#TANKA TUESDAY Weekly #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 230 #EKPHRASTIC #PHOTOPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Welcome! Check out the main menu item: Poetry Book Publishing Links to find poetry book publishing links, including links to literary journals and poetry magazines accepting submissions of poetry. I update these links (sometimes daily) as I find more publishing opportunities. If you know of a link to add to this list, let me know by email to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. ❤

It’s the third week of the month! Time for an Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

This challenge explores Ekphrastic writing inspired by visual art (photographs). Kerfe Roig provided a piece of her art for this month’s challenge.

Image Credit: Kerfe Roig

For this challenge, write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet (click the link below) inspired by the artwork:

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

sodacoffee.com

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and the number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

How Many Syllables

This site counts syllables and helps you find words that rhyme.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using one of these forms: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, Badger Hexastich (hexastich for short), and Abhanga. Don’t forget the Diatelle, which is an optional form found here.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.
  • The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.
Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #Solo-Renga, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Choka, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #Badger Hexastich, #Abhanga, #Diatelle

So, Word Crafters… who wants to have fun and write some poetry?


#Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Stars #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to choose synonyms for the words, “dawn & twilight,” using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, choka, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, & diatelle poetry.

Remember, in Japanese syllabic poetry, there is no capitalization on the first word in each line of your poem. Most of the American forms do not use capitalization either. Why? Syllabic poetry is written in breathy phrases, not sentences.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Cheryl8.Jules15.Kerfe Roig
2.Padre9.s. s.16.Colleen Chesebro
3.Trent McDonald10.anita dawes17.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr
4.Annette Rochelle Aben11.Gwen Plano18.kittysverses
5.TJS Sherman12.Heather19.Marsha
6.Elizabeth13.Ruth Klein aka Ruth Scribbles20.Sally Cronin
7.Susan Joy Clark14.Goutam Dutta21.You’re next!

What an amazing bunch of poems this week. Thanks so much for joining in and having fun with Gwen’s synonyms.

This week, I chose to feature TJS Sherman‘s poem, “Painters Duel–Dawn versus Twilight.” This reverse Etheree is written in breathy phrases that bring the reader back to the title. The imagery is rich: “purple and orange complementary colors illuminating the sky at opposite ends of the day…” I also like the idea of dawn and twilight competing to be the most beautiful. Notice the shape of the poem—it could be a metaphor for the passage of a day (dawn into twilight, the most light ending in the least light, the day coming—the day going). I like the hopeful and positive message this poem leaves behind.

purple and orange complimentary
colors illuminating the sky
at opposite ends of the day
dawn and twilight are artists
painting skies competing
for most inspiring
the day coming
day going
yet to
be

© TJS Sherman

I also want to share, Ken Gierke’s poem: Anticipation ~ chōka & haiku. I’ve wanted to add this form to our Japanese poetry for some time, so today I did. You will find the choka form on the cheat sheet with instructions on how to write this form. Thank you, Ken!

The chōka (long poem) was the storytelling form of Japanese poetry from the 1st to the 13th century. It is unrhymed and written in alternating five and seven-syllable lines that end with an extra seven-syllable line.

The early form consisted of a series of katuata joined together. (A katuata is 5-7-7 (19) onji, or 5-7-5 (17) onji) and is required for your poem. It is composed of any number of couplets made up of alternating 5-7 onji (sound syllables) per line. In English, we can only treat the onji as a syllable.

A nine-line chōka is 5-7-5-7-5-7-5-7-7 or 5-7-7-5-7-5-7-7-7. Chōka often were followed by one or more short poems called hanka, or “envoys,” summarizing, supplementing, or elaborating on, the contents of the main poem. A tanka would serve as an envoy.

This week, I’ve asked TJS Sherman to choose the two words from which we will choose our synonyms for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Don’t forget to connect with the Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse at wordweavingpoetryjournal.com to learn the theme of this first journal. Submissions are open until July 15, 2021. Follow Word Weaving on Twitter @word_weaving.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#Tanka Tuesday Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 229, #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Welcome! Check out the NEW main menu item: Poetry Book Publishing Links to find poetry book publishing links, including links to literary journals and poetry magazines accepting submissions of poetry. If you know of a link to add to this list, let me know by email to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. ❤

It’s the second week of the month! Are you ready to choose some syllables to use in your poetry? Gwen Plano from last month’s challenge picked your two words:

“Dawn & Twilight

On the Monday recap, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme words.

For this poetry challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the cheat sheet:

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

Sodacoffee.com

A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

I don't get it

The RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo-renga, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, and Abhanga. Don’t forget the optional forms HERE.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

Don't forget

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on social media

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma #Gogyohka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #SoloRenga, #BaxterHexastich, #Abhanga


SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN

The Word Weaving Poetry Journal is accepting entries of syllabic poetry. Learn more HERE.

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


#Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Stars: #PoetsChoice, No. 228

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was Poets Choice. At the first of the month, we can write any syllabic poetry form of our choice.

Remember: In Japanese syllabic poetry, there is no capitalization on the first word in each line of your poem. Most of the American forms do not use capitalization either. Why? Because we write syllabic poetry in breathy phrases, not sentences.

On the first of the month, you can write any syllabic poetry form of your choice. The rest of the time, we write our syllabic poetry in one of the forms listed, and we follow a schedule (posted below).

I do this for a couple of reasons. It requires those of you who would like to enter contests or to submit your poetry to literary journals the opportunity to learn how to follow their rules. This challenge gives you that practice. Besides, why enter a challenge if you don’t follow the rules? That’s the challenging part. ❤

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.ladyleemanila11.Reena Saxena21.Vashti Quiroz- Vega
2.Susan Joy Clark12.Linda Lee Lyberg22.Annette Rochelle Aben
3.Jules13.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr23.Colleen Chesebro
4.Trent McDonald14.Anisha24.Marsha
5.willowdot2115.D. L. Finn25.s. s.
6.Cheryl16.anita dawes26.Sally Cronin
7.Eugenia17.Myrna Migala27.Kerfe Roig
8.TJS Sherman18.theindieshe28.
9.Elizabeth19.Jude  
10.Gwen Plano20.M J Mallon  

The first of the month’s challenge is always fun! I love seeing all the new forms! This week was fabulous. Check out some of these poems!

Jude wrote a ballad that included an Etheree.

S. S. wrote a Brazilian haiku with a rhyme scheme.

Kerfe wrote a “Kerf” and I liked it so much I added this form to the optional forms HERE.

Please take the time to visit the other poets. This is how we perfect our poetry writing craft from receiving feedback from others. Always be kind and supportive. ❤

Don’t forget to connect with the Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse at wordweavingpoetryjournal.com to learn the theme of this first journal. All syllabic poets are welcome!

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

#Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 228, #Poet’sChoice

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Happy JUNE! It’s the first of the month and you know what that means! Word Crafters, choose your own syllabic poetry form, theme, words, images, etc. It’s up to you! This opportunity only happens once a month!

WAIT…

Are you looking for inspiration for your syllabic poetry? Find an image on Pixabay.com or experiment with “found poetry” to find some inspiration. Another option is to try some magnetic poetry. You still have to count syllables, but it’s like putting together a puzzle! Use this opportunity to try a new form!

The Poet’s Collective features an index of Syllabic Poetry Forms. Check it out!

This challenge is a true poet’s choice! Use any syllabic poetry form that you’d like. As long as there are syllables to count, you’re good to go! Be creative. If your form is something new, teach us how to write it. Have fun!

For this challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge cheat sheet below, and/or any other syllabic form you’d like to try.

Here are some impressive sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

https://www.sodacoffee.com/syllables Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more. NOTE: the site address has changed. I created an account for easy access.

How Many Syllables.com Counts your syllables and helps you find rhyming words too!

I don't get it

THE RULES

*Write a poem using any syllabic form you’d like. However, you must follow the rules of the form you use. (Do not capitalize the first word of each line in your poetry).

*Post it on your blog.

*Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the HTTPS:// address of this post into your post).

*Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).

*Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.

*Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

*Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

See the URL in the browser image below. This is what the URL of your post will look like after you published your poem. Cut and paste that address into Mr. Linky below:

Follow the schedule listed below:

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #Tanka Prose, #micropoetry, #renga, #solo-renga, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #Gogyohka, #Badgerhexastich, #Abhanga, #SyllabicPoetry, #Diatelle, #Seventeen-SyllablePoem

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


#Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Stars Theme Challenge No. 227

Happy Memorial Day. As a veteran and the wife of a 100% disabled veteran, I like to honor my fellow military brothers and sisters who lost their lives serving our county in the line of duty. True patriots never forget!

brave Americans
who served... died to keep us free
Memorial Day
honor the true patriots
be true to democracy

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Memorial Day 2021


Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to write your poem using the theme of travel/journeys using one of these forms: haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, and Abhanga poetry.

In Japanese syllabic poetry there is no capitalization on the first word in each line of your poem. Most of the American forms do not use capitalization either. Why? Syllabic poetry is written in breathy phrases, not sentences.

On the first of the month, you can write any syllabic poetry form of your choice. The rest of the time, we write our syllabic poetry in one of the forms listed, and we follow a schedule (posted below).

I do this for a couple of reasons. It requires those of you who would like to enter contests or to submit your poetry to literary journals the opportunity to learn how to follow their rules. This challenge gives you that practice. Besides, why enter a challenge if you don’t follow the rules? That’s the challenging part. ❤

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.ladyleemanila 9.TJS Sherman 17.Ruth Scribbles
2.Cheryl 10.kittysverses 18.theindieshe
3.Selma 11.Susan Joy Clark 19.D. L. Finn
4.Padre 12.Jules 20.Kerfe Roig
5.Trent 13.s. s. 21.Anisha @crazienerds
6.Eugenia 14.Gwen Plano 22.Sally Cronin
7.willowdot21 15.Elizabeth 23.
8.Annette Rochelle Aben 16.The Versesmith   

The theme of travel seemed to appeal to many of you. I loved all the creativity! Well done!

This week, I was captivated by Jules’ haibun and haiku sequence, “Fractured Traveler.”

She stayed true to the haiku form with no first-line capitalization. The haiku leaves one with the feeling of loneliness, and we sense the journey is a private pilgrimage. The first and last haiku establish the kigo (season word) which designates the time of year. This sequence actually comes full circle, repeating the first haiku at the end which is a great segway into the prose portion of the poem.

The prose is not overstated or flowery. We learn the story of the un-monk, or un-nun, who in the Buddhist tradition carries a begging bowl on their journey to reach enlightenment. In much of Thailand, the monks and nuns own no possessions and must beg for their meals. In the Thai tradition, the men in the family are required to serve in the monastery as a rite of passage which also honors his family.

I liked the internal argument and subsequent answer in the prose: “it is the journey…” and the goal of reaching enlightenment that keeps this individual on the straight and narrow journey. Notice how true to human nature this piece is. The last line: “Whether the goal of enlightenment is reached will be debatable” makes this haibun something we can all relate to.

“Fractured Traveler”

flower moon
skylark’s melody
wistful tune

opal stone
talisman, to pet
reassure

existence
with each passing breath
time passes

slow pilgrim
walking; a deranged
dull silence

rice bowl hung
on a course rope belt
unfulfilled

flower moon
skylark’s melody
wistful tune

Miles to trod with staff in hand, course hooded robe, barely sandaled feet. An un-monk, un-nun, under duress, stressed yet obligated to attempt to gain sanity by following a saint’s trail through an unfamiliar territory. A vow of silence ensures only internal arguments with oneself. Repeat, “it is the journey…” Eventually the destination will be achieved. Whether the goal of enlightenment is reached will be debatable.

© JP/dh

This week, I’ve asked Jules to choose the theme prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your selection to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Don’t forget to connect with the Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse at wordweavingpoetryjournal.com to learn the theme of this first journal.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

Helpful Tips & Tricks for Submitting Poetry to Literary Journals

Syllabic poetry has specific rules that should always be followed when submitting your poetry to literary journals. No one likes rejections. Here are a few things that poets should watch out for:

  1. Count your syllables and the number of lines specified for the form you are writing. Then, double-check your poem before submission. Use sodacoffee.com to check syllables.
  2. Check your spelling. Most journals will not correct minor mistakes. Spelling mistakes can spell rejection.
  3. Does your poem need a title? Do your research on which forms require a title or not.
  4. Do not capitalize the first letter of each line of your poetry. Word and WordPress naturally capitalize the first word on each line, but it’s incorrect in Japanese poetry and most syllabic forms. Write your poetry like a pro… don’t capitalize!
  5. Here are the basic rules for the syllabic forms. Make sure you know how to write the forms before you submit them.

READ: Lit Mag Submissions 101

READ: Word Craft: Prose & Poetry, The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry to learn how to write the typical syllabic poetry forms.

WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 227, #THEMEPROMPT

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the fourth week of the month! Are you ready for a theme prompt? I didn’t hear from Padre whose turn it was to select the theme… so, you guys are stuck with me. Sorry. 😀

Go where this month’s prompt leads you:

Travel/Journeys

Poem Analysis.com explains:

“When one considers this wide-ranging theme, there are many possible subjects to keep in mind. A journey can consist of just about anything. One could be moving physically traveling from place to place, or be transforming in some significant way. The journey might be somewhere specific that can actually be listed on a map, or somewhere less tangible, such as the afterlife.” 

Read more on poemanalysis.com

On the Monday before the next challenge, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme. Email me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet:

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

sodacoffee.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. A simple yet very powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

I don't get it

THE RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Renga, Solo-Renga, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Ehteree, Nonet, and Shadorma.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #Renga, #Solo-Renga, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma, #Badger Hexastich, #Abhanga, #Diatelle

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


#Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Stars: #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our poetry using one of these forms: (haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, renga, solo renga, cinquain and its variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga poetry) inspired by Trent McDonald’s photo shown below:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA: Image credit: Trent McDonald

Remember… the first of the month you can write any syllabic poetry form of your choice. The rest of the time, we write our syllabic poetry in one of the forms listed, and we follow a schedule (posted below).

I do this for a couple of reasons. It requires those who would like to enter contests or to submit their poetry to literary journals to learn how to follow their rules. This challenge gives you that practice. Besides, why enter a challenge if you don’t follow the rules? That’s the challenging part. ❤

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Cheryl 9.TJS Sherman 17.Vashti Quiroz- Vega 
2.ladyleemanila 10.anita dawes 18.Ruth Klein aka Ruth Scribbles 
3.Gwen Plano 11.Elizabeth 19.kittysverses 
4.Eugenia 12.sangeetha 20.Sally Cronin 
5.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr 13.Balroop Singh 21.Kerfe Roig 
6.Jules 14.theindieshe 22.
7.Trent McDonald 15.Jude   
8.Padre 16.Marsha   

The challenge this week explored Ekphrastic writing inspired by visual art (photographs). When you write poetry based on a painting or photograph, we work with symbolism and metaphors. I asked everyone to not just describe what they saw in the image. I suggested we check out How to Write Ekphrastic Poetry and learn how to apply some techniques used in that article to our own poem.

I think you all did that and more! Photo prompts always bring out some of the best poetry and you guys did not disappoint! A few of these poems really stood out. Please check out:


Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr


TJS Sherman


sangeetha


Jude
 


Sally Cronin


anita dawes

Kerfe Roig’s poem, “Cascade,” was outstanding. This Badger hexastich says it all with only a few words. Kerfe captured the essence of the waterfall. I felt the poem was a metaphor for living life to the fullest. Well done!

Painting by Kerfe Roig
"Cascade"

falling
gravitating
sheer and continuous
sparkled currents rising
in reflection
flowing

© Kerfe Roig

This week, I’ve asked Kerfe Roig to choose the photo for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

Don’t forget to connect with the Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse at wordweavingpoetryjournal.com to learn the theme of this first journal.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

Finding Poetic Inspiration

I’ve had a few poets ask me about poetic inspiration. Where do you find it, and how do you go about acquiring this precious commodity?

I dedicated a section in Word Craft: Prose & Poetry, The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry to just that subject. In my opinion, inspiration is everywhere. But not everyone feels that way.

Here are a few suggestions to find your own poetic inspiration:

  • Get outside in nature. Go for walks and observe the world around you.
  • Take notes. Keep your observations and thoughts in a notebook or in your phone.
  • Take photos. If you photograph your inspiration, you can write about how the photo captured the scene and memorialized it for that moment in time.
  • Write about your own experiences.
  • Read other poetry written by the greats and new poets.
  • Free write your thoughts for five minutes and see what inspires you.
  • Create a vision board!

Yes… create a vision board for your poetry. This is a fun exercise. If you love to take photos, create a vision board for your poem.

Vision board created with Canva.com

I used a vision board to create this haiku. I went through a bunch of photos on Canva.com for inspiration.

Things to note:

  1. Haiku are untitled.
  2. My syllable count is 3-5-3.
  3. My kigo is loud thunder—which signifies a season (really any season). It can thunder in all four seasons depending on where you live in the United States.
  4. The ending should be a surprise. This is the pivot. That is when you talk about one thing and then switch to talking about another thing. In my haiku, sunshine rain is the pivot.
  5. The pivot is where we create that juxtaposition of divergent or convergent images that compliment each other. We recognize this reaction as the “aha” moment.

We hear the thunder and see the clouds swirling. Then, the sun breaks through and the rain begins to fall. It looks like it’s raining sunshine. It’s a magical moment, one that you can remember by immortalizing it with a haiku.

We can use vision boards for many kinds of literary inspiration. Charli Mills, from Carrotranch.com, taught me how to use a vision board in her “Vision Planting” class I took with her this spring.

Charli Mills’ advice:

“Represent your vision with the tools of manifestation—use a vision board to create poetry.” @Charli_Mills #inspiration

I’ve done the work of researching these forms for you. Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is available as an Ebook and a Print book. Let’s write syllabic poetry together! ❤

I’m still having glitches with the themes on the wordcraftpoetry blog. WordPress must be doing more updates. The simpler themes seem to work better. So here I am, again… Sorry for all the switching around. This theme seems to be stable.