since it is morning you are looking east, and the red sky indicates that there is high pressure there. Because you are in the mid-latitudes, the high is moving eastward–away from you. That could only mean that a low, and very likely an associated storm, is moving toward you from the west.  Sailor take warning! Now picture yourself watching the sunset from the ship, and the western sky is red.  That means that an area of high pressure is to your west, the westerlies are moving it toward you, and good weather is on the way–sailor’s delight!

Note that this only works in the belt of westerlies, from about 30 degrees to 60 degrees latitude in both the northern and southern hemispheres. The region 30 degrees on either side of the equator is characterized by easterlies (the trade winds). This adage would be opposite in that region.”

photo_101_rehab_widget_small

Check out Lucile’s Clinic here.

Silver Threading signature