#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 286 |#ThemePrompt

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s challenge was to write our choice of syllabic poem, using a form from the cheat sheet or a syllabic form from the Poetscollective.org using the theme of “Lessons from Nature,” suggested by Sarah.

Happy Birthday Tanka Tuesday! On August 27th, we’ve completed our sixth year of writing syllabic poetry together. In the beginning, I gave two prompt words, which for the first challenge were “harvest & moon.” In those days, we only wrote tanka poems. The rest of the forms came later. Thanks so much for your creativity, and all the gifts of your time. I look forward to every week we spent together. 💜 💚 💛

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.ladyleemanila10.Balroop Singh19.kittysverses
2.Reena Saxena11.D. L. Finn20.Vashti Quiroz- Vega
3.Harmony Kent12.Sylvia Cognac21.Ruth Klein
4.Selma13.Gwen Plano22.Margaret 21
5.ben Alexander14.Jude23.sally cronin
6.willowdot2115.Jules24.D. Avery
7.Britta Benson16.sangeetha25.Jane Aguiar
8.Ritu Bhathal17.Colleen Chesebro26.You’re next!
9.Cheryl18.Annette Rochelle Aben  

Last week we discussed haiku and the use of a kigo (season word) in this form. My research bears out the use of a kigo in this form (see below).

For this challenge, if you write a haiku without a kigo, please call it “micro-poetry” or “haiku-like,” or “pseudo-haiku.” The same rules would apply to a haibun, as that form contains a haiku.

🆕 I’ve added a widget on the front Welcome page of this blog, and also a side widget with a link to kigo season words. At the bottom of the season word page, there is a 23 page PDF download you can save for your own use HERE.

Sites of Interest:

GraceGuts, Michael Dylan Welch

Tofugu: Haiku, A Whole Lot More than 5-7-5

Graceguts: Further Reading, Haiku Fundamentals and Advanced Haiku


Books for Reference:

The Haiku Handbook, by William J. Higginson & Penny Harter

Haiku: A Poet’s Guide, by Lee Gurga


The Lessons from nature theme hit the spot for me this week. As usual, the poetry was outstanding. Here are a few poems that caught my eye:

Sally Cronin: Her Etheree, Size Doesn’t Matter, shows us how syllabic poetry makes lovely “spoken” poetry, as well!

Ritu Bhathal: Tanka, Lessons from Nature reminds us a perfect lesson from Mother Nature.

This week, I went this Sangeetha’s haiku. Her kigo is “new straw.” This kigo gives you a hint at the season, which in this context refers to late autumn. This haiku also alludes to the passage of time, moving from season to season.

journey to winter
new straw drink dew drops
sun-kissed one last time

© Sangeetha

This week, I’ve asked Sangeetha, from Mindfills, to choose the theme prompt for next month’s challenge. Please email your words to me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

 💜 September Specific Theme: Jules

 💚 September Photo Prompt: Britta

 💛 September Theme Prompt: Sangeetha

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See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

48 Comments

  1. Happy birthday to the #tankatuesday. Six years ago I didn’t even know what a haiku was.😭. I learnt that here just over 2years ago.💖
    I’m still obstinate about those kigo bits. Im going to research on short african/tropical nature poems and do those, and stop attempting haiku in protest. There can’t be caps on “nature” words, even for seasons. Then people who live in equatorial regions like the Congo and amazon with basically one season all year?
    I hope to advocate for haiku translations that factor in a global world, or just leave the form be.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi, Jude. Your comment caught my eye, as I’ve been wondering the same thing. Does the kigo have to be a specific word from a list, or can the kigo be an image that represents a particular season or the passing of a season from one to the next, without necessarily using one of the words on the list?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Okay, but what I’m protesting is this new challenge rule, because I take part in the challenge. If Japanese forms created by and for Japanese culture, could be made to accept Western views and translations, why can’t they accept all others? It is a nature form, and nature is for all of us. Season has many synonyms, it can’t be caged into autumns and winters. I will protest these translations away from your challenge but I will not be calling my haiku of home micro-poetry or ‘haiku-like’.

        Like

  2. Happy Birthday, ‘Tanka Tuesday!’ 🥳 It’s been a fun, inspiring, and enlightening six years! congratulations to Sangeetha and the special mentions. Thank you, Sis❣️

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Happy Happy Tanka Tuesday!!!

    I’ve enjoyed writing for each one of the tanka Tuesdays. You’ve been an inspiration!
    Thank you Colleen for selecting my haiku! I’m honoured 🙏💕

    Liked by 1 person

      1. IMost welcome! I don’t think it has run its course because of the # of participants it draws. My challenge seems to be growing since I moved to WordPress.com. As with any challenge, the popularity comes and goes. 💖

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Once again, I missed out on this amazing week of poetry. I did, however, click on every link and share it. Life is just too busy between my full time teaching job, my part-time job, and my son’s football. I’ll try again this week to participate. Fingers crossed! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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