#TankaTuesday Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 323, 6/6/2023

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

短歌 火曜日

In case you missed last week’s poetry, here are the poet’s links from the May 30, 2023 Spirit Animal Syllabic Poetry challenge:

1.Reena Saxena13.Cheryl25.Roberta Writes
2.Padre14.Luanne Castle26.Marje @ Kyrosmagica
3.willowdot2115.AJ (Ange)27.Kerfe
4.ladyleemanila16.D. L. Finn28.Colleen Chesebro
5.ben Alexander17.Sally29.Merril D. Smith
6.Trent18.Gwen Plano30.Selma
7.Cressida19.Balroop Singh31.Annette Rochelle Aben
8.Paula Light20.Britta Benson32.Ruth Klein
9.Mark Bozeman21.Yvette M Calleiro33.Lesley Scoble
10.sillyfrog22.Chu on This34.Melissa Lemay
11.Jules Corrected Link23.Angela @Life Poetic35.Brenda Marie Fluharty
12.willowdot2124.Li/ Lisa36.You’re next!

This week’s challenge is 🌈 Color poetry. Let’s work with the color of your choice in a syllabic poem. FOLLOW the instructions below:

You don’t have to write about “magic.” I found this magical color chart on Pinterest and thought it would help to inspire us in creating a piece of poetry.


Instructions:

  1. From the chart: choose a color and use the color in your syllabic poem.
  2. Also: Choose ONE word from the descriptions under the color you chose, and add it to your syllabic poem.
  3. Remember, if you write a freestyle poem, please include a syllabic form along with it.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

traveldailylife.com/syllables 

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry


Please include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).

Copy your link into the Mr. Linky written in green script below:

Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

NOTE: If you are reading this post from the WP READER, Mr. Linky will not show on the post. Please go directly to the post on wordcraftpoetry.com to add your post link.

(I solved the issue with WP comments. I deleted the JetPack app off my phone. Comments were getting hung up in there! Now, I only answer comments when I’m on my computer).

Mr. Linky:

Now, have fun and write some syllabic poetry!


Related Posts:

Meet the Poet: Trent McDonald

Welcome to Meet the Poet, a Word Craft Poetry feature written to introduce you to the poets in our writing community.

This is a way to get to know more about the poets and their work. Many of our poets have written both fiction and non-fiction and published and self-published their works.

Some of our poets are also artists, crafting their magic through watercolors or other artistic means along with the written word. There are even a few musicians in our poetic community!

Self Portrait in Color Pencils – Trent P. McDonald

Our guest this month is Trent McDonald. He takes photographs (he took the owl image above), draws, paints, writes fiction and poetry, composes music, and he sings!

Trent

Now who is this Trent P. McDonald guy?

If “Computer Nerd” is a real occupation then we must consider Trent’s “day job” as just that.  His official title is currently “Systems Administrator” but he has worked in various aspects of computer science and IT over the years, including programing, web page design, support, mail administrator, networking, etc., etc.

When he’s not plugging away at computers Trent spends his time enjoying and participating in the arts.  Music is in many ways the love of Trent’s life.  He plays the trumpet and keyboards, composing much of his own music.  The visual arts are also important to him.  He draws, paints and is an avid photographer.  Music might be the love of Trent’s life but writing has been the core: living = thinking = writing.  Trent has spent a good deal of time and energy getting his words down on paper, or the electrons on the screen.

Originally from Ohio Trent lives in New Hampshire, although Massachusetts has become something of a second home.  To be more specific, a small house near the shore of Swan Pond in Dennisport, MA.  He enjoys many outdoor activities, particularly kayaking, hiking, bicycling and skiing.

Always remember that Trent, who likes to refer to himself in the third person when writing bio-sketches, often pretends to have a sense of humor…

trentsworld.blog

Hi, Colleen. Thanks so much for inviting me over for a chat. I think I am different than most of the people who participate in “Tanka Tuesday”. I started playing a musical instrument not too long after I began to write. In my college years I started to write “pure” music, i.e., no words. But at that same time I began to write fiction.

Poetry?

Kind of funny, my mom is a locally known poet and has even had some of her poems set to music by an internationally known composer (H. Leslie Adams), and yet I didn’t write poetry.

OK, in the early 2000s I spent a decade composing “classical” music and wrote a few poems for art songs.  “Black-eyed Susan”, which I recently posted on Youtube:

This is a good example, but I still wasn’t into poetry, at least as far as creating it went.  I felt clumsy when I attempted.

In the 2010s I went full bore with writing fiction.

And that is when I started to write poems.

Since then I have written hundreds of poems, perhaps over a thousand, and have even started to put poetry and music together.  That’s called a “song”…

👩🏻‍🦳 Trent, how does writing syllabic poetry enhance your life, or your writing practice?

I began writing poetry as an extension of my fiction.  Poetry brings a lot of good things into practice that can then be transferred.  There are, of course, those things like imagery, symbolism, metaphor and simile that are the bedrock of poetry.  There is the economy of words.

Which leads us to syllabic poetry.  

It is distilling poetry down to the bones, though, of course, there are longer forms.  The thing is, although word choice is always very important to poetry, it is the key to syllabic poetry.  

Taking time to choose the right word, and thinking about words, has helped when I write fiction.

And songs.

And beyond that, “Tanka Tuesday” has challenged me to do it on the spot – I typically do it in a 5 minute break from work.

I have written several songs on the spot, in less than five minutes.  I will be recording an instrumental and decide it needs words.  I write the words, press record, and…

Two very recent examples (my last and third to last songs) are “Waiting for the Fall.”

“Minor Stirrings” came next:

Both were written as instrumental pieces to demonstrate a sound, and then I decided I needed words.  The meaning of both of these, particularly “Waiting for the Fall”, are very much up for interpretation.

👩🏻‍🦳 Trent these songs have a “Pink Floyd” quality to them. I really like the sound. So, how important is the accessibility of your poem’s meaning? Should one have to work hard to “solve” the poem?

I often write very straightforward poems.  I also try to write poems that are very difficult.  To me, if every person has a totally different interpretation, then the poem succeeded.  

The same is true for my music.  Some are very straight forward, some less so.  Musically, I love to write things that are very complicated but sound easy – strange chord progressions, odd time signatures, etc., that sound like simple, straight forward music.

My song “Silver Bells Plays on the Radio” is actually in five-four – a very unusual time signature for popular music!  Has there ever been a Christmas song in five-four?  But would you ever know listening to it?  It sounds natural, if somewhat dark.

The same goes for the lyrics.  Often, if I am writing off the cuff to fit the music, it is super simple. When I spend time writing the lyrics, I do try to go deeper and have it open for interpretation.

I think a good example is “She Talks Each Night to Ariel.” “Ariel” here is a reference to a moon of Uranus.

Maybe.

I refer to it as a moon several times during the introduction and first verse.  For example, “From their ice-world sky-god home”(references to Uranus) and, “But she talks each night to Ariel, That moon so small and far” (i.e., Ariel).

But actually “Ariel” is a person’s inner creativity, their imagination.  The entire song is really a “love song” to all of those Geeks out there.  A peon to creativity.

A love song that, like most songs, is written with all of those things that poetry gives us that I mentioned earlier.

👩🏻‍🦳 Trent it seems that many people believe poetry is dying. Do you agree or disagree with this statement, and why?

I know many “poetry purists” do not like the poetry of the day.  Hasn’t that always been the case?  And yet, poetry is there, making us think.  Just this week the poet Amanda Gorman was in the news because some saw in her words of love for every one of us ideas of hatred towards racists and fascists.  Many of us listened once again to the words spoken on that February day two years ago.  It still resonates for some of us, as it angers others.

And it isn’t just on that large stage, but everywhere, including social media.

It is funny, I didn’t realize how many people wrote poetry until I started blogging.  Suddenly it seemed that everyone in the world was a closet poet.

And, yes, that is also when I started to write more poetry.  

So I don’t see it dying, I see it spreading.

And, of course, there will always be the combination of music and word called “song”.  

In a little over a year, I have posted nine songs with lyrics that I wrote.  Over the ten previous years I posted only two original songs plus three “cover songs” and one spoof of a Beatles song.  Yes, of 87 songs on Youtube, only 15 are songs, and 9 were posted just this last year.  So, for me at least, there are more and more songs, i.e., poems set to music, being put out there.

Poetry is not dead…

A last thought.  Although we often just say mundane things, I think a lot of us poets do try to express bigger ideas.  A poem is great for that!  You can use few words to say many things.  When I take time to write words for my songs, I do try to put meaning.  The longer I spend, the more meaning.  Look at the Ariel song above.  

Another example is “I’m Still Here.” It is not profound, It is not really challenging. But it is an idea I want to express – no matter what, thick or thin, if I am needed, reach a hand out for I’m still here.

👩🏻‍🦳 Trent, I’m so inspired by your poetry and lyrics. Thanks so much for sharing how poetry and music compliment each other. 🌹

Thanks, Colleen. I hope you enjoyed this little chat and some of my music.


Looking for a New Read?

Click the book to find it on Amazon.com

A stench lies on Avebury, New Hampshire. It isn’t something that one can smell, it is more of a psychic soot polluting everybody’s mood. No one recalls when it arrived, but there does seem to be a connection with the Old Mill and its mysterious new owners. Following the trail of the local legend, the ghost of Martha Goode, Gill Baxter is driven to discover the truth behind the events of 1821 and, hopefully, prevent another “time of dying.” That trail, though, leads directly to The Old Mill.


Here’s How to Connect with Trent:

Trent’s World the Blog

YouTube

Thanks for stopping by to meet Trent. See you next time, for another opportunity to Meet the Poet!

Happy Sunday!

The last two weeks with WordPress have been trying! The recent updates caused many issues for my sites. However, I believe I have everything under control. Finally…

One big issue was the “Classic” themes. For whatever reason, they quit working correctly. I don’t know why, I can’t explain it. I think the last WP update changed the blocks significantly, and the classic themes are having a hard time recognizing the changes. If you’re having trouble with WordPress, here are a few things I learned this week.

  1. Change your theme. Go to Appearance/Themes/. In the search box, select Feature: View All. Then, select “Hybrid themes.” These themes were built specifically for the block editor. They still use the customizer, in most cases.
  2. The minute (I’m not kidding) I switched my themes, everything on my blogs calmed down and fell into place. I’m using Hever on Word Craft Poetry, and my author blog. On Unicorn Cats Publishing Services, I’m using Morden.
  3. Explore what you can do with your pages. WordPress now offers several block patterns you can use to customize a front home page for your site. (I’ve redone mine! Check it out!) Click the + on a page and browse all the blocks. Then, choose patterns and see what you can create! I’m very pleased with the results.
  4. Widgets are found at the bottom of these hybrid themes. They are not as conspicuous, as they once were. I like the clean look of the pages and posts. Our poetry and writing are front and center now.
  5. Another thing I really like is the option to change the background colors. What’s really great is that color populates to the post or page when you’re creating and writing. No more eye strain!
  6. These hybrid themes are much better now than when they first premiered. If you tried them before but didn’t like the look, try them again. You might be pleasantly surprised.

LAST DAY: Around the Campfire Literary Journal Submissions

Have you submitted??? Submissions are due by midnight 5/31/2023

🔥 You can submit three (3) entries. The title does not count in the word count.

99 Word Stories, 99 word freestyle poetry, 99 Word BOTS & Memoir, Double Ennead (99 Syllable poetry) 🔥

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

Around the Campfire is a bi-annual publication of quality fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, and poetry in the specific styles of 99 words or 99 syllables (Double Ennead).

The literary journal is published in partnership between Gitty Up Press and Unicorn Cats Publishing Services.

2023 is the first issue. The debut theme is 🔥 “fire.” 🔥

The estimated publishing date is October, 2023.

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Open to all writers.
  2. Must be 99 words or 99 syllables (see list above).
  3. Must include the theme “fire.”
  4. Must be original and not published elsewhere (including personal blogs or social media).
  5. Accepted May 1 through May 31, 2023, ending at midnight.
  6. Writers may submit up to three entries of one style or a mixture.
  7. Submit all of your submissions (up to three) at one time in the body of a single email. Do not send attachments.
  8. Submissions are only accepted at: campfirejournal@gmail.com. Include the submission in the body of the email.
  9. All submissions will receive a notification of receipt. Not all submissions will be selected. 
  10. Terms of publishing are provided upon acceptance. 

When it comes to word count, writing programs can count differently. There’s some that count certain punctuation, such as the em dash, and others that count hyphenated words as one. 

Therefore, we recommend using Microsoft Word or WordCounter.

The same is true about syllable counters. For syllables, use Syllable Counter.

Submit by May 31, 2023 at midnight EST

I’m waiting to hear from you!

#TankaTuesday Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 322, 5/30/2023: Spirit Animal Poetry

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

短歌 火曜日

In case you missed last week’s poetry, here are the poet’s links from the 5/23/23 Syllabic Acrostic Poetry challenge:

1.Melissa Lemay14.Ange (AJ)27.willowdot21
2.Anita Dawes15.Gwen Plano28.Cheryl
3.ben Alexander16.Chu on This29.Christine
4.Reena Saxena17.Jules Corrected Link30.Smitha Vishwanath
5.Luanne Castle18.Pankaj Kumar31.Mark Bozeman
6.Cressida19.Sally32.Sadje
7.Sangeetha20.Echoes of the soul33.Colleen Chesebro
8.Jules21.Destiny34.The Versesmith
9.Li/ Lisa22.Balroop Singh35.Ange
10.Cheryl23.Selma36.E.A. Colquitt
11.Yvette M Calleiro24.Kerfe (correct link)37.You’re next!
12.willowdot2125.Merril  
13.Paula Light26.willowdot21  

This week’s challenge is to find your Spirit Animal. Take the quiz below ⤵️

Q U I Z

Then, write a syllabic poem about this animal.

Remember, if you write freestyle poetry, you must include a syllabic form.


Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

traveldailylife.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry


Please include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).

Copy your link into the Mr. Linky written in green script below:

Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

NOTE: If you are reading this post from the WP READER, Mr. Linky will not show on the post. Please go directly to the post on wordcraftpoetry.com to add your post link.

I’m having trouble receiving comments. If you don’t hear from me email me at: tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com.

Mr Linky:

Now, have fun and write some syllabic poetry!


Meet the Poet: Emily Gmitter & Zoe, the Fabulous Feline 🐈‍⬛

Welcome to Meet the Poet, a Word Craft Poetry feature written to introduce you to the poets in our writing community. This is a way to get to know more about the poets and their work. Many of our poets have written both fiction and non-fiction and published and self-published their works.

Some of our poets are also artists, crafting their magic through watercolors or other artistic means along with the written word. There are even a few musicians in our poetic community!

Did you know we even have a cat poet? Grab a cup of tea or coffee, and meet Zoe, the fabulous feline CAT poet!

Our guest today is Emily Gmitter & Zoe

Emily lives on the North Shore of Massachusetts. She loves to spend alone-time at the beach,

fun-time singing at local karaoke clubs, and the rest of her time engaged in activities with family

and friends … when she’s not reading, writing, or painting.

Amazon.com
Zoe: chillin’

Hi, Colleen. Zoe and I are so excited to stop by and talk about poetry and our newest book, “Happiness is a Warm Cat.”

👩🏻‍🦳 Thanks so much for stopping by Emily and Zoe. Chloe & Sophie were excited when I told them I would be featuring a cat poet. Now, they want to write cat poetry!

So tell me, Emily and Zoe, how important is the accessibility of your poem’s meaning? Do you think your reader should have to work hard to “solve” the poem?

🐈‍⬛ Meoooowieno! (That is felinese for “Goodness, no!”) Now, to answer the question. In my opinion, the reader should not have to work hard when pondering a poem’s meaning. Please note I did not say “in my humble opinion” because my opinions are never humble. But I’m going to let Emily take it from here. I’m on my way out to get her a present because she was a minor help in writing my book. I’ll be right back. 🐈‍⬛

Zoe, at the computer…

With my thanks and all due respect to my feline friend … I beg to differ a bit with Zoe’s response on a poem’s accessibility. Writing is creative, and we have to go where our creative impulses lead us. And sometimes that may be to a place where depth of thought serves the poem better than the directness of language. So, in my humble opinion, there is room in our world for both types of poetry. The accessible poem and the more mysterious poem—one which utilizes, for example, metaphors and obscure language that require the reader to put extra thought into deciphering the poet’s words.

We poets write from a place deep within ourselves, from our hearts. It’s a wonderful and gratifying gift to entertain someone with our poems. And if a reader has to put in some additional effort to understand a poem’s deeper meaning, so much the better. For then the poem has done what good poetry should do: It has engaged the reader. It has drawn them into our creative efforts and enabled them to share the joy, grief, passion, and/or mystery of which we write. If they “get it” on the first reading, that’s great, but if they don’t, perhaps they will give the poem another read and come to understand what the poet was trying to convey. If a reader never gets it, that’s okay, too; at the very least, we’ve given them a glimpse into our souls.

👩🏻‍🦳 Emily, I’ve read that many people believe poetry is dying. Do you agree or disagree with this statement, and why?

I heartily disagree with that supposition. Of course, poetry is not dying, as evidenced by the thousands of books of poetry that are published every year, just here in the United States. And that is not counting other forums for poets, such as poetry periodicals and poetry readings. As poets, we also know that many unpublished poems exist as well—all the lonely poems that are created every day but never published.

Zoe has returned and wants to chime in. So I guess I’ll let her.

Zoe

🐈‍⬛ I agree with Emily. Poetry is alive and well in my world, as well as around the world. I fancy myself a poet of sorts, having written a few funny poems and a few love poems. Speaking of love… being the wise cat that I am, I have used poetry in my stories to express that, whether feline, canine, or human, love is all we need. Okay, I know John Lennon said that first. But it’s true. Love really is all we need to achieve inner peace and to co-exist in harmony with one another. 🐈‍⬛

Zoe says “Hi!”

👩🏻‍🦳 Emily, I’ve been following you for a long time on Facebook. I know you use other mediums, such as photography or artwork in your poetry. What message do you want your readers to receive from this kind of collaborative effort?

Emily here: I’ve created a variety of artwork that has been incorporated into the book. I painted and sketched these works over several years, and independently of my writings.

As I was compiling the written material for the book, I realized I had several pieces of art that correlated either directly or indirectly with a particular poem (or story). I had inadvertently put my poetry on canvas.

Emily paints fairies on rocks! 🧚‍♀️

Truly, the only message in that collaboration is a simple one: I hope my readers will enjoy my art as well as my words. On a deeper level, I believe in cosmic connections, so, I would add that, when serendipity rears its pretty head, pay attention. The Universe may be trying to tell you something.

👩🏻‍🦳 I love that statement where you figured out that you paint with words! I love your artwork! Emily, would you like to share something about yourself that your readers don’t know (yet)?

🐈‍⬛ Hi! It’s me Zoe, again. I’ll take this one. When I bring Emily a dead bird, I order it from Amazon. 🐈‍⬛

👩🏻‍🦳 There you have it… everything you wanted to know about erm… about Zoe! “Happiness is a Warm Cat” is available on Amazon now.

In Happiness is a Warm Cat, author Emily Gmitter and her feline friend, Zoe, serve up a mixed genre of short stories and poems brimming with passion, love, and humor. The majority of the stories are told from the perspective of her cat, Zoe—a cool cat of perspicacity if ever there was one. Zoe’s stories will make you laugh, cry, and occasionally scratch your head in wonder, while Emily’s stories of fiction and nonfiction mingle humor with a sharp poignancy that you’ll find both heartwarming and entertaining.

AMAZON LINK

Here’s a poem written by The Fabulous Feline Zoe!

Zoe, the feline, checking in, 
To bring you a laugh, a tear, or a grin. 
The stories I give you, they come from within. 
Except when they come from without.

© Zoe Gmitter (The Fabulous Feline) 🐈‍⬛

© Gmitter, Emily. Happiness Is A Warm Cat (pp. 109-110). Kindle Edition.

Here’s Where to Find Emily & Zoe

BLOG: The Life and Times of Zoe, the Fabulous Feline

Facebook Page: Zoe Gmitter

Thanks for stopping by to meet Emily & Zoe. Chloe & Sophie can’t wait to see you again!

Chloe & Sophie 🐾

Please note: With all the WordPress issues I’ve been having… Emily has been replying to comments, but they aren’t showing up. I’m not sure what is going on. Thanks. I’ll contact WP later this afternoon.

Around the Campfire Literary Journal-DEADLINE 5/31/2023

Have you submitted??? There’s 5 days left!

🔥 You can submit three (3) entries. The title does not count in the word count.

99 Word Stories, 99 word freestyle poetry, 99 Word BOTS & Memoir, Double Ennead (99 Syllable poetry) 🔥

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

Around the Campfire is a bi-annual publication of quality fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, and poetry in the specific styles of 99 words or 99 syllables (Double Ennead).

The literary journal is published in partnership between Gitty Up Press and Unicorn Cats Publishing Services.

2023 is the first issue. The debut theme is 🔥 “fire.” 🔥

The estimated publishing date is October, 2023.

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Open to all writers.
  2. Must be 99 words or 99 syllables (see list above).
  3. Must include the theme “fire.”
  4. Must be original and not published elsewhere (including personal blogs or social media).
  5. Accepted May 1 through May 31, 2023, ending at midnight.
  6. Writers may submit up to three entries of one style or a mixture.
  7. Submit all of your submissions (up to three) at one time in the body of a single email. Do not send attachments.
  8. Submissions are only accepted at: campfirejournal@gmail.com. Include the submission in the body of the email.
  9. All submissions will receive a notification of receipt. Not all submissions will be selected. 
  10. Terms of publishing are provided upon acceptance. 

When it comes to word count, writing programs can count differently. There’s some that count certain punctuation, such as the em dash, and others that count hyphenated words as one. 

Therefore, we recommend using Microsoft Word or WordCounter.

The same is true about syllable counters. For syllables, use Syllable Counter.

Submit by May 31, 2023 at midnight EST

I’m waiting to hear from you!

#TankaTuesday Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 321, 5/23/23

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

短歌 火曜日

Tanka Tuesday Specific Form Prompt: colorful blocks spell: specific

In case you missed last week’s poetry, here are the poet’s links from the 5/15/23 Synonyms Only challenge (Work & Play):

1.ben Alexander 10.Padre 19.Mrityunjay Dixit (Jay) 
2.willowdot21 11.Chu On This 20.Luanne Castle 
3.Selma 12.Jules 21.Cheryl 
4.AJ 13.Annette Rochelle Aben 22.Colleen Chesebro 
5.Mark Bozeman 14.Gwen Plano 23.Paula Light 
6.ladyleemanila 15.Li/ Lisa 24.Roberta Writes 
7.Cheryl Batavia 16.Balroop Singh 25.Marsha Ingrao 
8.Reena Saxena 17.Yvette M Calleiro 26.Ruth Klein 
9.Cressida 18.Melissa Lemay 27.You’re next!

I had so much fun writing an Acrostic poem for David’s Wea’ve Written Weekly W3 Prompt HERE.

So, I started thinking about how we could write an acrostic syllabic poem. I knew if we had enough syllables, it could work.

This week’s challenge is to write a specific form with a twist!

Write an acrostic poem with a syllable count of 8, 9, or 10 syllables per line (all the same, or a mixture of syllable counts, is fine).

HOW to WRITE an ACROSTIC poem

Acrostic poems are poems in which a word or several words are spelled out vertically. This is usually the first letter of each line.

EXAMPLE:

M E D I T A T I O N

Mental images flow like waves on the sea
Engage your breath—in and out, soft and slow
De-stress, let go, just be
Imagine the nothingness, breath…
Take time to focus on your love and kindness
Accept any thoughts and let them go
Trust the process, you’re a star in the sky
Imagine breathing relaxation into your body
Open your third eye
No judgement—just breathe, just be

🙏🏻 Namaste 🙏🏻

This is the poem I wrote for David’s challenge. Here is the syllable count to give you an idea. A syllable count of 8, 9, or 10 syllables per line is totally doable!

syllable count of the Acrostic poem Meditation 10-10-6-8-11-9-10-14-5-7

🦄 Let’s get magical! 🦄

SELECT one of these words to use for your Acrostic poem: (I grabbed these words from a fantasy word website. Yes it should be conjure and specter). I’ve changed the words to reflect the correct spelling. 🤦🏼‍♀️

MAGICAL

CHARM

SPECTER

FANTASY

CONJURE

UNICORN

IMAGINATION

ORACLE

MALEVOLENCE

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

traveldailylife.com/syllables

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry


Please include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).

Copy your link into the Mr. Linky written in green script below:

Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

NOTE: If you are reading this post from the WP READER, Mr. Linky will not show on the post. Please go directly to the post on wordcraftpoetry.com to add your post link.

MR. LINKY:

Now, be magical and write some syllabic acrostic poetry!

Bitmoji: Word Witch Colleen as a Geni: Say No More

Around the Campfire: OPEN for Submissions

Have you submitted???

🔥 You can submit three (3) entries. If you’ve already sent in one entry… why not write two more? 🔥

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

Around the Campfire is a bi-annual publication of quality fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, and poetry in the specific styles of 99 words or 99 syllables (Double Ennead).

The literary journal is published in partnership between Gitty Up Press and Unicorn Cats Publishing Services.

2023 is the first issue. The debut theme is 🔥 “fire.” 🔥

The estimated publishing date is October, 2023.

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Open to all writers.
  2. Must be 99 words or 99 syllables (see list above).
  3. Must include the theme “fire.”
  4. Must be original and not published elsewhere (including personal blogs or social media).
  5. Accepted May 1 through May 31, 2023, ending at midnight.
  6. Writers may submit up to three entries of one style or a mixture.
  7. Submit all of your submissions (up to three) at one time in the body of a single email. Do not send attachments.
  8. Submissions are only accepted at: campfirejournal@gmail.com. Include the submission in the body of the email.
  9. All submissions will receive a notification of receipt. Not all submissions will be selected. 
  10. Terms of publishing are provided upon acceptance. 

When it comes to word count, writing programs can count differently. There’s some that count certain punctuation, such as the em dash, and others that count hyphenated words as one. 

Therefore, we recommend using Microsoft Word or WordCounter.

The same is true about syllable counters. For syllables, use Syllable Counter.

Submit by May 31, 2023 at midnight EST

#TankaTuesday Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 320, 5/15/2023

WELCOME TO #TANKATUESDAY!

短歌 火曜日

In case you missed last week’s poetry, here are the poet’s links from the May 9, 2023 Photo Prompt challenge:

1.willowdot2110.Li/ Lisa19.Gwen Plano
2.ladyleemanila11.Jules20.Luanne Castle
3.ben Alexander12.Cheryl21.Kerfe
4.Reena Saxena13.AJ22.Ruth Klein
5.Britta Benson14.Balroop Singh23.Jaye Marie
6.Mark Bozeman15.Echoes of the soul24.Colleen Chesebro
7.Yvette M Calleiro16.Brenda Marie Fluharty25.Roberta Writes
8.Cressida17.Mrityunjay Dixit (Jay)26.Smitha V.
9.Elizabeth18.Melissa Lemay  

This week’s challenge is Synonyms Only. That means we select synonyms for the two words below. Please use the synonyms in your poem. Let’s work with opposites and see what we can create.

💼 Work & Play 💃🏼

How to Work with Opposites in Poetry

Identify the Opposites: We have two words: “work & play. Select synonyms for the two words. Begin by identifying one word and its opposing counterpart. EX: for work you could use “job.” For play you could select “frolic.”

Then, think about the ways in which the two concepts differ and how they can be used to create contrast in your poem.

Use a Split Format: One way to structure your poem is to divide it into two or three separate stanzas. The first stanza should describe the one word, while the second stanza should describe the opposite word. A third stanza could sum up the connections between the two opposites. Use vivid imagery and sensory language to help bring your poem to life.

Any of the smaller syllabic forms word great for this: cinquain, senryu, shadorma, Abhanga, tanka, Badger’s Hexastich… there are so many more to choose from on the Poets Collective.org: HERE.

Remember… if you write a freestyle poem, please add a syllabic form to go with it.

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

Not sure how to write syllabic poetry? READ THIS FIRST: How to Craft Syllabic Poetry

Tanka Tuesday Cheat Sheet

PoetsCollective.org

traveldailylife.com/syllables The syllable counters are all acting up. Please count your words as best you can!

synonyms.com 

thesaurus.com

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry – The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry


Please include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).

Copy your link into the Mr. Linky written in green script below:

Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

NOTE: If you are reading this post from the WP READER, Mr. Linky will not show on the post. Please go directly to the post on wordcraftpoetry.com to add your post link.

Mr. Linky:

Don’t forget to submit to the first Around the Campfire Literary Journal. Learn more HERE

Now, have fun and write some syllabic poetry!


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