#TankaTuesday #Poetry Stars No. 269 | #SpecificForm: tanka prose

Welcome to our weekly poetry stars’ celebration. This week’s #TankaTuesday challenge was to write tanka prose. Some of you missed the prose part… but that’s okay because our challenges are about practice. Go back to the challenge post HERE and read about tanka prose. It’s important to learn the forms.

It’s that time of year again… my birthday! WOO HOO!

Many thanks to everyone who joined in below:

1.Reena Saxena 9.D. L. Finn 17.theindieshe 
2.Harmony Kent 10.Kerfe 18.Jane Aguiar 
3.willowdot21 11.Jude 19.Selma 
4.Veera 12.Jules 20.Ruth Klein 
5.Gwen Plano 13.Ken Giereke / rivrevlogr 21.Sally Cronin 
6.Elizabeth 14.Colleen Chesebro 22.You’re next!
7.Sarah David 15.Goutam Dutta   
8.Yvette M Calleiro (correct link) 16.ben Alexander   

I was so impressed with your poetry this week. Tanka prose is the form you should use when you’re looking to express your thoughts and feelings. The tanka portion (waka) is written in short phrases, like a song.

This week, Sally Cronin’s tanka prose was extra special. She included a recording of herself reading her poem. Not only is her voice musical, but the tanka prose is also outstanding.

Some haijin argue that Japanese poetry shouldn’t be read out loud. Why not? For me, spoken poetry creates a deeper connection to the poet and what they’ve written about. We write poetry to share our perceptions of the world with others. We connect through a poet’s words, written or spoken. Don’t be afraid to record your syllabic poetry. Experiment and have fun!

Seasons

the seasons of life
as in nature are defined
from cradle to grave
each marks the passage of time
to the place we are today.

In the spring of my life I was hopeful and eager. In the summer sun I blossomed and thrived. The autumn still offers bright days, but they are tinged with chill winds created by the evil humans can do. I am wary of what winter will bring. It threatens to dilute the hope I still cherish.

I question myself
can I still find the desire
the words and the will
to foster warmth in the hearts
of those who ride icy winds

© Sally G. Cronin

Starting this month, I’m opening this challenge up to you, the poets. I’ll select someone who can email me which form they want to learn more about and I’ll do the rest. ❤

This week, I’ve asked Sally Cronin to choose the specific form for next month’s challenge. Please email me at least a week before the challenge to tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com. Thanks.

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

40 Comments

    1. Thanks Liz and for the lovely comment on the blog . I did wonder if perhaps it was a copyright issue in ancient times. Only those who were privileged could read the work… reciting it meant it could be repeated by others who might take the credit.. who knows.. I do think that there is an additional element when read out loud…hugs

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  1. Sally’s was my favorite this week as well, and her voice is just lovely! I enjoyed reading everyone’s poems. I’m looking forward to what this week brings us. Happy birthday, Colleen! 🙂

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  2. Oh! Well what beautiful Tanka and prose were we bedded with this week. It was lovely to hear Sally’s voice, your right Colleen she reads it so well 💜💜

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  3. Sally,

    Lovely Tanka prose and the reading too! I like the autumn of my life… yes I agree the news of others misbehaviors is chilling. I can only hope that I can give support to my own grandchildren so that maybe they (as well as their parents and us elders) can help give hope to those in need.

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      1. With our love for writing and sharing what we write… I believe we can achomplish that – maybe even with a little bit of action. 🙂

        All the best.

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