WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

What a great week of poetry! It appears everyone enjoyed writing senryū. We all learn together: I did more research on the form. Read this post: Senryū or Senryu to get a better sense of what this form is all about.

Many thanks to everyone who joined in!

Here are the poet’s links from last week’s senryū challenge:

1.ladyleemanila12.Paula Light23.Yvette M Calleiro
2.Jude13.Annette Rochelle Aben24.Pat
3.Reena Saxena14.Li/ Lisa25.Dr B
4.willowdot2115.Eugenia26.Ruth Klein
5.Gwen Plano16.Mike U.27.The Versesmith
6.Britta Benson17.Reena Saxena28.Selma
7.Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr18.Roberta Writes29.Colleen Chesebro
8.Jules19.D. L. Finn30.kittysverses
9.Elizabeth20.Balroop Singh31.s. s.
10.ben Alexander21.Kerfe32.Mark Bozeman
11.Cheryl22.AJ33.You’re next!

This #TankaTuesday challenge explores Ekphrastic poetry, inspired by works of art.

I’m fascinated by fine art. Sadly, I know little about the subject. Much of my newfound observations come from Rebecca Budd’s blog, Chasing Art. Many thanks to Rebecca for the inspiration.

This painting was featured on Rebecca’s post: GEORGE HENRY BOUGHTON “THE LADY OF THE SNOWS.”

How exciting it was to learn Boughton was from Norwich, England. This is a city I visited many years ago when I served in the USAF at RAF Lakenheath.

(Find more of Boughton’s paintings on ArtUK.org).

❄️ This week, using the painting as your inspiration, please write either a syllabic poetry form or a freestyle poem, including a syllabic form. ❄️

Boughton, George Henry; The Lady of the Snows; Walker Art Gallery; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/the-lady-of-the-snows-97671

Your challenge for this week:

Write your poem using a syllabic form from the cheat sheet or from the poetscollective.org/poetryforms. If you choose to write freestyle poetry, please include a syllabic form, too. Play with how the two forms can connect in interesting ways.

Here is more information on how to write an Ekphrastic poem: WHAT is Ekphrastic Poetry?

“Ekphrastic poems exist to respond to a piece of art critically, analytically, and reverentially.”

Ekphrastic poetry explained

Here are some sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables:

traveldailylife.com/syllables

A simple yet powerful syllable counter for poems and text which will count the total number of syllables and number of syllable per line for poems like haikus, limericks, and more.

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

☀️ ⛅️ ☀️

Please include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the URL, the https:// address of this post into your post).

Copy your link into the Mr. Linky written in green script below:

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Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.

Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

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Let’s Write Poetry & Paint With Words!

44 thoughts on “#TankaTuesday #Ekphrastic #Poetry Challenge, 1/24/22, No. 304

    1. Thank you so much, Dr. B. I’m thrilled you enjoyed the inspiration. There are some Ekphrastic journals you can submit poetry to which is great fun. Thanks for ordering my book. I hope it encourages you to try all of the syllabic forms. They are all great fun to write. 🙏🏻 💛

      Liked by 1 person

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  2. Hi Colleen, what an evocative image! I love it.
    Please clarify: “a freestyle poem, including a syllabic form.”
    Does it mean two poems – one freestyle and one syllabic form if we choose freestyle? Or do I end with a syllabic poem? I am confused.

    Liked by 1 person

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