What is a Rhyme Scheme?

Did you know plants respond to the sounds of our voices? Sounds like an opportunity to read your poetry aloud! (Talking to Plants)

Hello Word Crafters! As I continue to introduce more syllabic poetry forms featuring an end rhyming scheme, I thought we would discuss what an end rhyme scheme is. Here is a quick definition:

A rhyme scheme is the pattern of sound found at the end of lines. These rhyme schemes are given a letter, usually beginning with the letter A.

A four-line poem with a rhyme scheme is something like this:

The first line rhymes with the third line, and the second line rhymes with the fourth line. The rhyme scheme is ABAB.

Roses are red,
violets are blue,
Shakespeare is dead?
I had no clue.

Let’s use the Abhanga syllabic form as an example. The Abhanga is written in any number of four-line verses. The syllable count is 6/6/6/4 per stanza.

In this form, only L2 and L3 rhyme. Often, the letter x, is used to denote an unrhymed end word. This rhyme scheme is:

xaax, x = unrhymed.

magic is found within 
breathe deep into your core 
open your heart and soar 
find inner peace 

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

We use rhymes in all different kinds of poetry. They aren’t always used in patterns or at the end of lines, which means not all rhyming poetry has a rhyme scheme.

We only use rhyme schemes for poems that use end rhyme—which is rhymes at the end of lines.

Litcharts.com has an excellent discussion of end rhyme schemes you can read HERE.

Other Types of Rhyme Schemes

Alternate rhyme is ABAB CDCD EFEF used in ballads.

Coupled rhyme schemes occur in pairs like AABBCC. The rhymes are called couplets.

Momorhyme use one rhyme through the poem like AAAA.

Sandwich rhyme schemes are like ABA or ABBA.

Chain rhyme is where stanzas are linked together by rhymes that carry over from one stanza to the next, like ABA BCB CDC.

That’s just a few of the different rhyme schemes. For now, we will continue to work with the Abhanga syllabic form until I find a few more forms to share and experiment with. If you find an interesting syllabic form with a rhyme scheme, link to this post and I’ll check it out! Thanks.

Who’s ready to write some syllabic poetry?

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