⭐️#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 280, #SpecificForm: Lanturne or Lanterne

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

It’s been a crazy week! Our bathroom renovations are coming along nicely. The contractor is working hard to get this job done. On top of all of this turmoil, my husband got the flu! He was totally incapacitated for about three days.

Then, on Sunday, I received a few posts from bloggers telling me that my previous blog theme was making comments difficult. So, I took care of that with this newer theme. It’s a work in progress so if something is off, I’ll get around to fixing it this week. I’m sorry for all the inconvenience.

If you haven’t read the post featuring the winners of the Word Craft Syllabic Poetry Contest, you can find that here: WINNERS

I want to thank our amazing poetry community for all we do for each other. I love writing syllabic poetry with you each week and look forward to many more challenges. 💜💚💛

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena11.Sylvia Cognac21.E.A. Colquitt
2.Jude12.sally cronin22.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr
3.ben Alexander13.anita dawes23.Selma
4.Annette Rochelle Aben14.Gwen Plano24.kittysverses
5.willowdot2115.Cheryl25.The Versesmith
6.Eugenia16.Balroop Singh26.Ruth Klein
7.Britta Benson17.Aishwarya Kannan27.Yvette M Calleiro
8.Sarah David18.Echoes of the soul28.Veera
9.Jules19.Echoes of the soul29.Colleen Chesebro
10.D. L. Finn20.Kerfe  

What a fabulous week of poetry! The Lanturne form turned out to be a hit! This week, I chose Yvette’s lanturne poem to highlight!

I
exist
beautiful
happy, calm, strong
me

be
sit still
now listen
follow your breath
sigh

see
clearly
all are one
accept what is
truth

live
zestful
with purpose
in the moment
thrive

© Yvette M Calleiro

I loved the positive message this series sends to us all. Visit Yvette’s blog to see the stunning photo of her trip to Arizona. The colors are amazing!

This week, I’ve asked Yvette to choose the specific form for next month’s challenge for us to learn more about. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 280, 7/12/22, #SpecificForm: Lanturne or Lanterne

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

Last month, I asked Lisa, the VerseSmith to select a syllabic form for us to learn more about. Her choice was the lanturne or lanterne. The lanturne is a kind of shape poetry. Many say it originated from Japan, but I found no evidence to support that claim.

The lanturne is a five-line verse shaped like a Japanese lantern with a syllabic pattern of one, two, three, four, one. (1, 2, 3, 4, 1).

This week, write a lanturne poem or a series of lanturne poems. (A series gets you extra credit, by the way). The only thing I ask is that you do not use “ing” ending words to satisfy the word count.

FAST FACTS

Wikipedia.org shares:

“A lanterne is a cinquain form of poetry, in which the first line has one syllable and each subsequent line increases in length by one syllable, except for the final line that concludes the poem with one syllable (1-2-3-4-1). Its name derives from the lantern shape that appears when the poem is aligned to the center of the page.

Each line of the lanterne is able to stand on its own, and while the poem may or may not be given a title, the title of a lanterne sometimes functions as an integral part of the poem, working as a ‘sixth’ line.”

Wikipedia.org

Antonia Sorin, from The Pen & the Pad, shares a detailed post on how to write a Lanterne poem:

The lantern is a short shape poem from Japan describing a specific one syllable noun, such as a feeling, a thing, or an abstract idea. The lantern poem takes the form of a hanging lantern, going from short to wider as the poem goes on, and then becoming short again in the final line. The purpose of the lantern poem is to illuminate the subject and re-imagine or personalize it for the reader, not just to simply define it.

Make the paragraph center-aligned, in a word processing program. If using pen and paper, write in the middle of the page.

Choose a one syllable noun. This will serve as both the topic of your poem and the first line. For example, “Bed.”

Describe the noun in two syllables for the second line. It can be be either one word or two words. In my example, it could be “gentle.”

Describe the noun in three syllables for the third line. The lantern shape should start becoming noticeable, with the poem getting slowly wider with each line. For the sample poem, I’ll use, “Soft pillows.”

Describe the noun in four syllables for the fourth line. This is the widest line in the poem. For this line in the sample poem, I’ll use, “Sleep, jump, play, love.”

Choose a one syllable noun that is a synonym or a reinterpretation of the original noun for the fifth and final line. If the original noun was “bed,” the final noun could be “rest,” and thus the poem redefines a bed as rest. Note our finished example poem would look like this (although it would be center-aligned) (I can’t center align selected text in the quote block):

Bed

Gentle

Soft pillows

Sleep, jump, play, love

Rest

The lantern shape can also be thought of as a bell shape.

Don’t be afraid to use a simile in the second, third or fourth lines. A simile is a comparison using “like” or “as.”

Sorin, Antonia. “How to Write a Lantern Poem” last modified July 11, 2022. https://penandthepad.com/write-lantern-poem-4928414.html

This is the example poem below. I see where the addition of a title would give this lanterne poem more punch. So keep that in mind when you craft your own poetry. Also, I prefer syllabic poetry to have each line “un-capitalized,” unlike freestyle poetry which capitalizes each line to separate thoughts. The syllable count per line defines the poem’s flow. The capitalization is unnecessary.

“Untitled”

bed 
gentle 
soft pillows 
sleep, jump, play, love 
rest

© Antonia Sorin

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry?

READ THIS FIRST: How to Craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

RhymeZone.com

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

  • Follow the directions above. Write your syllabic poem. Try not to use “ing” ending words to satisfy the word count.
  • Post it on your blog. Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL: https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink). You might have to delete your previous entry.
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

MR. LINKY BELOW

Follow the schedule listed below:

Now, have fun and write some lanturne poetry!

#TankaTuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge No. 279: #Tastetherainbow-Color/Weather Poetry

Hello everyone. Happy JULY! I’m thrilled to see everyone once again! I need a vacation from my vacation! The second-floor flooring has all been replaced. No more yucky old carpet. I’ve got a break for a week and then the contractor begins work on the two bathrooms. It’s a busy summer!

Now, let’s get back to writing poetry together!

This week, choose your own syllabic form and a color to feature in your syllabic poem. But, let’s add a little something else to make it special! This week, along with a color, add some weather to your poem. You can find some ideas HERE.

If the form is from the #TankaTuesday cheat sheet, let us know so we know where to look for directions. If it’s a new form, share how to write it and where you found the instructions. Think about the different ways you can use color in a poem.

💜 💜 💜

Color Meanings – The Power and Symbolism of Colors

Color Symbolism in Literature: What Do Colors Mean in Literature and Poetry?

Symbolism – Definition & Examples

💜 💜 💜

P.S. 🌈 Taste the Rainbow refers to colors. You do not have to write about a rainbow in your poem. Just include a color in your poem. 🌈


Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry—The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

*Write your poem and post it on your blog.

*USE sodacoffee.com/syllables to count your syllables. That way, we are all using the same syllable counter.

*Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).

*Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

*Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

*Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

*Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

Follow the schedule listed below:

Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 July Specific Form: Lisa

💚 July Photo Prompt: Willow

💛 July Theme Prompt: Harmony

Now, have fun and write some color/weather themed poetry!

#TankaTuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge No. 277: #Tastetherainbow-Color Poetry

Hello everyone. Happy June and Pride Month! This week, choose a syllabic form and a color to feature in your poem. If the form is from the #TankaTuesday cheat sheet, let us know so we know where to look for directions. If it’s a new form, share how to write it and where you found the instructions. Think about the different ways you can use color in a poem.

💜 💜 💜

Color Meanings – The Power and Symbolism of Colors

Color Symbolism in Literature: What Do Colors Mean in Literature and Poetry?

Symbolism – Definition & Examples

💜 💜 💜

P.S. 🌈 Taste the Rainbow refers to colors. You do not have to write about a rainbow in your poem. Just include a color in your poem. 🌈


Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry—The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

*Write your poem and post it on your blog.

*USE sodacoffee.com/syllables to count your syllables. That way, we are all using the same syllable counter.

*Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).

*Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

*Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

*Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

*Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

Follow the schedule listed below:

Now, have fun and write some color themed poetry!

#TANKATUESDAY Weekly #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 275, 5/24/22, #THEMEPROMPT

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

Here we are for another #TankaTuesday poetry challenge! Are you ready for a theme prompt? Kerfe selected this month’s theme:

This month’s theme is:

“Useful”

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Start Crafting Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

  • Write a poem based on the above theme using a syllabic form of your choice found on the cheat sheet OR from the Poetscollective.org using the theme above.
  • *USE sodacoffee.com/syllables to count your syllables. That way, we are all using the same syllable counter. 
  • Post it on your blog. Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy the https:// address link of your published post into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the 2022 schedule listed below:

Join me and learn how to write syllabic poetry! Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available in print and ebook versions on Amazon.com.

Now, have fun and write some syllabic poetry!


#TankaTuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge No. 272: #Tastetherainbow-Color Poetry

Hello everyone. Happy May! This week, choose your own syllabic form and a color to feature in your syllabic poem. If the form is from the #TankaTuesday cheat sheet, let us know so we know where to look for directions. If it’s a new form, share how to write it and where you found the instructions. Think about the different ways you can use color in a poem.

💜 💜 💜

Color Meanings – The Power and Symbolism of Colors

Color Symbolism in Literature: What Do Colors Mean in Literature and Poetry?

Symbolism – Definition & Examples

💜 💜 💜

P.S. 🌈 Taste the Rainbow refers to colors. You do not have to write about a rainbow in your poem. Just include a color in your poem. 🌈


Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry—The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

*Write your poem and post it on your blog.

*USE sodacoffee.com/syllables to count your syllables. That way, we are all using the same syllable counter.

*Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).

*Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

*Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

*Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

*Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

Follow the schedule listed below:

Now, have fun and write some color themed poetry!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 271 | #ThemePrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was from Yvette M. Caldeiro, and we were to write our choice of syllabic poem, using the theme of beginnings & endings. We could use a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Have you had a difficult time commenting on my blog? Please let me know in the comments, so I can let WP know. Thank you. 💜

I wanted to let you know that I created this post using the WordPress App. I didn’t have any issues for the first time in a long time, which I think is a real plus. We’ve all used WP for so many years as web-based… but maybe the app is more stable? It sure worked better for me.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena8.Pat15.Annette Rochelle Aben
2.willowdot219.Goutam Dutta16.M J Mallon
3.Harmony Kent10.Eugenia17.kittysverses
4.Jules11.Donna Matthews18.Yvette M Calleiro (correct link)
5.Sarah David12.Sally Cronin19.Kerfe
6.D. L. Finn13.Colleen Chesebro20.Michael Todd (see below)
7.Gwen Plano14.Ruth Klein21.David: Skeptic’s Kaddish

What a great selection of “beginnings and endings” this week. Here are a few highlights:

Donna Matthews haiku: In this haiku, “yellow petals” is the kigo. It could be spring, summer, or fall with yellow petals blooming. She doesn’t tell us what to think, instead she simply shares her observations for us to draw our own conclusions. Read more about Haiku & Zappai:

Haiku & Zappai

We also have a poet who has been posting in the comments since he doesn’t have a blog. How cool is that? He calls in his poetry to the Speakeasy Cafe! Thank you Michael for the wonderful mention of Word Craft Poetry! 💜

Michael said: “I read this tonight, at our internet radio site. I was on from 34:40 to 48:54 …
I directed our audience to you, in care of Word Craft Poetry…”

https://www.blogtalkradio.com/speakeasycafe/2022/04/29/speakeasy-cafe-online-open-mic-poetry-radio-show-national-poetry-month-special

Alley Allies (for Word Craft Poetry ~ Tanka Tuesday)

Strive for strike or spare,
trying my best. They keep score.
Colleen casts a glare,
I suggest barroom singing;
karaoke down the hall.

We’re Sonny and Cher,
waking up to Groundhog Day.
get to the part where,
she is miming me with clues.
I’m still wearing bowling shoes.

Michael Todd (2022)

I think it was the week for chōka poetry, because Sally Cronin’s chōka really captured the spirit of beginnings and endings. It was so creative!

This week, I selected Kerfe’s shadorma chain called May 22, to feature. Make sure you stop by her blog, because the art Kerfe created is a lovely addition to her words.

"May 22"

we mark time
with numbers, naming
circles, lines–
converged
and then divided—each month
we begin again,

ending the
previous parcel
of days in
our minds—when
in fact they overlap—clouds,
sun, showers, flowers

© Kerfe Roig

This week, I’ve asked Kerfe to choose the prompt for next month’s theme challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks. 💜

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 270 -Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

I’ve been doing a lot of spring cleaning at my house and on the blog. I’ll continue to update the challenge cheat sheet so you can find everything in one place. The main page of wordcraftpoetry.com also contains helpful links, and other widgets. If you’re looking for something, this might be the place to start. Don’t forget the navigation widgets on the right-hand side of the blog. I have them spit between word craft poetry, Colleen Chesebro, and Word Weaving poetry journal.

The good thing about cleaning is how the action of cleaning forces you to work in the moment. As I concentrated on the different tasks, I realized how good it felt to step away from the computer for a bit. I’m working on another book, and with all of my other projects, it’s easy to get worn out. This winter was especially cold and long, so I did something for myself. I created a yoga room! This will give me a place to exercise a few times a week. Now that the weather is warmer, I’ll have gardening chores to attend to. I bet you will too!

Everyone remember, this challenge is a time when you can step away from the challenges of life and immerse yourself in the written word. If it doesn’t work for you, don’t stress. Stop by to write poetry when you can. ❤️

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena7.Jules13.Yvette M Calleiro
2.ben Alexander8.Gwen Plano14.Ruth Klein
3.Harmony Kent9.Sarah David15.M J Mallon
4.willowdot2110.Balroop Singh16.D. Wallace Peach
5.Annette Rochelle Aben11.Sally Cronin  
6.D. L. Finn12.theindieshe  

D. L. Finn shared such a lovely image of dolphins. I was so impressed with everyone’s poetry this week. Thanks for joining in!

There were a couple of reasons why I chose David’s garland cinquain. I was mesmerized by how each verse flowed into the next, sharing the life of these gentle creatures. The flow of the stanzas mimicked the rhythm of the sea. The final cinquain, summed up the poem in a spectacular way. This is a delightful poem!

A Garland Cinquain

An ekphrastic poem

loving
tactile closeness
complex social networks
mothers and calves; pair-bonded males
tight ties

echoes
a world of words
piercing high frequencies
sound waves cut through murky waters
pictures

vocal
sweet exchanges
love, pathos, joy, warnings
collaborative, synchronized
fishing

coupling
sex for pleasure
mates belly–to–belly 
nuzzle, click, rub, pectoral pat
fondness

decades
long memories
enduring relationships
shared emotions; dreams, ideas
one pod

loving
a world of words
love, pathos, joy, warnings
nuzzle, click, rub, pectoral pat
one pod

© David Bogomolny

This week, I’ve asked David to choose the Ekphrastic photo prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your image to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 263 | #TastetheRainbow: GREEN

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to choose your own syllabic form and a shade of green to feature in your syllabic poem. You’ll receive bonus points if you don’t use the name: green. You’ll also receive bonus points if you can also incorporate a different meaning for the word green in your poem. We can use a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

***Now, some of you may wonder why I gave you such specific instructions this week. I often find these kinds of instructions in poetry contests and submissions for journals and other poetic events. If you followed the directions, bravo to you for paying attention! This was a fun way to practice and hone your poetry writing skills!

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena12.Laura McHarrie23.Ruth Klein
2.ladyleemanila13.Selma24.Donna Matthews
3.ben Alexander14.Jude25.Eugenia
4.Trent McDonald15.Harmony Kent26.Sally Cronin
5.Annette Rochelle Aben16.Sri27.wildchild47
6.Annette Rochelle Aben17.s. s.28.Jane Aguiar
7.Selma18.Cheryl29.Pat
8.willowdot2119.The Versesmith30.Elizabeth
9.Gwen Plano20.Kerfe31.Anisha
10.Jules21.D. Avery32.You’re next!
11.D. L. Finn22.Yvette M Calleiro  

There were so many synonyms for the color green! Did you know there were that many ways to describe the color? Using this kind of imagery helps us see your poem through your eyes. Bravo to all of you who chose words to “imply” the color green, as well. 💚

Check out the synonyms for GREEN!

smaragdine: Anisha

rural: Pat

beryl: Jane

seaweed, chartreuse: CantalopeSky

olive, jade: Sally

peridot: D. Avery

pine, sage, juniper: Jude

sap: Selma

greenback, La Fee Verte: Jules

viridesence: Willow

viridescent: Annette

grass, turquoise: David

rosemary: Lady Lee

I’ve tagged this post with “synonyms for the word green” so you can find it again! Thanks for playing along. 💚 ☘️ 💚

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge No. 263, 3/1/22: #Tastetherainbow-Color Poetry

Hello everyone. This week, let’s have fun with the color of March: GREEN!

Green is one of those colors that includes many shades of green. This color also has different meanings not associated with the color.

This week’s challenge is to choose your own syllabic form and a shade of green to feature in your syllabic poem. You’ll receive bonus points if you don’t use the name: green. You’ll also receive bonus points if you can also incorporate a different meaning for the word green in your poem.

If the form is from the #TankaTuesday Cheat sheet, let us know so we know where to look for directions. If it’s a new form, share how to write it and where you found the instructions. Please let us know the name of the form. With so many syllabic forms, it’s hard to know which one you’re using. <3

Here is my example: A senryu:

emerald crystals—
assist immature witches
believe in magic

© Colleen M. Chesebro

I used the word “emerald” for green and the word “immature” which also means green, or inexperienced!

P.S. 🌈 Taste the Rainbow refers to colors. You do not have to write about a rainbow in your poem. Include a color. 🌈


Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

sodacoffee.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry—The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry

THE RULES

*Write your poem and post it on your blog. Extra points if you don’t use the word: green, and if you use another shade of green. Even more extra points if you also use another meaning for green in your poem.

*USE sodacoffee.com/syllables to count your syllables. That way, we are all using the same syllable counter.

*Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).

*Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

*Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

*Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

*Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

Mr. Linky BELOW

Follow the schedule listed below:

I’m having fun playing Wordle!

Now, have fun and write some SYLLABIC poetry!