“Swift Unbridled Sea,” #haiku, & A Discussion of Using Implied Metaphors in Haiku

Sally Cronin provided this week’s image for our Photo Prompt challenge.

Today, I want to talk about using metaphors in your poetry. First, let’s discuss what a metaphor is.

The Grammarly blog explains that “a metaphor is a figure of speech that describes an object or action in such a way that it isn’t literally true, but the description helps to explain an idea or make a comparison. A metaphor states that one thing is another thing.”

Image by Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay

My favorite example of this is the saying, “You’re the black sheep of the family.” Literally, we know this to not be true because humans aren’t sheep. But, in a metaphorical sense, a black sheep is someone different from the rest of their family members. So, if someone says, “metaphorically speaking” I wouldn’t take their statement for the truth, but would think of what they said as an idea of some sort.

In haiku, we do not use the words, “like or as” to show our metaphor, and we don’t use similes. We should never use a metaphor like this when writing haiku. Instead, we should use an implied metaphor.

Literary Devices.net says:

“Implied Metaphor is a literary device used in prose and poetry to compare two unlikely things, with common characteristics without mentioning one of the objects of comparison. It is implied in the texts to make imagery rich and effective and also to make subjects relatable and understandable to the readers. In this sense, it enables them to grasp the complex phenomenon discussed in the text. Moreover, the appropriate use of implied metaphor appeals to the sense of hearing and makes readers comprehend what is being communicated to them.”

literarydevices.net

So how do we use implied metaphor in our haiku? Think of it this way. We take two objects and compare and contrast them. This creates a juxtaposition, which is an understatement, since true haiku should state nothing. The meaning is always implied and left up to the reader to interpret.

Back to Sally’s photo. I looked at the image and saw metaphors everywhere. The reason we use an implied metaphor is that the meaning is personally felt and interpreted by the reader. In poetry, we want to forge that kind of connection.

Here is my untitled 5/7/5 haiku:

swift unbridled sea
breakers spill out with laughter
foam tickles my toes

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

What is the implied metaphor? If you said, breakers spill out with laughter, you’d be right. I compared the swift unbridled sea to breakers laughing as they break against the shore while the sea foam tickles my toes. In reality, waves don’t laugh, as that is a human trait. This literary technique is called personification.

I wanted to convey a sense of playfulness in this haiku. However, anyone who’s ever seen an angry sea churning away and eroding a beach during a storm knows there is nothing playful about the ocean. The sea’s destructive powers are well documented.

Examine the famous poem by Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Birds Sings.” (The poem is halfway down the page).

Literary Devices.net explains

“The poem exhibits racial segregation and social discrimination prevalent against the black community in American society.  She has used two metaphors in the poem; the first metaphor is of the “free bird” that is for the white people, while the “caged bird” is the metaphor of African American people and their detention in the social norms.

Using this implied metaphor of a bird, Maya Angelou explores the ideas of freedom, equality, and justice in the text. She skilfully contrasts the freedom of the free bird and the alienation and captivity of the caged bird by using this metaphor.”

Literary Devices.net/implied-metaphor

I used this poem not to discuss social issues, but to help explain the use of metaphor in poetry.

When we use photo prompts for our poetry, we don’t want to describe what is in the photo. The photo is for our inspiration. We want our reader to infer something from our poetry they can’t see in the photo. We want to surprise them with our observations.

Experiment with your use of implied metaphors. It will help you achieve your goal of showing and not telling.

“All Forgiven in a Day,” #kindku “Dawn”

I’ve wanted to try this new poetry challenge offered by Auroras & Blossoms poetry journal in the post below. It’s the “Dawn,” Prompt, created by Cendrine & David.

Here is the link to the words in the song: https://genius.com/Leigh-nash-nervous-in-the-light-of-dawn-lyrics which serve as the inspiration for the poetry you write.

First… What Is a Kindku?

Auroras & Blossoms says:

The Kindku is an invitation to promote kindness, positivity and inspiration through poetry. As the last two letters of the name indicate, it is based on Japanese poetry forms like the haiku and tanka.”

The Rules

The Kindku is a short poem of seven lines and 43 syllables. The syllable pattern is 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 or 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5.

The Kindku must include seven words that are taken from one specific source — a poem, a book, a newspaper article, etc. In the case of a book or long piece of writing, those words must come from the same page.

Words must be used in the order they were found. Their placement also depends on the line:

  • Line 1 starts with word 1
  • Line 2 ends with word 2
  • Line 3 starts with word 3
  • Line 4 ends with word 4
  • Line 5 starts with word 5
  • Line 6 ends with word 6
  • Line 7 starts or ends with word 7

Kindku poems can have titles and punctuation. No matter the topic covered, they must sport a positive tone.

Kindku poets are encouraged to credit and link to the inspirations behind their pieces.

First, I listened to the song and then picked the seven words: “…storm grey clouds hovering above silence all…” (Nervous in the Light of Dawn lyrics)

Next I created a chart using the 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 syllable count:

  • First line: 7 syllables: start with “storm”
  • Second line: 5 syllables: end with “grey”
  • Third line: 7 syllables: start with “clouds”
  • Fourth line: 5 syllables: end with “hovering”
  • Fifth line: 7 syllables: start with “above”
  • Sixth line: 5 syllables: end with “silence”
  • Seventh line: 7 syllables: start with “all”

I use the syllable counter at How Many Syllables.com to compose my KindKu.

Image by Albrecht Fietz from Pixabay

“All Forgiven in a Day,” #kindku

storm erupts with feral song
dawn shifts into grey
clouds swell like waves in the sea
pale brume hovering
above the fray, the rainbow—
redeems the silence
all forgiven in a day

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

What do you think? By participating in the challenge, they could select your poem to appear in the Aurora & Blossoms Journal. Click HERE for the prompt post.

This was a fun challenge! It really got my creative juices flowing. Try it!

“Freyja,” #Shadorma #poetry

Anita Dawes provided this week’s #SynonymsOnly poetry challenge words: blessed & hex. These are excellent opposites to work with in a longer poem featuring one or more stanzas. Unfortunately, my time was limited this week by all kinds of minor niggling issues. Yet, I still worked through the problems!

I’m happy to announce that I completed the first draft of Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry! Now it’s on to my editors.

This has been such a fulfilling experience to write about something I love so much. I believe this book will be a brilliant start for those who would love to write syllabic poetry, but feel intimidated by the rules and the counting of syllables. Most of all, I want people who don’t think they can write poetry to try the forms we work with in our challenges. Writing poetry makes us better writers!

Life with a kitten has been brilliant fun for Ron and I. My little furry beast is purring sweetly one minute and hanging from the curtains the next. Freyja is in the toddler stage now, pushing her luck and seeing how far she can get. She has her first vet appointment on Friday, which should have her mad at me for a few hours!

I immediately thought of her when I read the prompt words! I’ll be using the word fortunate, for blessed; and hocus-pocus for the word hex.

“Freyja,” #Shadorma

golden eyed
ebony beauty,
fortunate
enchantressbeware the powers of a
hocus-pocus cat!

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

I composed this shadorma poem with the help of a little black cat magic!

#Fairy #Tarot #Friday ~ July 17, 2020

Welcome to Fairy Tarot Friday. Each Friday I’ll share a card from the Fairy Tarot deck by Doreen Virtue & Radleigh Valentine, featuring an uplifting message from the fey. I’ll also include a bit of syllabic poetry inspired by the card reading.

The Major Arcana contains 22 cards that describe major events and turning points in our lives (marriage, pregnancy, relationship and career changes, and overcoming personal challenges). The Major Arcana cards also represent the different phases from childhood to old age.

Doreen Virtue numbered the Minor Arcana cards to comprise four suits representing unique aspects of human life. They number the Minor Arcana cards 1 (Ace) through 10, plus the four court cards (Princess, Prince, Queen, and King). The Minor Arcana reflects the day-to-day aspects of our lives and the people in them. Court cards represent either a situation or a person during a reading.

The Minor Arcana comprises four suits. In traditional Tarot they are; wands, cups, swords, and coins. In Fairy Tarot, the four suits reflect the seasons: Spring for wands, Summer for cups, Winter for swords, and Autumn for coins. In Angel Tarot, the seasons represent the four elements: fire = spring, water = summer, air = winter, and earth = autumn. Consider these elements in relation to the Fairy Tarot, as well.

These divinatory meanings are for the upright cards only—this tarot is not intended for reversed readings.

Once you get to know the fairies, you’ll see they are strong-willed environmentalists. They get perturbed at people who mistrust animals or the earth. Never lie to a fairy. Instead, help them take care of the planet and other living beings. Do your part. Your actions will richly reward you, and the fairies will encourage you in amazing ways.

Today’s Card: The Prince of Winter ~ Intellectual, Determined, Focused, Impulsive

Happy Friday! Wow, the Prince of Winter moves at the speed of light. Don’t blink or you might miss him.

When this card shows up, you know you’re in for some quick action! This little fairy’s mind moves fast, and he can assess a situation quickly which allows him to get right to work. This is great energy for completing projects that you started but didn’t finish.

Remember, when this fairy’s on a mission, you may as well stand back and let him take charge, because he will, whether or not you want him to! Breathe into this potential and use it to your advantage. This is the time to act quickly and decisively. Be prepared for sudden or unexpected changes.

By drawing this card we know we are also dealing with idealistic, decisive, focused, and determined energy. Expect decisions to become a little impulsive and undiplomatic, which is much of the energy swirling around in U.S. politics at the moment. Keep your eye on what they do and not what they say!

Concerning any of your own projects and aims, my best advice is to pause and reflect before you set any plans into motion. Weigh out all your options. Is this plan as sound as it seems? What are you not seeing? Seek an intellectual solution to your issue.

Additional meanings of this card: Believing strongly in your mission. Fighting for justice. Sudden or unexpected changes. Intellectual solutions to problems.

“Use your Brain” #senryu

solve problems wisely—
trust science, not politics
just put on a mask!

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

“Stone Ghosts” – A #ButterflyCinquain

Image by JamesDeMers from Pixabay

“Stone Ghosts”

stone ghosts
the false idols
of a treasonous past
dedicated to slavery
hateful
tokens of white supremacy
the darkness of death waits
Patriarchy
shattered

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Today, I heard the phrase, “stone ghosts” and felt compelled to put pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard). The name resonated and touched a chord deep within my soul.

We’re at the pinnacle of a great change. I feel the ripples of hope flowing like waves across the land. Taste the salt of your tears, for the stone ghosts are falling. This American carnage will be defeated.

So Mote it be!

#Fairy #Tarot #Friday ~ July 10, 2020

Welcome to Fairy Tarot Friday. Each Friday I’ll share a card from the Fairy Tarot deck by Doreen Virtue & Radleigh Valentine, featuring an uplifting message from the fey. I’ll also include a bit of syllabic poetry inspired by the card reading.

The Major Arcana contains 22 cards that describe major events and turning points in our lives (marriage, pregnancy, relationship and career changes, and overcoming personal challenges). The Major Arcana cards also represent the different phases from childhood to old age.

Doreen Virtue numbered the Minor Arcana cards to comprise four suits representing different aspects of human life. They number the Minor Arcana cards 1 (Ace) through 10, plus the four court cards (Princess, Prince, Queen, and King). The Minor Arcana reflects the day-to-day aspects of our lives and the people in them. Court cards represent either a situation or a person during a reading.

The Minor Arcana comprises four suits. In traditional Tarot they are; wands, cups, swords, and coins. In Fairy Tarot, the four suits reflect the seasons: Spring for wands, Summer for cups, Winter for swords, and Autumn for coins. In Angel Tarot, the seasons represent the four elements: fire = spring, water = summer, air = winter, and earth = autumn. Consider these elements in relation to the Fairy Tarot, as well.

The divinatory meanings are given for upright cards only—this tarot is not intended for reversed readings.

Once you get to know the fairies, you’ll see they are strong-willed environmentalists. They get perturbed at people who mistrust animals or the earth. Never lie to a fairy. Instead, help them take care of the planet and other living beings. Do your part. Your actions will richly reward you, and the fairies will encourage you in amazing ways.

Today’s Card ~ The Nine of Spring

Happy Fairy Tarot Friday! Do you remember last week we celebrated our accomplishments by rejoicing in our successes from dedication and self discipline with the Chariot card?

Well, this week, it seems logical that we would find ourselves at the place where we need to protect those accomplishments. The Nine of Spring reminds us that as our hard work pays off and we have more to show for our efforts, it’s imperative that we look after the fruits of our labors.

We all know the energy in the universe can be intense with all the happenings in our world. Between the Corona Virus pandemic and people losing jobs because of the virus, we also have an awakening of human rights awareness (or lack thereof) resonating around the world. Here in America we’ve got our hands full.

My advice is every morning as you begin your day, ask your god(s), the angels, and even the fairies to protect you from negative people and energies. Try to see both sides of a situation with compassion and intelligence. I know you’re up to the task!

This card also shines a light on the environmentalists and those who love all the plants and animals provided to us by the mother goddess (Mother Earth).

The Nine of Spring reminds us to stand up for important causes, such as protecting wildlife, the oceans, and our food sources.

Notice the beautiful fairy who stands in defense of the newly blossoming daffodils in her garden. Joined by her ladybug friends, she shows unity with nature in her cause.

Additional meanings of this card: Protect what you’ve created. Prepare for challenges that lie ahead. Having a strong immune system. Keeping your resolve.

Protect the Fruits of Your Labors

stay aware—
look for challenges
wear a mask!

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Be Careful What You Wish For… #Double Nonet

I haven’t taken part in my own poetry challenge for a couple of weeks. I’m getting down to the nitty gritty on Word Craft ~ the Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry and I’m still hunting for a few poetry forms. So, this double nonet will serve as an example to that specific form. I might add… the only example.

Finding poetry examples for the book from your blogs opened my eyes. We all have our favorite forms that we like to write. No surprise there. Some of you have a tendency to only write one form of poetry, that’s it!

I was surprised to learn that many of you had not experimented with the other syllabic poetry forms from the challenge. I hope after last week’s successes with the haibun form that some of you will venture out and try a few more. Who knows? It might inspire you to compile a collection of your poetry into a book!

The Double Nonet

A classic nonet is a nine-line poem, with a syllable count of 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. You can create this form with any number of nine-line stanzas following the original or leave it as a single verse. In my example below, I wrote two separate nine-line stanzas featuring a syllable count of 9/8/7/6/5/4/3/2/1, 9/8/7/6/5/4/3/2/1. However, you could create a double (reversed) nonet with a syllable count of 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9, 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9 syllables per line.

All Double nonet poetry needs a theme to make it cohesive. I like to leave a blank line between the stanzas, but you don’t have to. Write about the things important to you and don’t forget to use vivid descriptions.

In my piece below, in the first stanza, I write about climate change and how I imagine a scenario where the mother goddess (Gaia, or mother earth) brings rain to stop the fires ravaging the earth. While in the second stanza, I explain the consequences of too much rain.

The idea is to compare and contrast two things. There should be some kind of connection between the nonet stanzas.

You can create double haiku, double senryu, double tanka, double gogyohka, double cinquain, double etheree, and double nonet poetry. In fact, any of these forms can become longer poems by adding more stanzas, which is excellent information to know when the poetry contest you want to enter asks for longer poetry. You’ve got this!

Image by My pictures are CC0. When doing composings: from Pixabay

“Be Careful What you Wish for…”

Wind, the calming breath of the goddess
brought moisture to the thirsty earth.
Water, the life source endured
quenched the fires and flames
that stoked climate change
across our lands.
This rebirth
brings us
life.

Storm remnants ebb into silvered mists
where sky and water join as one.
I struggle for air above
the rising ocean tides,
as shrill sea bird screams
welcome me to
a fresh day
without
land.

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Thanks for reading.

#Fairy #Tarot #Friday ~ July 3, 2020

Welcome back to Fairy Tarot Friday. Each Friday I’ll share a card from the Fairy Tarot deck by Doreen Virtue & Radleigh Valentine, featuring an uplifting message from the fey. I’ll also include a bit of syllabic poetry inspired by the card reading.

The Major Arcana contains 22 cards that describe major events and turning points in our lives (marriage, pregnancy, relationship and career changes, and overcoming personal challenges). The Major Arcana cards also represent the different phases from childhood to old age.

Doreen Virtue numbered the Minor Arcana cards to comprise four suits representing different aspects of human life. They number the Minor Arcana cards 1 (Ace) through 10, plus the four court cards (Princess, Prince, Queen, and King). The Minor Arcana reflects the day-to-day aspects of our lives and the people in them. Court cards represent either a situation or a person during a reading.

The Minor Arcana comprises four suits. In traditional Tarot they are; wands, cups, swords, and coins. In Fairy Tarot, the four suits reflect the seasons: Spring for wands, Summer for cups, Winter for swords, and Autumn for coins. In Angel Tarot, the seasons represent the four elements: fire = spring, water = summer, air = winter, and earth = autumn. Consider these elements in relation to the Fairy Tarot, as well.

The divinatory meanings are given for upright cards only—this tarot is not intended for reversed readings.

Once you get to know the fairies, you’ll see they are strong-willed environmentalists. They get perturbed at people who mistrust animals or the earth. Never lie to a fairy. Instead, help them take care of the planet and other living beings. Do your part. Your actions will richly reward you, and the fairies will encourage you in amazing ways.

Today’s Card: The Chariot

What a fantastic draw! Freyja, the wise woman’s apprentice picked this card today. She seemed to be a natural!

“The Chariot,” from the Major Arcana, signifies that you’ve done great work so far! Of course, you still have many priorities that you are balancing at the same time. It couldn’t be any other way. Be prepared. You may be called upon to keep control of more than one driving force at a time. stay centered, strong, and determined. I know you will accomplish your goal!

Remain steadfast in your sense of purpose, and don’t allow other influences to steer you off course. If you keep at it, you can accomplish far more than you realize.

This card also reminds us that it’s your moment to step into the spotlight. Drawing attention to yourself or your work can feel awkward, but it’s absolutely essential at this time for you to make this move. Don’t hesitate! Show people what you’ve got.

Be genuine and optimistic in your interactions with people and the public. Your excitement for your goals will shine through and your confidence will increase. Be proud of your accomplishments.

Notice the faery charioteer who leads two dragonflies. These magical creatures have the ability to go in any direction—and at amazing speeds! The fact that this faery can keep the dragonflies under control and headed in the right direction is a testament to her determination and skill. You possess these same qualities!

Additional meanings of this card:

Self-control. Victory! Celebrate what you’ve achieved. Accomplish your dreams. Modes of transportation, and work-related travel figure into this card, as well.

“Step Up and Take a Bow,” #Shadorma

stay centered
focused and driven,
celebrate—
it's your time
draw attention to your work
your confidence soars

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

#TarotTuesday – The World – Writing and Music: Jan Sikes

I’m in the home stretch of finishing Word Craft – Prose & Poetry, my How-To book on how to write syllabic poetry for beginners. In the meantime, my #Fairy #Tarot #Friday readings have been put on hold.

But, never fear… Jan Sikes is here with her amazing #TarotTuesday spot on her blog. Please, enjoy. Her readings keep me sane in crazy times.

Source: #TarotTuesday – The World – Writing and Music

“Books That Changed Me”– 2020 Summer Edition! @ColleenChesebro @dehauthor @jhawker69 @boom_lyn – Author D.L. Finn

This is a re-blog of D.L. Finn’s post, below. I was honored and thrilled for my book, Fairies, Myths, and Magic ~ A Summer Celebration, to make Denise’s “Books that Changed Me,” Summer edition list.

There are other authors and books listed as well. Please have a read. You might find your next favorite book.

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“The longest day of the year has arrived along with thoughts of swimming in our lakes and rivers. It’s the perfect time of the year to lounge under the stars gazing at the possibilities while being serenaded by the crickets. Yes, summer is here, and when I’m not swimming or watching for a comet to streak across the sky, I will be reading and posting my reviews.”

“Today there will be a different look for my “Books That Changed Me” Summer Edition. I’ve changed the format and won’t be re-sharing my reviews for the books anymore. I want to focus more on the stories or poems that moved me enough to “change” me…”

Read more:

Source: “Books That Changed Me”– 2020 Summer Edition! @ColleenChesebro @dehauthor @jhawker69 @boom_lyn – Author D.L. Finn