#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 211, #Abhanga, or #PoetsChoice

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the first of the month and you know what that means! Word Crafters, choose your own syllabic poetry form, theme, words, images, etc. It’s up to you! This opportunity only happens once a month!

WAIT…

Are you looking for inspiration for your syllabic poetry? Find an image on Pixabay.com or experiment with “found poetry” to find some inspiration. Another option is to try some magnetic poetry. You still have to count syllables, but it’s like putting together a puzzle! Use this opportunity to try a new form!

The Poet’s Collective features an index of Syllabic Poetry Forms. Check it out!

WAIT!! I have a new rhyming scheme syllabic poem, I want to introduce. This form is called the Abhanga.

Abhanga, “the completion” is a stanzaic form commonly used for devotional poetic composition, although it has also been used for cynicism, satire and reflective moods. It was popular from the 13th thru 17th centuries Marathi Region of India and is described as complex and classic. (poetrymagnumopus.com)

The elements of the Abhanga are:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of 4 line stanzas.
  • syllabic, 6-6-6-4 syllables each
  • rhymed L2 and L3 rhyme. Often internal rhyme is employed. End rhyme scheme x a a x , x being unrhymed.

Here is my example:

magic is found within
breathe deep into your core
open your heart and soar
find inner peace

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

I’ll add this form to the list this week. Have fun!

Don’t forget to add the URL of your published poem in Mr. Linky below.

For this challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet below, and/or any other syllabic form you’d like to try.

Here are some impressive sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

writerlywords.com/syllables/

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Renga, Solo-Renga, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, and Shadorma, Badger Hexastitch, and or Abhanga.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #Tanka Prose, #micropoetry, #renga, #solo-renga, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #Gogyohka, #BadgerHexastitch, #Abhanga

JOIN US for the Sue Vincent Classic Rodeo, to celebrate one of our own poets on carrotranch.com. For this rodeo, Carrot Ranch is offering a $100 grand prize. Five runners up will each receive one paperback from Sue Vincent’s collection of published books (those who live in a region where the paperback is unavailable may receive an e-book instead).

POETS read the rules carefully. Use your syllable counters. ❤

No fee necessary to enter but this is a fundraiser so we kindly ask for a suggested donation of $5 per entry (no more than two entries allowed per writer). The contest will close at midnight on Friday, February 19th, 2021. Winning entries will be announced and read at CarrotRanch.com/blog on March 22, 2021.

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


TANKA TUESDAY POETRY CHALLENGE STARS | Synonyms Only “Past & Present” challenge no. 210

This week Word Crafters, I gave you two words: past and present. I asked you to choose synonyms and write your own poetry! Your creativity has reached new levels! You all wrote amazing poetry!

Here’s everyone who joined in:

1.Padre9.Zander17.Ruth Scribbles
2.willowdot2110.Cheryl18.Donna Matthews
3.Trent McDonald11.Jude19.Sue Vincent
4.Dave Madden12.anita dawes20.theindieshe
5.Tina Stewart Brakebill13.s. s.21.kittysverses
6.Myrna at myforever14.Jules22.Kerfe Roig
7.Ritu Bhathal15.Laura McHarrie23.
8.Eugenia16.The Versesmith  

I have a few special mentions to share:

Jude and Aishwarya collaborated on a garland cinquain! This was a fun and creative exercise. The history of Renga poetry was a collaborative effort as well. Check out Jude’s post. He’s looking for collaborators!

S. S. at Mindfills created a Badger Hexastitch that I thought was excellent. Notice how the word before repeats. I feel the repetition leaves you with the feeling of “past and present,” but with deeper meaning.

Zander created a spectacular tanka trio. This is a must read filled with hidden meanings and innuendo.

Aishwarya from Kitty’s Verses created a six stanza tanka chain. She split the first three stanzas to discuss the past and the last three to describe the present.

I’ve been meaning to share with you, the breathtaking poem written by Amanda Gorman, for the Biden/Harris inauguration. She is the youngest inaugural poet in U.S. history, as well as an award-winning writer and cum laude graduate of Harvard University, where she studied Sociology. She has written for the New York Times and has three books forthcoming with Penguin Random House. (theAmandaGorman.com)

Poetry is everywhere! Embrace it, and Write it!

Amanda Gorman: Popsugar.com

“The Hill We Climb” by Amanda Gorman 

For Biden/Harris Inauguration 1/20/2021

When day comes we ask ourselves where can we find light in this never-ending shade,

The loss we carry a sea we must wade. 

We have braved the belly of the beast.

We have learned that quiet isn’t always peace,

And the norms and notions of what just is isn’t always justice.

And yet, the dawn is hours before we knew it.

Somehow we do it.

Somehow we have weathered and witnessed a nation that isn’t broken but simply unfinished.

We, the successors of a country in a time where a skinny black girl descended from slaves

And raised by a single mother can dream of becoming president, 

Only to find herself reciting for one.

And yes, we are far from polished, far from pristine

But that doesn’t mean we are striving to form a union that is perfect.

We are striving to forge our union with purpose,

To compose a country committed to all cultures, colors, characters and conditions of man.

And so we lift our gazes, not to what stands between us, but what stands before us.

We close the divide because we know to put our future first

We must first put our differences aside.

We lay down our arms so we can reach out our arms to one another.

We seek harm to none and harmony for all.

Let the globe, if nothing else, say this is true,

That even as we grieved, we grew.

That even as we hurt, we hoped. 

That even as we tired, we tried that we will forever be tied together. 

Victorious! 

Not because we will never again know defeat, but because we will never again sow division. 

Scripture tells us to envision that everyone shall sit under their own vine and fig tree,

And no one shall make them afraid. 

If we are to live up to our own time, then victory won’t lighten in the blade, 

But in all of the bridges we have made. 

That is the promise to glade, the hill be climbed. 

If only we dare it because being American is more than a pride we inherit. 

It is the past we step into and how we repair it. 

We have seen a force that would shatter our nation rather than share it,

Would destroy our country if it meant delaying democracy. 

And this effort very nearly succeeded. 

But while democracy can be periodically delayed, 

It can never be permanently defeated. 

In this truth, in this faith we trust. 

For while we had our eyes on the future, history has its eyes on us. 

This is the era of just redemption. We feared it at its inception. 

We did not feel prepared to be the heirs of such a terrifying hour, 

But within it, we found the power to author a new chapter.

To offer hope and laughter to ourselves. 

So, while once we asked how could we possibly prevail over catastrophe, 

Now we assert, how could catastrophe possibly prevail over us? 

We will not march back to what was, but move to what shall be. 

A country that is bruised, but whole. Benevolent, but bold. Fierce and free. 

We will not be turned around or interrupted by intimidation, 

Because we know our inaction and inertia will be the inheritance of the next generation. 

Our blunders become their burdens. 

But one thing is certain, if we merge mercy with might and might with the right,

Then love becomes our legacy and change our children’s birthright. 

So let us leave behind the country better than the one we were left,

With every breath in my bronze-pounded chest, 

We will raise this wounded world into a wondrous one.

We will rise from the gold-limbed hills of the west. 

We will rise from the windswept northeast where our forefathers first realized revolution. 

We will rise from the lake rimmed cities of midwestern states. 

We will rise from the sunbaked south. 

We will rebuild, reconcile, and recover in every known nook of our nation

And every corner called our country. 

Our people diverse and beautiful will emerge battered and beautiful. 

When day comes, we step out of the shade aflame and unafraid. 

A new dawn looms as we free it,

For there is always light, if only we are brave enough to see it, 

If only we are brave enough to be it.

©2021 Amanda Gorman

Don’t forget to join us for a special rodeo event to honor one of our own poets, Sue Vincent. Be sure to check out carrotranch.com today for a chance to win $100.00 and one of Sue’s books!

No fee necessary to enter, but this is a fundraiser, so we kindly ask for a suggested donation of $5 per entry (no more than two entries allowed per writer). The contest will close at midnight on Friday, February 19th, 2021. Winning entries will be announced and read at CarrotRanch.com/blog on March 22, 2021. Top entries published at Carrot Ranch. We will not accept entries previously published (even if published on your own blog), so keep them tucked away for now.

See you tomorrow for a new challenge!

Spirit Invasion. A garland cinquain collaboration

Jude shares a layer to our challenge: He asks for Cinquain Collaborators! How cool is that?

tales told different

There was a time we did not believe.
When mist was merely moisture,
And the distant rumble in the night,
Was but thunder from afar.
There was a time all shadows were bound to objects.
Shaped by light,
Afraid of darkness.

That time is no more.
Now we have seen
Now we have felt
And now we are aware
But so are they!

Ice cold
Back and forth those,
eyes hastily juggle
Cries of flocking bats, cut through pained-
silence!

Nameless
They prowl lost caves
Tunneling beneath us
And the earth rumbles in disgust
Befouled

Murmurs
defiant, that
swarm from quarters unknown.
Beyond the grey mountains rustle
Up wind

The veil
Nature’s facade
Ripped from valley to peak
Evil catching the scent of good!
Thirsting

Beware
The changing winds
Things, more than meets the eye
Red alleyways of serpentine-
darkness

Ice cold
They prowl lost caves
Swarm from quarters unknown

View original post 204 more words

The Sue Vincent Rodeo Classic Begins 2/1/2021 at Carrot Ranch.com

Sue Vincent is one of those special bloggers who inspire people from all around the world with her poetry and writing. Her posts about mythology, ancient ruins, medieval churches, and her daily #midnighthaiku have entertained me for years.

How many of us took part in her #writephoto prompts through the years? I know I have! Sue has been a participant and avid supporter of my Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge from the beginning!

On top of all her writing and prompts, Sue has faithfully supported other bloggers by sharing others’ responses to her 19,000 and counting followers. 

Recently, Sue has faced a new and difficult challenge: lung cancer. You can follow her blog to find out more directly from her. The Covid pandemic has served not only to pose a specific threat to a person with a severe respiratory illness, but it has caused the loss of human connection through self-imposed quarantine. 

Now it’s time for Sue to receive something back from the community she’s been a part of for over a decade. Let’s bring the Rodeo to Sue through her computer by coming together with hearts full of joy.

Join us for the Sue Vincent Rodeo Classic at Carrot Ranch – a contest, parade, and celebration all in one!

There are many ways to take part.

One is to visit the prompt image, “Hidden” at Carrot Ranch.

The prompt image and entry form will go live on Monday, February 1st, 2021.

Enter a flash or a poem by Friday, February 19th, 2021, and you could win either $100 or a copy of one of Sue’s books.

The entry form will allow you to give a small donation to Sue and her family, and a link can be found on the contest page.

The winning entries will be announced at Carrot Ranch.com on March 22nd, 2021. 

If you’re not ready to rodeo, there’s always the “Parade.”

  • Reblog one of Sue’s posts from any of her sites (Daily Echo or France and Vincent) with a comment about why you found it special. These are the kinds of connections that bring us closer as a writing community.
  • Follow her blogs (See the links below).
  • Read one of her books, then leave reviews where you can.

Several people are already gearing up for the parade – so check out other people’s blogs for suggestions. 

Please share the news of this special rodeo with a reblog, tweet, a share to Facebook, or any other way you can help other people connect. 99 word literary art is a fantastic way to celebrate a blogging hero and very deserving person. 

Saddle up, everyone! It’s time for a Carrot Ranch Rodeo to celebrate one of our own! Mark your calendars…

The Sue Vincent Rodeo Classic begins on Monday, February 1st, and it’ll be a TUFF prompt to fit within 99 words. 

See you at the Ranch, buckaroos!

I dug myself out of a Michigan snowdrift to include some other ways to connect to Sue Vincent:

#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 210 #SYNONYMSONLY

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Here are your two words:

PAST & PRESENT

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheat sheet below:

View Cheatsheet

Don’t forget! You can use the Badger Hexastitch form if you want to experiment. I suggested two opposite words for you to find synonyms for. This form is written in 6 lines, with a syllable count of 2/4/6/6/4/2. The form is unrhymed with optional rising and falling end-words, which I think adds an interesting twist. Until I get this added to the cheatsheet, please read my discussion of this form HERE.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

writerlywords.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I’ve been using this site to compose my poems. This site does the hard work for you. (howmanysyllables.com has malicious code on it. DO NOT use)

I don't get it

THE *NEW* RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Renga, Solo Renga, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Badger Hexastitch.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #SoloRenga, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #BadgerHexastitch

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


TANKA TUESDAY POETRY STARS | Poets choice no. 209

Hello from snowy Michigan!

What a tremendous success our first poetry challenge of 2021 was! Bravo to those of you who tried a new form and taught us how to create it! Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.ladyleemanila10.Padre19.Goutam Dutta
2.Trent McDonald11.Zander20.theindieshe
3.Tina Stewart Brakebill12.D. L. Finn21.Vashti Quiroz- Vega
4.Dave Madden13.s. s.22.Marsha Ingrao
5.Jules14.anita dawes23.M J Mallon
6.Ritu Bhathal15.Jude24.Kerfe Roig
7.willowdot2116.Gwen Plano25.Ruth
8.The Versesmith17.Cheryl  
9.Donna Matthews18.kittysverses  

Kerfe Roig’s poem, “Renderings,” using the Badger Hexastitch form caught my attention. This form is syllabic and written in six lines with a 2/4/6/6/4/2 structure. It is unrhymed with optional rising and falling end-words, which I think is an interesting twist.

I re-
turn to the earth
reflected as shadow–
silhouette echoing
the places I
have been

©2021 Kerfe Roig

The optional rising and falling end-words often refer to the intonation or rhythm of speech. I also believe from the examples that the rising and falling end-words often end in “ing,” but not always. (See the second poem below). This is a made up form and sometimes that makes it difficult to understand what the creator intended.

Another explanation for the rising and falling end-words could be simply writing a definite beginning and end where everyone can interpret the meaning, like in the third poem below. Kerfe used a similar interpretation, beginning with “I re-” [return] and ending with “have been.”

Or, the rising and falling end-words could be opposites, like in the first poem below:

"Growing"

Fall down
consider tears--
crawl to where grandpa sits
grab onto grandpa's leg
grin like a fox--
stand up

© Lawrencealot - February 16, 2014
reading,
rooted in mind,
not tasting ripe berries,
the oozing summer scent,
window open,
waiting

~~Phil Wood
First flight,
small granddaughter
visits Grandma with Dad,
Mom, brother and sisters
in soccer play-offs
back home.

--Judi Van Gorder

This is a fun form to experiment with. The syllable count has a pleasant rhythm. This year, Word Crafters, we will have a list of optional forms to choose from, including the twelve forms we’ve been using for the last few years. I’ll add the Badger Hexastitch to that list, which I will publish soon.

See you tomorrow for Tanka Tuesday!

#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 209, #POET’SCHOICE

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Happy New Year of poetry writing! I’ve missed you all! I can’t wait to write poetry again. How about you? We’re still unpacking and trying to get our bearings in this strange unknown land called Michigan. The snow is gently falling and the temperatures are much cooler than Arizona. Our new house will need some work, but we’re thrilled to be here!

Since it’s the first poetry challenge of the new year, Word Crafters, choose your own syllabic poetry form, theme, words, images, etc. It’s up to you!

WAIT…

Are you looking for inspiration for your syllabic poetry? Find an image on Pixabay.com or experiment with “found poetry” to find some inspiration. Another option is to try some magnetic poetry. You still have to count syllables, but it’s like putting together a puzzle! Use this opportunity to try a new form!

The Poet’s Collective features an index of Syllabic Poetry Forms. Check it out!

This challenge is a true poet’s choice! Use any syllabic poetry form that you’d like. As long as there are syllables to count, you’re good to go! Be creative. If your form is something new, teach us how to write it. Have fun!

Don’t forget to add the URL of your published poem in Mr. Linky below.

For this challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet below, and/or any other syllabic form you’d like to try.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

writerlywords.com/syllables/

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Renga, Solo-Renga, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, and Shadorma.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #Tanka Prose, #micropoetry, #renga, #solo-renga, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #Gogyohka

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


#TANKA TUESDAY Weekly #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 209, Last challenge of 2020

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

For the LAST poetry challenge of 2020, I want you to write a poem about hope, using your favorite poetry form (it doesn’t have to be syllabic). Please make these poems inspirational to others.

No negativity and No politics! We’ve all had enough politics to last us another lifetime.

After you’ve written your poem, tell us why the specific form you chose is your favorite. Why does that form resonate with you? If it’s a new form, teach us how to write that specific form.

I’ll stop by and comment throughout the week as time allows. There will be NO recap post on Monday, January 4, 2021. Make sure and visit the other participant’s post through Mr. Linky or from the ping-backs on the challenge post.

Tanka Tuesday will resume on January 18, 2021.

Please sign up below for our weekly newsletter to stay in touch. I’ll see you all in Michigan! (Be aware that my time zone will change. In Michigan, I’ll be posting on Eastern Standard Time).

THE RULES

  • Write a poem about hope, using whatever form you wish. Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL: https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink). You might have to delete your previous entry.
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Find your poetry writing happy place!

By clicking submit, you agree to share your email address with Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry to receive a weekly blog recap of posts. It’s the best way to never miss another poetry challenge post again! Use the unsubscribe link in those emails to opt-out.

NOTE: If you were a previous subscriber, please sign up again.

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


TANKA TUESDAY POETRY CHALLENGE STARS | Theme Challenge: Holiday Traditions ~ Cinquain

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Last I week I challenged all of you to write a holiday themed cinquain poem with a syllable count of 2/4/6/8/2. I’m so happy you shared your holiday traditions with us. Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Padre 9.Jules (flash fiction) 17.Ruth 
2.Jude 10.The Versesmith 18.kittysverses 
3.Ritu Bhathal 11.Kat 19.Kerfe Roig 
4.theindieshe 12.Merril D. Smith 20.S. Anne Davis 
5.Trent McDonald 13.Eugenia 21.Annette Rochelle Aben 
6.willowdot21 14.Chel Owens 22.Colleen Chesebro 
7.Cheryl 15.Goutam Dutta 23.Reena Saxena
8.myforever 16.s..  24. Sarah Brentyn

However, in my mind’s eye, I envisioned each of our cinquain poems strung together like a garland wrapped around our “poet-tree.” I’ve added your cinquain poems below, flowing in a visual garland from left to right. I’ve only added one of your cinquain poems, so please visit the links to the blogs to read the other poetic surprises not included. ❤

Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry’s POET TREE

Now, close your eyes and imagine a garland made from our cinquain poems (and a few other kinds of poetry) wrapping around the tree.

Yuletide—
the longest night
of celestial darkness
brings us the return of sunshine— 
balanced

©2020 Colleen
Little
Loving tokens 
Not presents expensive
No gold or incense from three kings
Love gifts

©2020 Padre
Christmas
Each one, teach one
Share skills, ask a question
Many cooks, yet better dishes
Bonded

©2020 Jude
Music
Handmade glass bulbs
Ancient songs about birth
Cheap ornaments bought in childhood
Gingerbread

©2020 Trent
Christmas  
Family time  
Festive sharing of love  
Presents given, food all eaten  
Christmas  

©2020 Ritu
Christmas
Memories to
Hand down, decorating
The hearth and tree, cosy, cooking.
Sleepy.

©2020 Willow
Morning
Early risers
Children forage stockings
Moms and dads still faking sleeping
Joyful

©2020 Cheryl
Back then
Stockings were hung
By the chimney with care
I loved them more than all the gifts
Wrapped
 
 ©2020 Lisa
darkest
night of winter
fair planets kiss, glowing
age of Aquarius dawning
solstice

©2020 kat
Listen
to the laughter,
chocolate-chased giggling and
bageled love feasts. Sweet echoes that
linger

©2020 Merril
noel
beyond joyful
sleigh bells jingle jangle
snow flakes fluttering to and fro
Christmas

©2020 Eugenia
Still, still
Sweet, silent night
Whispered stable story
Glad tidings sung of hist’ry writ
Baby

©2020 Chel
Festival  
Multi-Cultural, Global  
Merrymaking, revelry, bonding  
Inducing sense of hope  
Commemoration 

©2020 Goutam
at last
finding herself
completely unprepared
gobsmacked under a mistletoe
first kiss

©2020 mindfills of s.s.
turkey
chutney dressing
children open presents
giving smiling laughing hugging
kinfolk

©2020 Ruth
Carols,
Decorations,
Winter magic sets in,
Santa Claus is coming to town*,
Christmas.

©2020 Aishwara (Kitty's Verses)
cookies
tree lights sparkling
music and kitchen cheer
exchanging gifts of Love Actu
ally

©2020 Kerfe
Cookies
Frosting fingers
Rolling the memories
Forming shapes of childhood
Baked love

©2020 Ann
Sis makes mincemeat pies
Father sends brother fruit cakes
My hips keep growing

©2020 Annette Rochelle Aben
painting
colors of love
on food plates and presents
I watch Christmas trees turn green with
envy

©2020 Reena
Lucky
To have other
Poets and storytellers
To explore seasonal greetings
Hurrah!

©2020 Jules
Winter
Snowflakes drifting
Darkness descends softly
Emerging sunlight proffers hope
Rebirth

©2020 Sarah

Thanks for being my poetry stars! See you tomorrow for the last challenge of the year!

#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 208, #THEMEPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Image by Biljana Jovanovic from Pixabay
This weeks theme is:

“Holiday Traditions”

What is tradition? By definition, tradition is:

  • The passing down of elements of a culture from generation to generation, especially by oral communication.
  • A mode of thought or behavior followed by a people continuously from generation to generation; a custom or usage.

We all celebrate different holiday traditions at this time of year. And, to be exact, there are many religious traditions that fall under these holiday traditions—not just Christmas.

I consider all of you to be part of my poetic family, so let’s create a huge collaborative garland cinquain (2/4/6/8/2) sequence of poetry that connects to each other like a garland of poetry wrapped around a holiday tree.

This week, write one cinquain based on your holiday traditions. I don’t want anyone bored this holiday week.

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

The RULES

  • If you don’t want to write a cinquain for our garland, write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Renga, Solo-Renga, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, and Shadorma.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #Renga, #Solo-Renga, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma #Gogyohka, #TankaProse

Now, have fun and write some holiday poetry!


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