Introducing… Word Weaving—A Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse

For the last month, I’ve teased you on the Tanka Tuesday challenges with some big news coming! Happy May Day!

Word Weaving began as a creative experiment between two poetic friends, Colleen Chesebro and JulesPaige, birthed from our combined love for writing syllabic poetry on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry at wordcraftpoetry.com. Those Tanka Tuesday poetry challenges got us thinking. What if we published a yearly poetry journal of syllabic verse to encourage emerging poets?

Announcing a new Poetry Journal: Word Weaving—A Word Craft Journal of Syllabic of Syllabic verse. Submissions open May 15, 2021. Learn more on wordweavingpoetryjournal.com. Click on “submissions.”

Jules and I are excited to contribute to the writing community. Our aim is to be a small, online, and print poetry journal that shares thoughtful syllabic poetry with uplifting fresh voices while supporting established ones. There are no submission fees. Read our submissions page to learn more.

The proceeds from the sale of this journal will be used to sponsor a yearly poetry contest on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry at wordcraftpoetry.com to be announced in 2022. Prizes will be determined at a later date. We will keep the cost of the ebook and the print book low enough to make it affordable for all poetry lovers.

Submissions open May 15, 2021, when we will announce the theme of the first edition. Sign up for our email below so you don’t miss the date.

Thanks for embarking on this poetic journey with us. We look forward to reading your submissions.

Kindly,

Colleen M. Chesebro & JulesPaige

Please subscribe to our email list so you don’t miss the submission dates or publication dates. It’s the best way to stay in touch!

By clicking submit, you agree to share your email address with the Word Weaving Poetry Journal and MailChimp to receive notice of upcoming submission dates, marketing, and other emails. Use the unsubscribe link in those emails to opt-out at any time.

CONVERSATIONS WITH COLLEEN: MEET THE POET, Jude Itakali

Welcome to an extra feature on Word Craft: Prose & Poetry, which highlights the poets in our writing community. It’s a chance for readers to get to know the people behind the poetry and the books. It’s a great way to share our love for writing poetry with others.

This week I’m thrilled to bring you, Jude Itakali and his first book of poetry! “Crossroads (Winds of Love)” releases May 17, 2021, and is available for pre-order now.

Jude Itakali was born and lives in Kampala, Uganda. He is publishing his first collected works, “CROSSROADS (Winds of love).”

When not being an athlete on the rugby field, or crunching down numbers on a computer for work, he delicately pens the epiphanies from life and its different relationships and encounters.

He writes about all sorts of topics, finding a way to relate them with each other because no one theme exists in a vacuum.

Empathy is sometimes considered a gift, and Jude has it in abundance.

Amazon.com

Jude has taken part in Tanka Tuesday for a few years now. Each week I look forward to his special brand of poetic magic. Welcome, Jude!

Hi, Colleen. Thanks so much for this interview. I’m really looking forward to our chat.

Great! I wanted to ask you a few questions so we could all learn more about you. Here we go! What got you started writing poetry? Why did you stick with it?

I love poetry because of its ability to touch many people, and yet still touch each one in a particular way. I admire the creativity it gives and the outlet for emotions that might otherwise fester within. The ability to exercise the breadth of language to pass on a message has always captivated me because it touches and evokes much deeper than plain direct words.

I write poetry because through it, I can share concerns, happiness, emotions, and awareness in ways that people can read and enjoy freely and openly.

I agree, Jude. We write poetry to connect with others. So, if you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

I’d tell my younger self to stop hoarding his writing and get in touch with people who like reading and writing early enough. Doors would have opened much earlier. Plus to get his writing out there through a blog or site, and read a lot more with the aim of learning, as well as enjoying the read.

How has publishing your first book changed your writing process?

Publishing my first book has not really changed my writing process, but put an emphasis on quality, so that I keep learning, and keep improving in order to curve a niche for myself in the vast array of amazing writers and talent out there.

Thanks, Jude. What is “Crossroads (Winds of Love)” about?

In the corridors of love, at the crossroads of loneliness, we stand at our most vulnerable. As the winds of love swirl, we are often ill-prepared for the portends and promises that they carry. The longing, lust, fear, and deception. But also the hope, renewal, and lessons of love. In this book, may we be strengthened by the memory of things we have survived, soothed with the understanding of perspective, and comforted with the hope of things yet to come.

May these poems, prose and short stories touch each of us in our own particular way.

It sounds like an amazing read, Jude. I’ve added the links below:

Kindle Amazon.com

You can find Jude on his blog, Tales Told Different. Look for his poems. You’ll be glad you did!

Thanks for stopping by to meet Jude. ❤

#TANKA TUESDAY WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 223, #THEMEPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Welcome! Check out the NEW main menu item: Poetry Book Publishing Links to find poetry book publishing links, including links to literary journals and poetry magazines accepting submissions of poetry. If you know of a link to add to this list, let me know by email to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. ❤

It’s the fourth week of the month! Are you ready for a theme prompt? Kat from last month’s challenge picked the theme:

“Pick a Flower” and using one of the syllabic forms we use, tell us why it is special to you.

On the Monday recap, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme.

For this poetry challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the cheat sheet:

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

The RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo-renga, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, and Abhanga. The first of the month challenge, you can write whatever syllabic form you choose, but not this challenge.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the Https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY STARS | #Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt #222

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to write your poetry based off of the photo that Anita Dawes provided using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, and Abhanga poetry. Sorry… I had to edit this post. I was in a hurry and used the wrong format. ❤ I need an administrative assistant! LOL! 😀

Remember… the first of the month you can write any syllabic poetry form of your choice. The rest of the time, we write our syllabic poetry in one of the forms listed, and we follow a schedule (posted below). I do this for a couple of reasons. It requires those of you who would like to enter contests or to submit your poetry to literary journals to learn how to follow their rules. This challenge gives you that practice. Besides, why enter a challenge if you don’t follow the rules? That’s the challenge part. ❤

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.ladyleemanila8.Gwen Plano15.theindieshe
2.Padre9.Jaye Frisina16.Heather
3.Reena Saxena10.anita dawes17.Jude
4.Trent McDonald11.willowdot2118.Sally Cronin
5.Cheryl12.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr19.Ruth E Klein
6.Erlyn Olivia13.Pat20.Colleen Chesebro
7.Jules14.Balroop Singh  

Wow!! Didn’t you think we had some amazing poetry this week? I was totally blown away by Jude’s poem HERE. Check that out. He has discovered some creative ways to combine his love of writing with the syllabic forms. The epistolary format is a great way to showcase your poetry.

Please visit the rest of the poetry… it’s exceptional this week.

I chose to highlight Trent McDonald’s double-nonet this week. He rarely writes this form, but I enjoyed his thoughts prompted by the image. This piece has a great rhythm and flow. The questions at the end are there to make you evaluate your own values toward climate change. Bravo Trent!

This week, I’ve asked Trent McDonald to choose the prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Don’t forget to check out the Tanka Tuesday Book Store. Have you recently published a book with poetry in it? Let me know. I’ll add a link to your Amazon Author Page.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

New RELEASE: “Poetry Treasures”

I’m thrilled to announce the release of “Poetry Treasures,” a collection of poetry from the poet/author guests of Robbie Cheadle on the “Treasuring Poetry” blog series on Writing to be Read in 2020.

Open the book and discover the poetry treasures of Sue Vincent (Author), Geoff Le Pard (Author), Frank Prem (Author), Victoria Zigler (Author), Colleen M. Chesebro (Author), K. Morris (Author), Annette Rochelle Aben (Author), Jude Kirya Itakali (Author), and Roberta Eaton Cheadle (Author). 

This book is also available on Draft2Digital.

Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would find myself in the company of my favorite poets. If you’re not familiar with the blogging collaboration of Kaye Lynn Booth and Robbie Cheadle and more, at Writing to be Read, you will want to check out the opportunities for poets and writers.

Currently, the book is in kindle form. The print version will be available soon.

#TANKA TUESDAY WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 222 #EKPHRASTIC #PHOTOPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Welcome! Check out the main menu item: Poetry Book Publishing Links to find poetry book publishing links, including links to literary journals and poetry magazines accepting submissions of poetry. I update these links (sometimes daily) as I find more publishing opportunities. If you know of a link to add to this list, let me know by email to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. ❤

It’s the third week of the month! Time for an Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

This challenge explores Ekphrastic writing inspired by visual art and/or photographs. Anita Dawes from last month’s challenge has provided the photo for this month’s challenge:

Image by mollyroselee from Pixabay

For the Tanka Tuesday Photo Challenge, write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheat-sheet (click the link below):

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

sodacoffee.com

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and the number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

How Many Syllables

This site counts syllables and helps you find words that rhyme.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using one of these forms: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, Badger Hexastich (hexastich for short), and Abhanga. Don’t forget the Diatelle, which is an optional form found here.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #Solo-Renga, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #Badger Hexastich, #Abhanga, #Diatelle

So, Word Crafters… who wants to have fun and write some poetry?


#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY STARS #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to choose synonyms for the words, “search & lost,” using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo-renga, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich (hexastich for short), and Abhanga.

Remember… the first of the month you can write any syllabic poetry form of your choice. The rest of the time, we write our syllabic poetry in one of the forms listed, and we follow a schedule (posted below). I do this for a couple of reasons. It requires those of you who would like to enter contests or to submit your poetry to literary journals to learn how to follow the rules. This challenge gives you that practice. Besides, why enter a challenge if you don’t follow the rules? That’s the challenging part. ❤

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.D. L. Finn10.The Versesmith19.Dorinda Duclos
2.ladyleemanila11.Jules20.Linda Lee Lyberg
3.Gwen Plano12.Annette Rochelle Aben21.Kerfe Roig
4.Cheryl13.Dr. Crystal Grimes22.M J Mallon
5.theindieshe14.Jude23.anita dawes
6.Laura McHarrie15.Myrna Migala24.Sally Cronin
7.Trent McDonald16.Ritu Bhathal25.Heather
8.willowdot2117.Goutam Dutta26.Colleen Chesebro
9.Erlyn Olivia18.ruthscribbles  

I could not believe all the great poetry this week! It’s been hard keeping up with NaPoWritMo, writing poems, and preparing for the big surprise at the end of the month! One thing is certain… you are all great poets and deserve stars!

Creativity is the name of the game in poetry. Who said you can’t combine some of the American forms with some prose thrown in to make longer poetry? Check out Jude’s poem, “The One thing we must never lose.” He combines shadorma and Abhanga poetry with a bit of prose to make a satisfying longer poem with a great message.

I loved all the creative Etheree poems this week, too. Check out Sally Cronin’s double reversed nonet: “Ageism.” Today (April 18th) is my birthday, so that poem really had me laughing! Thank you, Sally!

It was Ritu’s Etheree, “Search & Lost,” that grabbed my heart this week!

Set
Adrift
In my thoughts
Hunting wildly
Looking for the truth
The answers to my 'Whys'
Questions keep bombarding me
Will I find what I'm looking for?
Possibly not, but really, I know
The solution to all my woes... is me

©Ritu 2021

So, this week, I’ve asked Ritu to choose the prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.


See you tomorrow for the new poetry challenge!

#Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 221 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Welcome! Check out the NEW main menu item: Poetry Book Publishing Links to find poetry book publishing links, including links to literary journals and poetry magazines accepting submissions of poetry. If you know of a link to add to this list, let me know by email to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. ❤

This week, Jude chose the words for you to select your synonyms:

Search & Lost

For the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheat sheet below:

View Cheat-sheet

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

https://www.sodacoffee.com/syllables Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more. NOTE: the site address has changed.

howmanysyllables.com This site does the hard work for you. It’s up and working again.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using one of these forms: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, Badger Hexastich (hexastich for short), and Abhanga. Don’t forget the Diatelle, which is an optional form found here.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #SoloRenga, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #Badger Hexastich, #Abhanga, #Diatelle

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY STARS | #PoetsChoice

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was poet’s choice, always a favorite!

I always look forward to the beginning of the month because you all can choose a syllabic form of your choice. It’s always fun to see the creativity! This week’s poetry was filled with lovely photos, drawings, and even a painting!

Heather wrote a cinquain swirl HERE which was a unique form.

Selma wrote a metered abecedarian poem HERE. It ended up as 13 syllables per line!

Make sure and stop by and read Kerfe’s haiku HERE along with her painting!

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena10.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr19.Heather
2.Trent McDonald11.Laura McHarrie20.Donna Matthews
3.Selma12.theindieshe21.Heather 2
4.Gwen Plano13.Dorinda Duclos22.Jules
5.Annette Rochelle Aben14.Ritu Bhathal23.Ruth
6.willowdot2115.Erlyn Olivia24.Sally Cronin
7.Padre16.anita dawes25.Erlyn Olivia 2
8.Laura17.Kerfe Roig26.Dr. Crystal Grimes
9.Cheryl18.M J Mallon 27.
28.
 Kat
and Pat

Have a ZEN Monday… See you tomorrow for a new challenge!

#TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 220, #POET’SCHOICE

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Chloe & Sophie come home today! Let’s celebrate the first of the month!

Happy April! It’s the first of the month and you know what that means! Word Crafters, choose your own syllabic poetry form, theme, words, images, etc. It’s up to you! This opportunity only happens once a month!

WAIT…

Are you looking for inspiration for your syllabic poetry? Find an image on Pixabay.com or experiment with “found poetry” to find some inspiration. Another option is to try some magnetic poetry. You still have to count syllables, but it’s like putting together a puzzle! Use this opportunity to try a new form!

The Poet’s Collective features an index of Syllabic Poetry Forms. Check it out!

This challenge is a true poet’s choice! Use any syllabic poetry form that you’d like. As long as there are syllables to count, you’re good to go! Be creative. If your form is something new, teach us how to write it. Have fun!

For this challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet below, and/or any other syllabic form you’d like to try.

Here are some impressive sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

https://www.sodacoffee.com/syllables Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more. NOTE: the site address has changed. I created an account for easy access.

How Many Syllables.com Counts your syllables and helps you find rhyming words too!

I don't get it

THE RULES

*Write a syllabic poem of your choice. If you write a “seventeen-syllable poem” add that to your post. No need to call it a haiku or senryu unless you are writing the English forms.

*Post it on your blog.

*Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the HTTPS:// address of this post into your post).

*Copy your published link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

*Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

*Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

*Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

Follow the schedule listed below:

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #Tanka Prose, #micropoetry, #renga, #solo-renga, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #Gogyohka, #Badgerhexastich, #Abhanga, #SyllabicPoetry, #Diatelle, #Seventeen-SyllablePoem

Now, have fun and write some poetry!