#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 283 | #TastetheRainbow, Chakra Color Poetry

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a chakra color. We could use a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Sylvia Cognac7.Gwen Plano13.Colleen Chesebro
2.ben Alexander8.Cheryl14.Pat
3.Balroop Singh9.anitadawesauthor@ btinternet. com15.Annette Rochelle Aben
4.Harmony Kent10.Jules16.Reena
5.Eugenia11.Vashti Quiroz- Vega17. You’re next!
6.Laura McHarrie12.Ruth Klein  

Great job this week, poets! 🥳

I don’t know about anyone else, but I enjoyed the challenge of choosing a chakra color to write about. When you use color in your poetry, it helps others connect emotionally to your poem.

When we employ the psychology of color, our symbolism deepens in meaning. For example, I used the color blue, which can also allude to one being sad or morose. However, when we employ the chakra color theory to our symbolism, we learn the color blue is associated with “heaven, or pure mind.”

Jules chose the green (heart chakra). She used the color in specific ways. Kaeru (the frog) is green, and she wrote about love in her haibun. Notice how the symbolism in her poem deepened the meaning. Those connections to the heart chakra came through loud and clear. Usually, the color green implies jealousy, but not when we use chakra color theory.

Don’t be afraid to experiment with color theory in your poetry and other writings: https://www.verywellmind.com/color-psychology-2795824

August Specific Form: Yvette

August Photo Prompt: Reena

August Theme Prompt: Sarah

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 282, #ThemePrompt: “The Longest Day”

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Harmony Kent7.ben Alexander13.theindieshe
2.Reena Saxena8.I deleted Margaret’s extra link14.Margaret 21
3.willowdot219.D. L. Finn15.Mayuri Srivastava
4.Gwen Plano10.Annette Rochelle Aben16.Ruth Klein
5.Cheryl11.Jules17.Jane Aguiar
6.Sarah David12.Colleen Chesebro18.You’re next!

Whew! What a week! I’ve been working on some creative projects this week, so I’ve been extra busy. Our contractor should finish the last bathroom on Tuesday! I can’t wait for this chapter of home renovations to be over.

👉🏻 🥳 👉🏻 I came across this blog post by Ken Hume HERE about writing poetry with your whole life. This is a great read! Please stop by Ken’s blog and share your thoughts. 👏🏻

Harmony picked a tough theme this week. What did your longest day look like? This week, I went with Sarah David’s shadorma poem, “Solstice.” The summer solstice was my first thought on the theme of the longest day. I liked the flow of this poem. Sarah captures the essence of the summer solstice in so few words.

Solstice

summer’s breath
blistering sunrise
glowing still
long past day
simmering into sunset
lengthening shadows

© Sarah David

This week, I’ve asked Sarah David to choose the theme prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Upcoming Prompt Poets

Specific Form: Yvette

Photo: Reena

Theme: Sarah

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 281 | #PhotoPrompt, #Ekphrastic

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena7.Jules13.Ruth Klein
2.willowdot218.theindieshe14.D.G. Kaye
3.ben Alexander9.Yvette M Calleiro15.kittysverses
4.Gwen Plano10.Goutam Dutta16.Margaret 21
5.Balroop Singh11.Selma17.Mayuri Srivastava
6.The Versesmith12.Annette Rochelle Aben18.You’re next!

We’re almost at the end of our bathroom renovation. One more week… because of a cracked counter top which had to be replaced. By next weekend, we should be finished, fini, terminado, done!! I miss writing poetry! I am renovation’d out! It’s been a long year and a half of waiting for contractors, waiting for supplies, and waiting for it all to be over. If you’ve never done renovations, let me tell you, it’s messy, dirty, and hugely disruptive. We’re almost at the finish line!

Many thanks to all of you for writing syllabic poetry this week. I apologize for the time it took me to read and comment on your poems. On top of the renovations, we found another leak under the sink, and my Wi-Fi/computer had hiccups again! The plumber gets another call tomorrow, and I think I solved the issues with my Wi-Fi. Trouble shooting is a wonderful thing.

I want to thank Willow for providing the photo of the statue from St. Pancras station. Margaret, from FROM PYRENEES TO PENNINES shares more information about the statue and the station, which I found really interesting.

This statue inspired a wide range of poetry. I loved how everyone interpreted this piece of art differently. That’s important to your poetry and sharing what you see or feel is the whole idea behind Ekphrastic poetry.

Reena’s Blason poem really spoke to me. The form is interesting—a new form for me. Also, I detected some negative energy from the statue, as did a few other poets. (This was before I read Margaret’s informative post about the statue).

Reena’s poem is an excellent example of selecting the perfect form to portray the “spirit” of the statue.

Poetscollective.org states:

Blason is a genre of poetry committed to the praise or blame of something through the use of a series of images that support the theme. It is a variation of the ancient Catalogue Poem. From French heraldry, blason translates as “the codified description of a coat of arms” Originally French poet, Clement Marot, wrote a poem praising a woman by listing parts of her body with metaphors to compare with them. Parts of the female body became a recurring topic of the Blason and continues to be the focus, although other subjects could be adapted.

Although the concept of the Blason can be applied to any verse form such as the sonnet or Blank Verse, the Blason often takes the form of octosyllabic or decasyllabic verse that ends with an epigraphic conclusion.

The Blason is often
• framed at the discretion of the poet, although lines are often syllabic, 8 or 10 syllables long.
• composed with a list of different images of the same thing with accompanying metaphors.
• written with a sharp conclusion.”

Blason: poetscollective.org

“Threat”

She raises her foot to meet his sharp gaze
yet her trust fails to see the looming threat

She fails to see the support underground
people wish well, but fear the bayonet

His manner spells danger, he’ll get his way
pretends to kiss, wants to intimidate

she has time to loosen his deathly grip
jump out, be rescued rather than regret

© Reena Saxena

This week, I’ve asked Reena Saxena to choose the photo prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your image (with credits) to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 August Specific Form: Yvette

💚 August Photo Prompt: Reena

💛 July Theme Prompt: Harmony

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

⭐️#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 280, #SpecificForm: Lanturne or Lanterne

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org.

It’s been a crazy week! Our bathroom renovations are coming along nicely. The contractor is working hard to get this job done. On top of all of this turmoil, my husband got the flu! He was totally incapacitated for about three days.

Then, on Sunday, I received a few posts from bloggers telling me that my previous blog theme was making comments difficult. So, I took care of that with this newer theme. It’s a work in progress so if something is off, I’ll get around to fixing it this week. I’m sorry for all the inconvenience.

If you haven’t read the post featuring the winners of the Word Craft Syllabic Poetry Contest, you can find that here: WINNERS

I want to thank our amazing poetry community for all we do for each other. I love writing syllabic poetry with you each week and look forward to many more challenges. 💜💚💛

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena11.Sylvia Cognac21.E.A. Colquitt
2.Jude12.sally cronin22.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr
3.ben Alexander13.anita dawes23.Selma
4.Annette Rochelle Aben14.Gwen Plano24.kittysverses
5.willowdot2115.Cheryl25.The Versesmith
6.Eugenia16.Balroop Singh26.Ruth Klein
7.Britta Benson17.Aishwarya Kannan27.Yvette M Calleiro
8.Sarah David18.Echoes of the soul28.Veera
9.Jules19.Echoes of the soul29.Colleen Chesebro
10.D. L. Finn20.Kerfe  

What a fabulous week of poetry! The Lanturne form turned out to be a hit! This week, I chose Yvette’s lanturne poem to highlight!

I
exist
beautiful
happy, calm, strong
me

be
sit still
now listen
follow your breath
sigh

see
clearly
all are one
accept what is
truth

live
zestful
with purpose
in the moment
thrive

© Yvette M Calleiro

I loved the positive message this series sends to us all. Visit Yvette’s blog to see the stunning photo of her trip to Arizona. The colors are amazing!

This week, I’ve asked Yvette to choose the specific form for next month’s challenge for us to learn more about. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 279 | #Color/Weather Syllabic Poetry

What a wild couple of weeks it’s been. The new floors are in! Both of the upstairs bathrooms will be gutted and replaced, starting today. So, if I appear distracted, I probably am! I can shut my door while the worst of the tear out takes place, so that will help. I will post the Word Craft Syllabic Poetry Contest results on July 13, 2022. This is a busy and exciting week!

This is the media room
This is the loft/yoga room (still a work in progress)

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org. I asked everyone to use a color and a bit of weather to make our poetry interesting.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena10.Donna Matthews19.Echoes of the soul
2.anita dawes11.Harmony Kent20.Goutam Dutta
3.ladyleemanila12.ben Alexander21.Kerfe
4.kittysverses13.Balroop Singh22.Selma
5.The Versesmith14.Ruth Klein23.Sri
6.Britta Benson15.Jane Aguiar24.sally cronin
7.Cheryl16.D. L. Finn25.Colleen Chesebro
8.willowdot2117.Jules26.Paula Light
9.Annette Rochelle Aben18.Yvette M Calleiro 

I think everyone missed writing syllabic poetry! I know color poetry is a favorite and with the addition of weather in our poetry; the imagery was extra special. It was fun to see photos of where you live, as well. We’re all from around the globe. It’s like going on a picturesque, poetic journey with you all.

Here are a few that caught my attention:

Reena shares a poem about a monsoon.

Britta shares How to measure space-time on summer holidays.

Sally shares a crown cinquain called Drought.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

⭐️#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 278 | #SpecificForm: tanka prose

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write tanka prose. There is a ton of information in this post. Please READ through to the end.

We’re coming up on the six-year anniversary of #TankaTuesday in August, and I’m sure by now everyone knows how to craft their own tanka prose. REMEMBER… tanka prose is always at the least, one prose paragraph, and one tanka poem. Not just a tanka poem…. follow the rules of the challenge. 💜 💚 💛

We typically write tanka in the 5-7-5-7-7 or s/l/s/l/l five-line syllabic structure. Tanka prose always contains a title. One basic requirement: one paragraph, and one tanka. There are two basic forms in classic tanka prose: Preface (explanation), and the Poem Tale (episodic narration). No rhyming.

More on tanka prose HERE by Charles Tarlton, Toward a Theory and Practice of Tanka-Prose

READ the in-depth post below on how to write tanka prose

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Word Craft Poetry Syllabic Poetry Contest

Don’t forget, there will not be a #TankaTuesday post on Tuesday, June 21st. Instead, Word Craft Poetry will sponsor a syllabic poetry contest with prizes. Make sure you visit wordcraftpoetry.com on Tuesday to learn about the contest. It will run from Tuesday, 6/21/22 – Sunday, 6/26/22.

The contest is open to our writing and poetic community. Pay attention to the rules. If you don’t follow the directions, I will disqualify your submission.

MORE NEWS…

I will be on vacation from June 27 through July 4, 2022. I’ll return with a new #TankaTuesday post on July 5, 2022.

Also new on the blog is a widget (at the right) that lists the names of the poets who I’ve asked to select the prompts for the different challenges for the current month. I will include this information in the challenge post and in the recap each week. Since we won’t have a photo prompt or theme prompt in June, I’ve moved the poets to the July posts.

Email with Gmail seems to be an issue for many of us. My email for word craft poetry is tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. You can also contact me HERE. BELOW, you can sign up for my daily blog post email so you never lose track of a challenge again.


Upcoming #TankaTuesday Prompt Poets

💜 July Specific Form: Lisa, the VerseSmith

💚 July Photo Prompt: Willow

💛 July Theme Prompt: Harmony


Finally, on to the challenge! Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Harmony kent8.Elizabeth15.sally cronin
2.Reena Saxena9.Cheryl16.The Versesmith
3.ben Alexander10.Jules17.theindieshe
4.Gwen Plano11.Kerfe18.kittysverses
5.willowdot2112.Ruth Klein19.Jude
6.Balroop Singh13.anita dawes20.Jane Aguiar
7.Lauren Swanberg14.Goutam Dutta  

This week, I chose Lisa’s tanka prose to feature. Written in the first person, Lisa’s poem takes the reader on a journey into her garden. I enjoyed the experience! How about you?

This is an excellent example of The Preface (explanation): This is where the prose paragraph is narrow, concerned with only providing the reader a factual summary of the basic information including the time and place, the name of a person, or a public occasion as the reason for writing on the set topic. A tanka follows the prose. Or you can write your tanka as the preface, and your prose reflects on the tanka.

“Such a Strange June”

I’m working in the garden, weeding, pruning, the ordinary tasks for summer’s approach. Heat on my head, as I’ve forgotten the hat I’d promised to wear. It’s sitting on the dowry chest in my bedroom where I can’t miss it, yet so often do. Skies suddenly darken. Sprinkles begin to dot the deck with splotches, reminding me of the markings on a dog I once had. Soon the clouds fully open and release a deluge. I race for the house, calling my now-dog to follow. Yarrow flattens. Poppies bow their heads. Gutters overflow. Tomorrow, with the sun dazzling through the cleansed air, the garden will glister. 

late spring flowers bloom
heedless to the warming days  
a sudden shower
cool sips for the thirsty soul
serenity in nature

© Lisa, The VerseSmith

When you split the tanka by reading the first three lines together, you clearly understand the pivot (a sudden shower). Notice how the pivot gives us what the Japanese call the mono no aware moment? Mono no aware recognizes the transient nature of all things. A sudden shower is temporary…

Now, read the tanka poem starting with line three (the pivot) and include lines four and five. Here, you connect with another layer of meaning.

Clearly, the tanka reflects back to the prose. Remember, make your prose memorable. Share the beauty of the moment.


This week, I’ve asked Lisa, the VerseSmith, to choose the prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 276 | #ShareYourDay

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org. The idea was to share some aspect of your day (or week). This is a way to get to know each other better. I enjoy this challenge so much. It’s great to get a more personal glimpse into your lives. 💜

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below. Let’s give a warm welcome to our newest poets: Britta Benson, Tzvi Fievel, and Smitha Vishwanath.

1.Reena Saxena8.Donna Matthews15.theindieshe
2.Britta Benson9.ben Alexander16.Ritu Bhathal
3.Harmony Kent10.willowdot2117.Ruth Klein
4.Veera11.D. L. Finn18.Yvette M Calleiro
5.Laura McHarrie12.Elizabeth19.Colleen Chesebro
6.Tzvi Fievel13.Cheryl20.Smitha Vishwanath
7.Gwen Plano14.Jules21.You’re next!

I love this challenge! You all did a fabulous job this week! Thanks for joining in.

I’ve set the date for the Word Weaving Syllabic Poetry Contest! The contest will kick off on June 21, 2022, the Summer Solstice. On that date, I’ll post the rules, the prize amounts, and the length of the contest. MARK YOUR CALENDARS.

Please be aware that I won’t post a #TankaTuesday challenge that week. I’m sure you would rather submit your poetry for a chance to win some prize money. 💜


See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 275 | #ThemePrompt: “Useful”

Happy Memorial Day (May 30th)! What is Memorial Day?

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org, using the theme of “useful.”

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Harmony Kent8.willowdot2115.Colleen Chesebro
2.ben Alexander9.Tzvi Fievel16.theindieshe
3.D. L. Finn10.Annette Rochelle Aben17.Veera
4.Jules11.Yvette M Calleiro18.Ruth Klein
5.Gwen Plano12.Kerfe19.sally Cronin
6.Sarah David13.Reena Saxena20.You’re next!
7.Selma14.Balroop Singh  

Whew! Kerfe’s selection of “useful” for the theme this week sure produced some great poetry. I found the theme a significant challenge, which is exactly what we want. There were so many ways to look at “useful.”

This week, I chose Harmony Kent’s Alouette to feature. Not only does the message resonate with the theme of useful, but the advice is spot-on (useful) for many of us in a busy world. Check out Harmony’s blog for the rules on how to write an Alouette. <3

"Empty Vessel"

of what use is an
empty pot?—more than
the space within the vessel?
best vacant or full?
life brings push and pull—
with such things we must wrestle
 

esse is more than
achievements that span
the years in which days nestle
cup spills if too full
the mess left—awful
too busy is not special


better to sit an’
reflect—be still—than
coat yourself in the speckle
of the useless pall
of doing it all
twisted up like a pretzel

 
the pragmatic man
walked before he ran
balanced work with the restful
drop by drop—stream full
listen first then call
for a life quintessential

©Harmony Kent

This week, I’ve asked Harmony Kent to choose the prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to colleen@wordcraftpoetry.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 274 | #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org. David, from the Skeptic’s Kaddish, provided the photo below.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena9.Cheryl17.Colleen Chesebro
2.ben Alexander10.Jules18.Ruth Klein
3.Harmony Kent11.Veera19.s. s.
4.willowdot2112.Kerfe20.Sally Cronin
5.Gwen Plano13.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr21.Annette Rochelle Aben
6.Lauren Swanberg14.Yvette M Calleiro22.Jude

When David sent me this photo, I immediately saw the potential in the image. It was a photo of his father taking photos. The best part—we couldn’t see what he was seeing. That left so much room for speculation on our parts. In my humble opinion, this is the perfect inspiration for crafting great poetry! At the same time, the photo was deeply personal to our friend, as his father had passed.

© David, The Skeptic’s Kaddish

The exploration of “what was beyond the photo lens” resulted in some of the best poetry I’ve read in a long time. Could this be a lesson for us in finding inspiration? The next time you find yourself stuck because you don’t know what to write about, imagine yourself behind the lens of a camera… what do you see?

I found Reena’s gogyohka, written in breathy phrases, to be a powerful read!

This tanka by Tzvi Fievel shares some amazing imagery!

Willow’s nonet, The Lens of the Soul, written both forward and backward is an excellent example of the nonet form. When you read the poem the first way, you get one meaning, but the more powerful meaning comes from reading the poem in the reverse.

through the lens of the omnipotent
to soar high beyond the body
to attain the higher plain
past the confines of life
further than the eye
the horizon
life beyond
captured
truth

********

truth
captured
life beyond
the horizon
further than the eye
past the confines of life
to attain the higher plain
to soar high beyond the body
through the lens of the omnipotent

© Willow Willers

This week, I’ve asked Willow to choose the #PhotoPrompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your photo (with credits) to me at least a week before the challenge to colleen@wordcraftpoetry.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 273 #SpecificForm: butterfly cinquain

What a busy week it’s been! I’ve spent most of the week digging garden beds, planting plants, trees, and bushes. Afterward I had to cover everything up with mulch. After the long winter inside, it felt wonderful to be outside. I’ve lugged so many bags of mulch… I wore myself out! Hopefully, the week ahead will see me writing poetry again!

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week, Sally Cronin selected the form for us to work with. She chose the butterfly cinquain. The Butterfly Cinquain is an unrhymed, nine-line syllabic poem with 2-4-6-8-2-8-6-4-2 syllables per line.

You all outdid yourselves this week!! Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena9.Sarah David17.anita dawes
2.ben Alexander10.The Versesmith18.Elizabeth
3.Harmony Kent11.Mayuri Srivastava19.Sally Cronin
4.Cheryl12.Yvette M Calleiro20.Annette Rochelle Aben
5.Gwen Plano13.Donna Matthews21.theindieshe
6.willowdot2114.Jules22.You’re next!
7.Laura McHarrie15.Ruth Klein  
8.Tzvi Fievel16.Kerfe  

Writing syllabic poetry has its challenges. One challenge that is often overlooked is the message. Do you ask yourself why am I writing this poem? What message do I want to send to my readers? Am I only writing pretty words (purple prose) on this page? What is the point of this poem?

I want to draw attention to Sally Cronin’s poem HERE, because the message is crystal clear. Of course, not everything has to be stated in order for you to get the gist of the poem. As you can see, Sally’s words flow effortlessly.

This week, I selected Gwen’s butterfly cinquain to feature. Her poem carries a powerful message as well. Notice how effortlessly she conveys her message?

Maybe

© Gwen Plano

This week, I’ve asked Gwen Plano to choose the specific form for us to learn more about on next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to wordcraftpoetry@mail.com. Thanks.

Think you can’t write poetry? Join me, and learn some tips and tricks in writing syllabic poetry. Find the book on Amazon: mybook.to/WordCraftProsePoetry.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!