Colleen’s 2020 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 184, #SpecificForm

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the fifth Tuesday of the month! This is our chance to work with a specific syllabic poetry form. Take this opportunity to learn more about the particular form.

This week’s form is:

Haibun

Here’s a quick review of the Haibun form which consists of prose and at least one Haiku.

Consider this a sneak peak of my new book, Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry which is in the final stages.

By the way, I need Haibun poetry to use as examples in the book. Same conditions as before. I use your poetry, you retain all rights to your work, and I quote you in the Bibliography. Thank you in advance!

  • Begin the haibun with a title. The title should hint at something barely noticeable in the beginning which comes together by the ending.
  • Your haibun prose can be written in present or past tense including, first person (I), third person (he/she), or first-person plural (we).
  • Subject matter: autobiographical prose, travel journal, a slice of life, memory, dream, character sketch, place, event, or object. Focus on one or two elements.
  • Keep your prose simple, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing should be overstated.
  • The length can be brief with one or two sentences with a haiku, or longer prose with a haiku sandwiched between, to longer memoir works including many haiku.
  • There are different Haibun styles: Idyll: (One prose paragraph and one haiku) haiku/prose, or prose/haiku; Verse Envelope: haiku/prose/haiku; Prose Envelope: prose/haiku/prose, including alternating prose and verse elements of your choice.
  • The prose tells the story and gives the information which helps to define the theme. It creates a mood through tone, paving the way for the haiku.
  • The haiku should act as a comparison—different yet somehow connected to the prose, as it moves the story forward by taking the narrative in another direction.
  • The haiku should not attempt to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the haiku resolves the conflict in an unexpected way. Sometimes, the haiku questions the resolution of the prose. While the prose is the narrative, the haiku is the revelation or the reaction.

As an added bit to the challenge… please use Frank J. Tassone’s photo as the inspiration for your Haibun. Frank says this spot is called Getrude’s Nose, a Rocky promenade located in Minnewaska Preserve State Park, in the Shawangunk Mountains outside New Paltz, New York (about a 2 hour drive out of NYC). Please include the copyright to the photo in your post.

© 2020 Frank J. Tassone

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet:

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE *NEW* RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Ehteree, Nonet, and Shadorma.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

Now, have fun and write some poetry!


Weekly Poetry Challenge Stars | Theme Prompt: @SCVincent

Pat R. from last month’s challenge picked this month’s theme. I know this challenge was difficult! Congratulations to everyone who took part. You stepped up and met the challenge head-on! Bravo to you all!

This month’s theme prompt:

“…In the world’s broad field of battle, In the bivouac of Life,
Be not like dumb, driven cattle! Be a hero in the strife…”

OR


“…Lives of great men all remind us
   We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
   Footprints on the sands of time…”

From:

A Psalm of Life

By American Poet, HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW

What The Heart Of The Young Man Said To The Psalmist

Here is a link to the full poem:
A Psalm of Life by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow | Poetry Foundation

Here are everyone’s links, courtesy of Mr. Linky:

1.Padre6.Sue Vincent11.Vashti Quiroz- Vega
2.Dave Madden7.kittysverses12.Sally Cronin
3.Tina Stewart Brakebill8.Traci Kenworth13.Merril D. Smith
4.joem18b9.Kerfe Roig14.Marsha Ingrao
5.Pat R10.Donna Matthews  

I know many of you thought this was difficult, but it’s all in interpreting Longfellow’s words. This will mean something different to everyone, I’m sure.

For example, Merril D. Smith said, “I did a bit of riffing on Longfellow. “Great men” and his pompous tone just makes me go there.” I loved her interpretation!

Click the link below to read her poem:

Some of you said that you had difficulty with Found Poetry. Wikipedia shares:

Found poetry is a type of poetry created by taking words, phrases, and sometimes whole passages from other sources and reframing them (a literary equivalent of a collage[1]) by making changes in spacing and lines, or by adding or deleting text, thus imparting new meaning. The resulting poem can be defined as either treated: changed in a profound and systematic manner; or untreated: virtually unchanged from the order, syntax and meaning of the poem.

The form was popularised by comedian Dave Gorman, who would include a found poem compiled from Internet comments around a topical theme in every episode of his television show Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish.

Wikipedia.com

Sue Vincent shows how she created her found poetry. Click the link below:

It was tough, picking only one poem to highlight. I went with Sue’s poem! Click the link above to stop by and leave her a comment.

Congratulations, Sue Vincent, it’s your turn to pick the theme for July’s theme prompt challenge. Please Email me your choice at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com a week before next month’s challenge.

See you tomorrow for a new challenge!

#TarotTuesday – The World – Writing and Music: Jan Sikes

I’m in the home stretch of finishing Word Craft – Prose & Poetry, my How-To book on how to write syllabic poetry for beginners. In the meantime, my #Fairy #Tarot #Friday readings have been put on hold.

But, never fear… Jan Sikes is here with her amazing #TarotTuesday spot on her blog. Please, enjoy. Her readings keep me sane in crazy times.

Source: #TarotTuesday – The World – Writing and Music

“Books That Changed Me”– 2020 Summer Edition! @ColleenChesebro @dehauthor @jhawker69 @boom_lyn – Author D.L. Finn

This is a re-blog of D.L. Finn’s post, below. I was honored and thrilled for my book, Fairies, Myths, and Magic ~ A Summer Celebration, to make Denise’s “Books that Changed Me,” Summer edition list.

There are other authors and books listed as well. Please have a read. You might find your next favorite book.

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“The longest day of the year has arrived along with thoughts of swimming in our lakes and rivers. It’s the perfect time of the year to lounge under the stars gazing at the possibilities while being serenaded by the crickets. Yes, summer is here, and when I’m not swimming or watching for a comet to streak across the sky, I will be reading and posting my reviews.”

“Today there will be a different look for my “Books That Changed Me” Summer Edition. I’ve changed the format and won’t be re-sharing my reviews for the books anymore. I want to focus more on the stories or poems that moved me enough to “change” me…”

Read more:

Source: “Books That Changed Me”– 2020 Summer Edition! @ColleenChesebro @dehauthor @jhawker69 @boom_lyn – Author D.L. Finn

COLLEEN’S 2020 #BOOK #REVIEWS – “The Man Who Found Birds among the Stars, Part Six: Merlin: A Biographical Fiction ,” BY AUTHOR, Lorinda J. Taylor, @TermiteWriter

Featuring Your Next Weekend Read!

About this Book

As preparation for the first star-mission continues, the new crew members begin to interact with one another, new relationships form, old ones continue to evolve, and life on Earth moves forward. Capt. Nikalishin’s wife persists in disrupting his life no matter how he tries to discourage her. Cmdr. Glencrosse remains under psychiatric treatment for his delusions about an entity out to destroy the mission, but nevertheless his Captain continues to support his appointment as Chief Engineer of the Ariana. Too many complexities exist in their relationship for either of them to cast the other aside.At last the mission’s destination and date of departure are set. Ian Glencrosse attempts to reconcile with his father, with ominous consequences which he reveals to no one. Furthermore, on the eve of departure, the High Feather makes another unexpected appearance … It’s too late to alter history …

Amazon.com

MY RECOMMENDATION

“Merlin,” is the sixth book in The Man Who Found Birds Among the Stars series by Lorinda J. Taylor. I have read and reviewed part one, “Eagle Ascendant,” HERE and part two, “Wounded Eagle” HERE and part three, “Bird of Prey,” HERE, part four, “Survivor,” HERE, and part five, “Phoenix Rises,” HERE.

I’ve read this series from the beginning onward. In book six, “Merlin,” Robbin Nikalishin (Captain Robbie) is deep into the Phenix Project interstellar program preparing for the Big Mission to the Eridanus, or Epsilon Eridani, a wandering pathway of stars.

The captain spends most of his time assembling his crew and building his team of space farers. There was an extensive amount of technical information shared which I could follow easily. In science fiction, the technical jargon matters and Taylor knows her quantum physics, or at least enough to make it all sound plausible. However, don’t worry. Her explanations made perfect sense. She dedicated much of the book to the training and testing of the ship and crew to prepare for their voyage to the stars.

Ian Glencrosse, the Chief Engineer and another survivor of the Darter disaster, continues to struggle with mental health issues. He hides most of this apprehension from Robbie and Dr. Winehandle, who hope he is ready for the voyage. Deep down, Ian’s convinced the mission is doomed, unless he takes some drastic action to ensure everyone’s safety. I picked up some dark vibes from Ian. Only time will tell how his story unravels.

Meanwhile, Captain Robbie hits another snag with his estranged wife, Fedaylia. When he went through terrible times before, she was the first to throw him under the bus. Now that things are looking up, the status seeking communication’s officer wants to be part of his life again. All I can tell you is that she is a real piece of work!

Then, there is Captain Robbie’s relationship with Linna Katsopolos to factor into this equation. Robbie’s conflicted feelings about Fedaylia and his views regarding religion and marriage add to his difficulties. As the time grows closer for the launch, tensions build into a crescendo.

Since this book is the sixth in the series, I suggest you begin at book one and work your way through to understand the characters and the dynamics behind the series.

The author’s attention to detail both in her characters and in the motivations behind their decisions really makes this series shine. I’m so emotionally invested in the characters that I can’t wait to find out what happens next! Onward and upward to book seven.

MY RATING

*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

Colleen's Book ReviewsRating System

About the Author

Lorinda J. Taylor, author of “The Man Who Found Birds Among the Stars” Series

I’m a retired librarian who worked in academic libraries as a cataloger, and I live in Colorado Springs, CO.  Besides my MLS, I have a BA and an MA in English, and some work toward a Ph.D.  As a child, I was always making up imaginary worlds, but I didn’t start writing fantasy until I read “Lord of the Rings” in 1969 and discovered that even serious scholars like J.R.R. Tolkien can continue to create such worlds far into their adult lives. I never was successful in getting published in those early days, however, and then family considerations forced me to take a hiatus from writing from 1983 until 2000. Since then, I’ve written a novella and several novels, and have begun to self-publish since I doubt that I can live long enough to go the old-fashioned route!

My interests include almost anything literary, scientific, or speculative — science fiction and fantasy, mythology, language (I write conlangs for my books), poetry, cosmology, astrophysics, anthropology, archaeology, entomology, ornithology …

Philosophically, I call myself a spiritual humanist.

Among my favorite authors are Ursula K. LeGuin, Tolkien (of course), Evangeline Walton, and many poets such as Robert Graves and Dylan Thomas.

How to Connect with the Author

Blog – Ruminations of a Remembrancer at http://termitewriter.blogspot.com
(You can find free chapters on her website of Volume I of the Termite Queen).

Twitter – Lorinda J. Taylor @TermiteWriter

Facebook – Lorinda J. Taylor (Termite Writer)

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 If you have your book listed on BookBub, I will add my review there also!  Click HERE to follow me! (Colleen M. Chesebro) Let me know in the comments if you follow me so I can follow you!

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Colleen’s 2020 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 183, #ThemePrompt

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Trimming up the POET TREE for this week – courtesy of Carrot Ranch Literary Community: Read about it HERE

It’s the fourth week of the month! Are you ready for a theme prompt? Pat R. from last month’s challenge picked the theme. You can choose either quote or both if you’d like.

This month’s theme is:

“…In the world’s broad field of battle, In the bivouac of Life,
Be not like dumb, driven cattle! Be a hero in the strife…”

OR


“…Lives of great men all remind us
   We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
   Footprints on the sands of time…”

From:

A Psalm of Life

By American Poet, HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW

What The Heart Of The Young Man Said To The Psalmist

Here is a link to the full poem:
A Psalm of Life by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow | Poetry Foundation

So… what do you do with these quotes? Read the Longfellow quotes and see if they inspire words of your own which then become found poetry. Check out some other ideas in the Found Poetry link for inspiration.

If that doesn’t work, what do you feel after reading these quotes? Are there certain words that resonate with you? Go with your gut! Write some amazing poetry!

On the Monday before the next challenge, I’ll select someone to choose next month’s theme.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet:

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

NEW RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Ehteree, Nonet, and Shadorma.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the monthly schedule listed below:

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma #Gogyohka, #TankaProse

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Now, have fun and write some poetry!


Weekly Poetry Challenge Stars | #PhotoPrompt No. 182

Thanks everyone for the lovely poetry dedicated to my new writing muse, Freyja. I’ve decided to create a collage of poems, along with the author’s names, and a photo of Freyja that I can frame and hang in my creative room. I’ll work on that this week and share it in a post.

Frank J. Tassone provided a photo for this week, but with my crazy schedule this week, I didn’t get it in enough time for the scheduled post. So, the June 30th challenge (the fifth week is usually a specific form) I’ll use Frank’s photo as the prompt. Stay tuned because tomorrow’s prompt will be a theme you won’t want to miss.

I’ve updated the post to include all the participants:

1.Padre8.Elizabeth15.Vashti Quiroz- Vega
2.Kim9.anita dawes16.Kerfe Roig
3.Trent McDonald10.sangeetha17.Sally Cronin
4.Jules11.kittysverses18.Linda Lee Lyberg
5.Ritu Bhathal12.Jude19.Pat R.

I loved all of your poetry this week. Sally Cronin’s Etheree, “The Wise Woman’s Apprentice,” stole my heart.

Congratulations, Sally Cronin, it’s your turn to pick the photo for next month’s PhotoPrompt challenge. Please Email me your choice at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com before next month’s challenge.

Image by Huda Nur from Pixabay

The Wise Woman’s Apprentice

This
tiny
and fluffy
bundle of love
has a destiny
about to be fulfilled
in the most glorious way
as she is inducted into
the magical world of enchantment
of being a wise woman’s apprentice

©2020 Sally Cronin

Freyja commandeered a desk shelf!

See you tomorrow for the new challenge!

COLLEEN’S 2020 #BOOK #REVIEWS – “Moses, the Singer,” BY AUTHOR, Mark W. Sasse, @sassevn

Featuring Your Next Weekend Read!

About this Book

A talented group of teen musicians. A stateless old man living on the margins of society. What do they have in common? Humanity and sweet music.

Will, Sanchez, Song-Yi, and Stephanie attend an American international school on the island of Penang, Malaysia. But at night, they are a talented band of musicians striving to win their school’s talent show, so they can further their dreams of becoming professional musicians. 

Musa “Moses” Marbun has been without a country for forty-six years. The crippled and destitute rickshaw driver pedals tourists through the quaint streets of Penang’s capital city to meet his daily needs.

One day when downtown, Song-Yi witnesses Musa being beaten on a sidewalk for a theft he didn’t commit. As she intervenes on his behalf, an unlikely friendship ensues, which puts the band on a collision course with musical destiny while Musa hopes to end his decades long journey through the wilderness by confronting his past.

Introducing the Band:
Song-Yi, lead singer
Will, guitarist & composer
Sanchez, bass guitarist
Stephanie, percussionist
Moses the Singer

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MY RECOMMENDATION

I’ve been a fan of Mark Sasse’s books for around six years, now. What makes his writing most memorable is how his characters often require lessons to learn and various problems to overcome before they reach redemption. Many of his stories take place in or around Penang, Malaysia where Sasse taught school, which gives his stories a unique Asian flair.

“Moses, the Singer” tells the story of a group of teen musicians who have one goal, and that is to win the school talent contest. Will, Sanchez, Song-Yi, and Stephanie are your typical musical teens with dreams of becoming professional musicians.

Each of these teen characters has well-defined personalities you will remember long after finishing the read. Will, the guitarist, is the one whose type A personality brings them all together. Sanchez, Will’s best friend, plays bass. Song-Yi steals the show with her tender heart and spectacular voice. Stephanie rounds out the group as the youngest and the drummer.

As the teen’s story unwinds, we also meet Musa “Moses” Marbun, a crippled and destitute rickshaw driver who pedals tourists through the streets of Penang’s capital city as he tries to survive.

A chance encounter brings all of them together and Song-Yi intercedes on Musa’s behalf. Little do the teens realize the impact that the old man will have on their life, and vice versa. Will’s family welcomes Musa into their home and hearts. What transpires is the story of a family who surrounds each other with love and support.

I read this YA book while in lockdown mode from the coronavirus pandemic. It was a joy to escape into a story where wonderful things happened to the underdog for a change.

Musa’s life story is heart wrenching. Sometimes the kindest of souls endures the most pain. Like Musa, I spent some time being thankful for my own life experiences and lessons.

If you’re looking for a feel-good read that will help you believe in humanity once again, make “Moses, the Singer,” that book.

Many thanks to the author and Book Sirens for the advanced reader’s copy of this book, which I received for free. I wrote this review voluntarily because I enjoyed the read.

MY RATING

*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

Colleen's Book ReviewsRating System

About the Author

Mark W Sasse is a novelist and award-winning playwright and director. He vacillates on a daily basis between which genre of writing he enjoys the most. Luckily, he doesn’t have to choose! Sasse’s novels have been featured on curated sites such as Bookbub and Noisetrade, and his plays have been produced in New York, Penang, Kuala Lumpur, and Sydney, Australia, among other places. His play “The Last Bastion” earned him the 2018 Greywood Arts Winter Writing Residency in Ireland. He is also a three-time winner of the Best Script Award at the Penang Short & Sweet Theatre Festival. His plays have won multiple other awards such as Best Overall Performance and Audience Choice Award. He won the Festival Director’s Award at the 2016 festival. 

Sasse’s interests cast a wide net – from politics to literature – from culture and language – from history and religion, making his writing infused with the unexpected as he seeks to tell authentic and engaging stories about people from all walks of life. His writing is straightforward and accessible to all, especially those who enjoy a page-turning good story injected with doses of history, adventure, Asian culture, and unexpected humor. 

After being an adamant standalone novel advocate, he’s changed his tune and is working on the epic Forgotten Child Trilogy, which the final book released in March 2019. He finally found the story that required more than one book, and he had a blast writing it. It’s a crazy mix of magical realism, history, and time travel. 

As for his plays, he’s fond of both the short play (10 minutes or less) and full-length formats. From 2011-2017 he wrote for and directed the drama ensemble The RLT Players, a passionate group of dramatic storytellers who specialize in the short play format. In September 2016, his experimental theatre piece “How to Build a Dictator” was featured as part of Penangpac’s Black Box Experiments series. His goal is to have it go into full production somewhere in the world. Any takers? 

He currently teaches drama in Saudi Arabia. 

HOW DID HE FINALLY GET HIMSELF WRITING?

Sasse remembers writing his first play when he was about thirteen. It was about Queen Esther and the only person he ever showed that play to was his mother. In college, he wrote lots of poetry, even love poetry for a certain girl. But once he graduated, his writing confidence was shattered, so he gave it up for the next twenty years. He doesn’t recommend doing that! He went to China to teach English in 1992 and eventually moved to Vietnam to do the same in 1994, shortly after the U.S. lifted the embargo against their former enemy. He lived in the exotic Vietnamese culture with his family for nearly ten years. After many life-changing experiences, Sasse’s new-found taste for history sent him back to school to pick-up a second Master’s degree, this one in Humanities. This led to a shift from teaching English to history as he moved to Malaysia in 2006. Little did he know, however, that all of this was building up to another major shift which would get him back to writing. 

On a whim in 2007, he embarked on a collaborative project with a group of students to write and produce a play, resulting in the original stage play “Monkey Love Potion.” It was such a fun and rewarding experience that he decided to try it again the following year. Before he knew it, he was hooked and that was the beginning of his love affair with live theatre. After writing and successfully producing four original full-length scripts, he finally got the nerve to try his hand once again at a hidden desire which had defeated him many times over the years – novel writing.

In the summer of 2011, he embarked on the journey of writing his first novel. His greatest worry was reaching the magical 50,000 word mark, so he could officially call himself a novelist. When the story, “Beauty Rising,” clocked in at over 60,000 words, he was shocked and happy. But not content. He didn’t know what to do with the novel, and he convinced himself that it would sit idle until he wrote a second novel. He hated hearing the words “one-hit wonder” echo in his head. So in the summer of 2012, he wrote “The Recluse Storyteller.” 

Feeling a little more confident, he decided to focus on exposing his work to the public in order to receive some feedback. In December 2012, he independently published “Beauty Rising.” When the first review from an online book reviewer was posted and it was over-the-top positive, he was flying high, and if he never wrote another word in his life, he would have been content. But that contentment was not to be. He was now hopelessly hooked on both play writing and novel writing, and he hasn’t looked back since.

He has published eight novels. He is grateful for all the readers who have joined him on this journey of creativity. 

ON A PERSONAL NOTE

Sasse loves to cook everything from pizza to Thai. He’s coached softball or baseball for the past ten years, and he’s been a much too loyal fan of the Pittsburgh Pirates since he was 9 years old–another item he’s hopelessly hooked on. He enjoys travelling, visiting historical sites, and sitting by the beach or other scenic spot with a laptop, an idea, and a lot of time. He has a lovely wife and three wonderful children and one really cool son-in-law – he’s Korean, keeping with the Asian theme of his life. He has an active blog (www.mwsasse.com) where he writes frequently about history, writing, culture, and life. He loves to hear from readers, so he hopes you’ll stop by his site and say “hello.” 

The Complete List of Published Works by Mark W Sasse

NOVELS
The African Connection (The Forgotten Child Book 2) (2018)
A Man too Old for a Place too Far (The Forgotten Child Book 1) (2017)
Which Half David: A Modern-day King David Story (2016)
A Love Story for a Nation (2015)
The Reach of the Banyan Tree (2014)
The Recluse Storyteller (2013)
Beauty Rising (2012)

PLAYS
The Folly of Progress (2017)
The Last Bastion (2017)
How to Build a Dictator (2016)
The Secrets of the Magic Pool (2016)
Grandparents’ War (2013)
Romans on the Couch (2011)

SHORT STORIES
The Hundred Pitch At-Bat (2019)
Jolly Old St. Hick (2018)
Christmas in the Trenches, 1914 (2016)
If Love is a Crime: A Christmas Story (2014)

How to Connect with the Author

BLOG: mwsasse.com

TWITTER: @sassevn

FACEBOOK: Author Mark W Sasse

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 If you have your book listed on BookBub, I will add my review there also!  Click HERE to follow me! (Colleen M. Chesebro) Let me know in the comments if you follow me so I can follow you!

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Colleen’s 2020 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 182 #PhotoPrompt

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

It’s the third week of the month! Time for a #PhotoPrompt! On Wednesday, my new writing muse, Freyja will finally come home. At eight weeks old, I’m sure she will be a lot of fun. To celebrate, I selected the photo for this month’s challenge. This isn’t my little girl, but this kitty looks close enough!

Write your poem using one of the syllabic poetry forms on the cheatsheet below. Don’t forget to add the image credits on your blog. Don’t forget to link the URL of your poem in Mr. Linky. Have fun!

Image by Huda Nur from Pixabay

On the Monday before the next challenge, I will pick a poem from this week’s challenge and share it on my blog. Whoever I pick will choose the photo for next month’s challenge! Email your selection to me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com a week before the challenge. Thank you!

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting blogs and leaving comments. Peer reviews help poets perfect their writing craft. Remember… sharing is caring.

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in the forms defined on the Poetry Challenge Cheatsheet (click the link below):

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE *NEW* RULES

  • Write a poem using a form of your choice: Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Ehteree, Nonet, and Shadorma.
  • Post it on your blog.
  • Include a link back to the challenge in your post. (copy the https:// address of this post into your post).
  • Copy your link into the Mr. Linky below (underlined with a hyperlink).
  • Please click the small checkbox on Mr. Linky about data protection.
  • Read and comment on some of your fellow poets’ work.
  • Like and leave a comment below if you choose to do so.

The screenshot below shows what Mr. Linky looks like inside. Add your name, and the URL of your post. Click the box about the privacy policy (It’s blue). As everyone adds their links to Mr. Linky, you can view the other submissions by clicking on the Mr. Linky link on the challenge post. All the links will show in the order of posting.

Follow the schedule listed below:

Don't forget

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. 

If you add these hashtags to the post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often on Twitter:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Gogyohka, #Tanka, #TankaProse, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

Are you missing my challenges? Search for me in the WordPress Reader or…

Now, have fun and write some poetry!