Meet the Poet: Elizabeth Gauffreau

Welcome to Meet the Poet, a Word Craft Poetry feature written to introduce you to the poets in our writing community. This is a way to get to know more about the poet and their work. Did you know many of our poets are accomplished fiction and non-fiction authors? Some of our poets are also artists, crafting their magic through watercolors or other artistic means along with the written word. There are even a few musicians in our poetic community!

At least once a month, I’ll be introducing you to the poets in our community! Grab a cup of tea or coffee, and meet the poet!

At the Free Thinker’s – Open Mic

Our guest this month is Elizabeth Gauffreau.

Elizabeth Gauffreau writes fiction and poetry with a strong connection to family and place. She holds a B.A. in English from Old Dominion University and an M.A. in English/Fiction Writing from the University of New Hampshire. She is currently the Assistant Dean of Curriculum & Assessment for Champlain College Online, where she is an Associate Professor. Her fiction and poetry have been published in literary magazines and several themed anthologies. Her debut novel, Telling Sonny, was published by Adelaide Books in 2018. Liz lives in Nottingham, New Hampshire with her husband.

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Hi, Colleen. Thanks so much for this interview. I’m really looking forward to our chat.

I’m glad you popped in, Liz. I’ve got to ask you… How important is accessibility of your poem’s meaning? Should one have to work hard to “solve” the poem?

Thank you for asking this question, Colleen. I feel strongly (to the point of preaching and ranting) that a poem is not a cryptogram to be solved like a crossword puzzle—and should not be treated as one. Too often, K-12 education has sent students out on a symbol safari, and if they came back with a zebra instead of a lion, they got a bad grade. I also think that this approach in fact devalues poetry. For me, poetry is reserved for the human experience that simply cannot be expressed through any other genre.

Liz, I think that’s a solid way of looking at the art of writing poetry.

Yes. I like to think of each poem I write, as well as each poem I read, as an experience on three levels. The visceral experience comes first through the poem’s sensory imagery, combined with the sounds of the words and the cadence of the lines.

The visceral experience gives rise to an emotional experience, how each element of the poem and the poem taken as a whole make me feel.

The intellectual experience of the poem comes last through a metacognitive process of reflection on my own experience of the poem to gain insight into why I reacted to it the way that I did.

I also think about contextual considerations that might be relevant, such as social, historical, or biographical events and perspectives. All three experiences then give me a rich and meaningful experience of a particular poem. This is how I hope readers experience my poetry. (A tall order, I know!)

When you talk about accessibility in the context of writing poetry, what do you mean?

That said, the question of a poem’s accessibility is an important one for poets to keep in mind. For me, a poem is inaccessible when the experience the poet intended for the reader to have is not, in fact, the experience the reader had.

I’ll give you a quick example. Yesterday, I read the following erasure poem about the crisis in Ukraine: “Mir in Ukraine.” 

My initial experience of the poem was confusion and frustration because of how the words are arranged on the screen and my own difficulty with spatial thinking. Based on her contributor’s note, the poet’s intent was not for readers to come away from the poem with an experience of confusion and frustration. The poem was inaccessible to me, in other words. However, the spoken word version of the poem opened the the accessibility door, and I was able to experience the poem as the poet intended.

Liz, why do you write syllabic poetry? 

I’ll confess to being dismissive of syllabic poetry for most of my writing life, based on the mistaken belief that formal poetry, syllabic poetry in particular, would be restrictive and limiting. (This without having tried to write it or read it in any kind of depth.)

This bias (along with some other closely-held writing biases) was challenged when I began blogging a few years ago in an effort to “build an author platform.” I started following your blog and learning what syllabic poetry actually is and how it works. The more I learned about it, the more I wanted to try it for myself. The fact that you were urging me on had something to do with it as well!

Liz at Cape Elizabeth

What gave me the push to try my hand at syllabic poetry was a trip to Portland Head Light on a cold and cloudy autumn day. I realized I had never seen Cape Elizabeth with a gray color palette. All my fond childhood memories of the place were bright sun and blue water. 

Might a haiku express what I was feeling as a result of this realization? I tried it, but haiku didn’t fit. Then I tried tanka, which proved to be the perfect marriage of form and content.

Like you, I try a couple of different forms before settling on a specific form to write. I’m glad to hear that writing tanka works for you. Liz, do you use other mediums, such as photography or artwork in your poetry? What message do you want your readers to receive from this kind of collaborative effort?

Not using images to accompany poetry was another of my closely-held writing biases prior to getting involved with blogging. I thought that using images with poetry was a form of cheating, that if the words alone couldn’t paint the picture, the poem wasn’t good enough. What changed my thinking was coming to understand that blogging is in part a visual medium, with images having a specific role to play in the post, depending on the content. 

During this same time period, I also became interested in ekphrastic poetry when I wrote one for the first time based on a prompt painting. The Ekphrastic Review accepted my poem for publication.

My understanding of ekphrastic poetry is that the artwork inspires the poem, but the poem must be able to stand on its own. It was a short step from there to start exploring how an image and a poem could be completely interdependent, that you take away one and the other loses its ultimate meaning. I explored this relationship in my debut poetry collection, Grief Songs: Poems of Love & Remembrance.

Thanks so much for stopping by Liz. I look forward to reading your newest release, “Grief Songs.”

Media Connections For Liz Gauffreau

Website: https://lizgauffreau.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LGauffreau

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/egauffreau

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/liz-gauffreau/

Goodreads:
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/18740495.Elizabeth_Gauffreau

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/egauffreau/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ElizabethGauffreau

Thanks for stopping by to meet Liz. See you next month, for another opportunity to Meet the Poet!

Meet the Poet: Jude Itakali

Welcome to Meet the Poet, a Word Craft Poetry feature written to introduce you to the poets in our writing community. This is a way to get to know more about the poet and their work. Did you know many of our poets are accomplished fiction and non-fiction authors? Some of our poets are also artists, crafting their magic through watercolors or other artistic means along with the written word.

At least once a month, I’ll be introducing you to the poets in our community! Grab a cup of tea or coffee, and meet the poet!


Please meet Jude Itakali.

Jude Itakali was born and lives in Kampala, Uganda. He has published his first poetry book “CROSSROADS (Winds of love)” and is on the cusp of publishing his debut novel. When not being an athlete on the rugby field, or crunching down numbers on a computer for work, he delicately pens the epiphanies from life and its different relationships and encounters. He writes about all sorts of topics, finding a way to relate them with each other, because no one theme exists in a vacuum. Empathy is sometimes considered a gift, and Jude has it in abundance.

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Hello Jude. I’m so glad you’re here.

Hi Colleen. Thanks for having me stop by.

Jude, how long have you been writing syllabic poetry? And tell us what’s the first form of syllabic poetry you wrote?

– I have written syllabic poetry for two years now. The first form I tried was a haiku. I wrote a number of them until I was ready to have a go at tankas, cinquains, shadorma, Etherees, and so many others. Many poets and writers think syllabic poetry is restrictive and inhibits creativity, but I quickly found that this couldn’t be further from the truth.

I can only compare my experience with syllabic forms to magic with a system. The forms channel your creativity, and the more you write through them, the more you realize their boundless potential. Yes, they have rules, but much more purpose. And when inspiration is thin, they are always there to seduce the magic out of you.

YES! I’m so happy to hear that you feel that way about writing syllabic poetry. It is definitely magical. So have you written a poetry book? Tell us about the book, and why you wrote it.

– Yes, I wrote and published my first poetry book in May 2021, titled CROSSROADS (Winds of love). I wrote it to give companionship to lonely souls, to soothe broken hearts, and to lend gratitude to those with special paramours, but also to aid us in learning to love ourselves. I also wrote it to entertain, with its spluttering of short poetic stories. Of course, about a quarter of it are syllabic forms, because as I said earlier; they are magic.

Jude, how has writing and publishing a novel changed you as a poet?

-I have just finished writing and doing the majority of the editing for my debut novel, “Realms of the Mist” (coming this April 2022).

Writing a novel has indeed changed me as a poet. It is different from writing poetry, as you have to tame/wilt down the urge to use poetry’s beautiful and sometimes superfluous prose and rhythm. And yet poetry has been an invaluable asset in finding my author-voice and improving my prose.

In turn, writing a novel has almost subconsciously ensured that my poetry is always meaningful (even if it’s an underlying theme), because despite a novel’s greater length, every part of the story must carry value.

Thank you Colleen, for hosting me. It’s such a pleasure, especially as I got most of my syllabic knowledge from you and your amazing site.

Jude, that is the highest praise ever! Thank you. 🙏🏻

I’ll close by saying that my upcoming novel, “Realms of the Mist” might really be worth it for potential readers. Here’s a little teaser:

Thanks so much for stopping by to share your poetry book with us, Jude. I’m looking forward to your new book and to reading your poetry book. Thanks for being a part of poetry community.

Learn more about this poet by visiting his blog and the links below:

Twitter: @jude_clutch https://twitter.com/jude_clutch

blog: Tales Told Different https://wordeologist.wordpress.com/

Amazon

Thanks for stopping in to meet Jude. Stop by his blog, you’ll enjoy his poetry.

Meet the Poet: D. L. Finn

Welcome to Meet the Poet, a Word Craft Poetry feature written to introduce you to the poets in our writing community. This is a way to get to more about the poet and their work. Did you know many of our poets are accomplished fiction and non-fiction authors? Some of our poets are also artists, crafting their magic through watercolors or other artistic means along with the written word.

At least once a month, I’ll be introducing you to the poets in our community! Grab a cup of tea or coffee, and meet the poet!


Our first guest is D. L. Finn, aka Denise Finn.

D. L. Finn is an independent California local who encourages everyone to embrace their inner child. She was born and raised in the foggy Bay Area, but in 1990 she relocated with her husband, kids, dogs, and cats to Nevada City, in the Sierra foothills. She immersed herself in reading all types of books but especially loved romance, horror, and fantasy. She always treasured creating her own reality on paper. Finally, surrounded by towering pines, oaks, and cedars, her creativity was nurtured until it bloomed. Her creations include children’s books, adult fiction, a unique autobiography, and poetry. She continues on her adventure with an open invitation to all readers to join her.

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Hello Denise. I’m so glad you’re here.

Hi Colleen. Thanks for having me stop by.

Denise, you’ve been writing poetry for a couple of years now on the #TankaTuesday challenges. What is your favorite syllabic form, and why is it your favorite? 

I like many forms for different reasons, but since my first attempt with syllabic poetry was with a haiku that holds a special place in my poetic heart. I love the challenge of putting an image into three short lines. Focusing on nature is a favorite pastime of mine.

 The runner-ups are tanka, haibun, and butterfly cinquain.

Not long ago, I saw a post that said you were making gift calendars from your photos and poetry. Can you describe your process? Do you use any apps or special programs? Who does the printing for the calendar? Please add anything else you think would help other poets create their own calendars.

Making calendars started several years ago following some photography classes I took in college. After my classes were done, I was looking for a good reason to continue taking my nature photos beyond sitting in photo albums or on my phone. 

© D. L. Finn, Poet & Author

So, I came up with making a calendar using my nature shots and sending it out as my holiday gift to family and friends. It was a big hit for many years, but I felt like it was getting old. I was going to stop doing it when I came up with a new idea to add haikus to my photos. This allowed me to blend two things I love doing, taking pictures and writing poetry. This will be my second year of doing haiku calendars for friends and family.

© D. L. Finn

It is a simple process for me. I combine my photos and text on Canva. I can spend hours finding just the right text for the words. I learned after last year to make it the right size for the calendar, which is 11 inches x 8 inches, so I don’t run into issues later with the text.

I’ve used Costco to print and ship these calendars because the quality is so good, and it’s simple for me. I plan to investigate a cost-effective way of doing it next year and making it available on my website. I have been considering expanding to more items than calendars and perhaps trying to sell them locally at first. I know Canva offers this service, although I haven’t tried it yet. Esty is something I’m going to explore too.

I think your photographic haiga calendars would be a huge hit! I know I’ll be interested in purchasing a calendar like that for my home. So with that in mind, what are your goals as a poet?

 I don’t have any goals as a poet other than to put out a book here and there and do challenges. That’s what I like about poetry, that I can enjoy what I do putting no pressure on myself, unlike when I write a novel. It’s a place where I can process my emotions and the things I see. My creativity is allowed to roam when I write poetry in any form, even on the back of a Harley, which I included in my verse book, Just Her Poetry.

Poems are a place where I am fully allowed just to be me, and why I included poetry in my memoir, No Fairy Tale.

I agree. Poetry gives us the opportunity to share some of ourselves with others. Does your poetry writing help you in your novel-writing process?

When I write poetry, I’m showing what I’m feeling or seeing. It’s done with limited words, so I must carefully choose each word I use. When I write a novel, I think about this and try to make each word count and “show” instead of telling like I do when writing poetry. I’ve found poetry, especially symbolism, has expanded my world when I write stories. I tend to be wordy and use the same old word repeatedly. Plus, I’m guilty of telling and over-showing, especially in my first drafts or earlier stories. 

Poetry provides a good foundation for writing scenes in a story. There is nothing I love more than to see a beautifully described moment when I’m reading. Poetry is woven into that, and that’s what I strive to accomplish in my work. I think this is so important that I’ve written posts about it on my blog and over on Story Empire where I also write.

© D. L. Finn on her Harley

Thanks so much for stopping by to share your poetry calendar idea with us, Denise. I can’t wait to see one of your calendars finished. What a great idea for poets to share their poetry. You get a gold ⭐️ for creativity!

Learn more about this poet by visiting her blog and the links below:

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Pinterest

D.L. Finn blog

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Thanks for stopping by to learn more about poet, D.L. Finn. Remember books make excellent gifts. <3

CONVERSATIONS WITH COLLEEN: MEET THE POET, Jude Itakali

Welcome to an extra feature on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry, which highlights the poets in our writing community. It’s a chance for readers to get to know the people behind the poetry and the books. It’s a great way to share our love for writing poetry with others.

This week I’m thrilled to bring you, Jude Itakali and his first book of poetry! “Crossroads (Winds of Love)” releases May 17, 2021, and is available for pre-order now.

Jude Itakali was born and lives in Kampala, Uganda. He is publishing his first collected works, “CROSSROADS (Winds of love).”

When not being an athlete on the rugby field, or crunching down numbers on a computer for work, he delicately pens the epiphanies from life and its different relationships and encounters.

He writes about all sorts of topics, finding a way to relate them with each other because no one theme exists in a vacuum.

Empathy is sometimes considered a gift, and Jude has it in abundance.

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Jude has taken part in Tanka Tuesday for a few years now. Each week I look forward to his special brand of poetic magic. Welcome, Jude!

Hi, Colleen. Thanks so much for this interview. I’m really looking forward to our chat.

Great! I wanted to ask you a few questions so we could all learn more about you. Here we go! What got you started writing poetry? Why did you stick with it?

I love poetry because of its ability to touch many people, and yet still touch each one in a particular way. I admire the creativity it gives and the outlet for emotions that might otherwise fester within. The ability to exercise the breadth of language to pass on a message has always captivated me because it touches and evokes much deeper than plain direct words.

I write poetry because through it, I can share concerns, happiness, emotions, and awareness in ways that people can read and enjoy freely and openly.

I agree, Jude. We write poetry to connect with others. So, if you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

I’d tell my younger self to stop hoarding his writing and get in touch with people who like reading and writing early enough. Doors would have opened much earlier. Plus to get his writing out there through a blog or site, and read a lot more with the aim of learning, as well as enjoying the read.

How has publishing your first book changed your writing process?

Publishing my first book has not really changed my writing process, but put an emphasis on quality, so that I keep learning, and keep improving in order to curve a niche for myself in the vast array of amazing writers and talent out there.

Thanks, Jude. What is “Crossroads (Winds of Love)” about?

In the corridors of love, at the crossroads of loneliness, we stand at our most vulnerable. As the winds of love swirl, we are often ill-prepared for the portends and promises that they carry. The longing, lust, fear, and deception. But also the hope, renewal, and lessons of love. In this book, may we be strengthened by the memory of things we have survived, soothed with the understanding of perspective, and comforted with the hope of things yet to come.

May these poems, prose and short stories touch each of us in our own particular way.

It sounds like an amazing read, Jude. I’ve added the links below:

Kindle Amazon.com

You can find Jude on his blog, Tales Told Different. Look for his poems. You’ll be glad you did!

Thanks for stopping by to meet Jude. <3

Word craft ~ Prose & poetry “MEET THE POET,” Featuring @Marjorie_Mallon

Welcome to a new feature on wordcraftpoetry.com, which highlights the poets in our writing community. Get to know the people behind the poetry and the books. It’s a great way to share our love for writing poetry with others.

Today’s guest is Marjorie Mallon. She’s a frequent participant in our Tanka Tuesday challenges. I’ve known Marje since we both started blogging back in 2014! Time flies when you’re having fun!

Author and Poet: Marjorie Mallon

AUTHOR BIO

My alter ego is MJ – Mary Jane from Spiderman. I love superheros!

On the 17th of November I was born, in Lion City: Singapore, (a passionate Scorpio, with the Chinese Zodiac sign a lucky rabbit.) My early childhood was spent in Hong Kong. During my teen years, my parents returned to my father’s birthplace, Edinburgh, where I spent many happy years. As a teenager, I travelled to many far-flung destinations. It’s rumoured that I now live in the Venice of Cambridge, with my six-foot hunk of a Rock God husband. My two enchanted daughters have almost flown the nest, but often return with a cheery smile to greet me.

During the day, I work in an international sixth form with students from around the world. I’m the meet and greet lady who welcomes them to their new college and issues them with late slips when they don’t get to their lessons on time!

I write YA fantasy, paranormal, horror/supernatural short stories, flash fiction and short form poetry. More recently, I have produced and compiled an anthology/compilation set during the early stages of COVID-19 entitled This Is Lockdown. Following on from this, in February 2021 I will be releasing Lockdown Innit, poems about absurdity which will be available in kindle and shortly after release in paperback. 

I’ve been blogging for many moons at my blog home Kyrosmagica, which means Crystal Magic. From time to time I write articles celebrating the spiritual realm, inspiration and my love of nature, crystals and all things magical, mystical, and mysterious.

My eclectic blog shares my three loves: reading,  writing, and creativity. I adore reading and have written over 150 reviews on my blog: https://mjmallon.com/2015/09/28/a-z-of-my-book-reviews/

Marje has a new book out called Lockdown Innit. I had to ask her what the word “Innit” meant. Basically, its British slang for “Isn’t it?” That should give you a clue as to the humor in this poetry collection. Here’s a bit about the book:

Lockdown Innit is a poetry collection of eighteen poems about life’s absurdities and frustrations during lockdown. Wherever you live in this world, this is for you. Expect humour, a dollop of banter and ridiculous rants here and there. Amongst other delights, witness the strange antics of a swan posing by a bin and two statuesque horses appearing like arc deco pieces in a field. Check out the violin player on a tightrope, or the cheeky unmentionables wafting in the lockdown breeze!

Preorder Buying Links Lockdown Innit Releases TODAY: February 26th

Kindle Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B08VW81Q53/

Kindle Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08VW81Q53/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/56949934-lockdown-innit

Universal link for kindle: https://mybook.to/Lockdowninnit

Our Interview

Marje, what got you started writing poetry?

I started writing poetry and diaries at a young age. Then, other distractions came along: boys, followed by marriage, work, and children. I know that sounds somewhat cliched, but it took me a long time to rediscover my interest and love of poetry. If I hadn’t started blogging, I might never have. My re-introduction to poetry began with Ronovan Writes poetry prompts, I wrote short form three line haiku to begin with. Thereafter, I joined your weekly Tanka Tuesday, Colleen. I’ve never looked back. Colleen has an outstanding poetry blog full of advice on all types of poetry.Through Colleen’s guidance pages, I’ve had fun trying many different forms.

What is your favorite poetry form?

Ah, Colleen, that is a difficult question! I still love the Tanka form, preferring it to Haiku as it gives me two more lines to say what I’d like to!

I also love poems that form a shape on the page, such as the Etheree and the Cinquain. In my new poetry collection Lockdown Innit there is a wide variety to choose from, including free verse poetry, a Tanka, and an Etheree.

I tried a couple of new forms— the daisy chain form which was fun and the decastich—Egg timer Poem, which I discovered via this link on your blog, Colleen:

The Poet’s Collective features an index of Syllabic Poetry Forms. Check it out!

Here’s the detail of the poems I tried:

Egg Timer – A decastich (10 line poem)
Syllabic 5/4/3/2/1/1/2/3/4/5
Unrhymed
Formulaic: The last five lines are the mirror image of the first five lines.
Centered or not, at the poet’s discretion.

Daisy Chain The last word in the line becomes the first word of the next line. To end the poem, the last word is the same as the first word.

The Butterfly Cinquain: An  unrhymed 9 line poem.
syllabic, 2-4-6-8-2-8-6-4-2 syllables per line.

Here is an example of the Butterfly Cinquain form from Lockdown Innit:

Image credit: MJ Mallon
Horses
 Grazing on grass
 Unaware they are watched
 Still, like symmetrical statues
 Nose down
 Three leafy shrubs oddly aligned
 How bizarre this scene is
 My eyes observe
 Lockdown

 © M J Mallon

The image of the horses captured my attention so much that I used it as a focal point for my book cover image. The collection focuses on the strange things I have observed, felt, or experienced during lockdown.

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

Keep on writing!

I regret I didn’t return to writing for such a long time. When I became a mum, I devoted all my energies to my children and lost myself a little. I do, and I don’t regret that. I have two lovely girls who mean the world to me. It’s only now that my much-loved daughters are young adults that I’m finding more time, energy and enthusiasm to write.

Also, when I was younger, I lacked the confidence that I have now. I’ve grown so much as a person through blogging and writing. It literally has changed my life, and has introduced me to so many people, such a wonderfully supportive community. I’m blessed and obsessed! 

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

That’s an interesting question. I wrote my first book, a YA Fantasy, The Curse of Time #1 Bloodstone in a whirlwind of imaginative ideas. I woke up each morning with an action reel whizzing in my mind. This still happens to me, I often awaken with an incredible burst of energy, and rush to jot down a storyline. I still get a huge buzz when this happens. In fact, it happened to me this morning!

Writing your first novel changes your writing process. I was lucky to have so much help, support and encouragement with my debut novel. I owe particular thanks to Colleen for her meticulous beta reading, which became a full-scale kindness of her heart editing, and prior to that to Graham Cumming for reading through the first draft and commenting on many suggested improvements. It is crucial to have a fresh pair of eyes, beta readers, and a trusted editor to read your work. All of which I have, I am so grateful to my beta readers and to the blogging community for all they do for me.

All writers have weaknesses, or excesses! I excel at imaginative ideas but have to work harder at dialogue and plotting. To a degree, I still resist plotting. I prefer the ideas to flow organically, but the key is to get the balance right. Balance is as important in all aspects of life as it is in the art of writing. So now, I play to my strengths, making sure that I have all the unique elements on a page, in the correct quantities! Dialogue, engaging characters, scenes, peaks and troughs, all working together to ensure that the crazy plot stands up to scrutiny. I continue to work at my craft, loving each step along the way. I am pretty stubborn! I never give up, even if the task seems almost insurmountable.

And believe me, the second in my YA series The Curse of Time #2 Golden Healer, is an immense challenge, one that I will work on completing later this year.

Lockdown Innit is my first book dedicated to poetry and nothing else.

My previous books, The Curse of Time, Mr. Sagittarius, and the anthology/compilation This Is Lockdown all include poetry.

This alone is indicative of how much I love poetry that it surreptitiously creeps in everywhere!

Thanks so much for stopping by Marje. I’ll make sure and add this book to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Book Store where I share the Amazon Author links to the books published by the regular participants of the Tanka Tuesday Weekly Poetry Challenge. Many of these books include poetry, short stories, and essays. If you’re looking for a gift, this is the perfect place to begin your shopping journey. Books make thoughtful gifts.

Look for Marje:

Authors Website:https://mjmallon.com
Authors Amazon Pagehttps://www.amazon.co.uk/M-J-Mallon/e/B074CGNK4L
Twitter: @Marjorie_Mallon

#ABRSCAuthors Bloggers Rainbow Support Club on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1829166787333493/
Goodreads:https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17064826.M_J_Mallon

BookBub: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/m-j-mallon 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mjmallonauthor/