The Diatelle Poem | Merril D. Smith, Poetry Star

Merril Smith shares how to create a diatelle poem. Merril says:

“The Diatelle is a fun, syllable counting form like the etheree with a twist. The syllable structure of the diatelle is as follows: 1/2/3/4/6/8/10/12/10/8/6/4/3/2/1, but unlike an ethere, has a set rhyme pattern of abbcbccaccbcbba. This poetry form may be written on any subject matter and looks best center aligned in a diamond shape.”

Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Merril also shows us how to create the rhyme scheme below:

“Maybe everyone does this, but if not, maybe it’s helpful to see. I made myself a template to keep track of syllable/lines and rhymes. I do this for many forms.”

a1 Light

b2 comes, goes

b3 so it flows

c4 to earth and sea

b6 flaming grassy meadows–

c8 with photons streaming, gild a tree

c10 though shadows loom below, we let them be,

a12 pretend we do not see the coming of the night

c10 but live, walk, talk–and love, the apogee

c8 of our beings–humanity

b6 with stardust traces glows

c4 but faintly—see?

b3 The flickers

b2 dim, grow

a1 bright.

Visit her post below:

I love learning novel poetry forms. What makes the diatelle so fun, is that it is syllabic and rhyming! If you’re interested in learning more about rhyme schemes, this should help:

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About Colleen Chesebro: WordCraftPoetry

Colleen M. Chesebro is a Michigan Poet who loves crafting syllabic poetry, flash fiction, and creative fiction and nonfiction. Colleen sponsors a weekly syllabic poetry challenge, called #TankaTuesday, on wordcraftpoetry.com where participants learn how to write traditional and current forms of syllabic poetry. A published author, Colleen is also an editor of “Word Weaving, a Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse, also found on wordcraftpoetry.com. Colleen’s mission is to bring the craft of writing syllabic poetry to anyone who thinks they can’t be a poet. Recently, she created the Double Ennead, a 99-syllable poetry form for the Carrot Ranch literary community at carrotranch.com. Colleen’s poetry has appeared in various anthologies and journals including “Hedgerow-a journal of small poems,” and “Poetry Treasures1 & 2” a collection of poetry from the poet/author guests of Robbie Cheadle on the “Treasuring Poetry” blog series on “Writing to be Read." Colleen published “Word Craft: Prose & Poetry, The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry,” which illustrates how to write various syllabic poetry forms used in her Tanka Tuesday challenges; and a collection of poetry, flash fiction, and short stories called, “Fairies, Myths & Magic: A Summer Celebration,” dedicated to the Summer Solstice. She contributed a short story called “The Changeling,” in the “Ghostly Rites Anthology 2020,” published by Plaisted Publishing House. Find Colleen at Word Craft: Prose & Poetry at wordcraftpoetry.com.
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33 Comments

  1. A beautiful form 💜

  2. Thanks for the shout out and kind words, Colleen! 😀
    Just to be clear, the quotation at the top describing the form comes from Shadow Poetry–those are not my words.

  3. great work with this form, well done!

  4. Looks very challenging. I might just have to try it.

  5. Good idea! Merril used the form beautifully. (K)

  6. I was very impressed (and taken) with Merril’s poem.

  7. Wow! Merril mastered the Diatelle poetry form with her piece.

  8. That looks challenging! Merril did a great job of making the syllable and rhyme requirements fade into the background. I love that – when the structure fades and we’re left with the beautiful words. Well done, Meril and wonderful share, Colleen.

  9. Looks like a good challenge. Great explanation. Thanks Sis <3

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