Colleen’s 2019 #Book #Reviews – “More Glimpses,” by Author, @HughRoberts05

WHAT are you Reading This Weekend?

Title: More Glimpses

Amazon Author Page: Hugh W. Roberts

Formats: Kindle

Genres: Short Stories, Single Author’s Short Stories

In the Author’s Words

Do you believe in fairies at the bottom of the garden? Or know the real truth about what lurks inside every mobile phone? Would you steal items from a blind person, or send your neighbours on a time travelling adventure fraught with danger and menace to save the human race from a bug? How about staying in a sleepy village where many murders have taken place or coming to the aid of royalty while out shopping? 

These are just some of the subjects covered in the second collection of short stories and flash fiction from author and writer, Hugh W. Roberts.

‘More Glimpses’ gives the reader an opportunity to take a peek into the lives of normal, everyday people whose lives are all on a path full of twists, turns and unexpected endings. However, it’s not only about the humans; nothing escapes the extraordinary journeys Hugh has planned for you. If you are a lover of shows such as ‘Black Mirror’ or ‘The Twilight Zone’ then you’re in for another exciting trip in this second collection from Hugh. Come and meet the characters who had no idea their lives were about to be turned upside-down. Enjoy the ride!

What Reader’s Are Saying:

“Hugh W. Roberts is back with More…Glimpses, that is! This is his second collection of short stories showcasing the dark and somewhat twisted mind of humankind. Roberts’ witty imagination, coupled with his love of stories from The Twilight Zone and Outer Limits, crafts 32 more tales of dark humour and hair-raising tales in a variety of genres, some a short read, others a little longer to get your heart racing! In every case, just when you think you’ve got the tale figured out, Roberts drops in a completely unexpected ending that may make you jump, laugh or even ponder your use of technology! The Tunnel, Baby Talk, Floral Hall and The Right Choice were my favourites!” – Terri Webster Schrandt, Writer and Blogger.

MY RECOMMENDATION

Flash fiction and short stories are some of my favorite late night reading. Having read the first book, “Glimpses,” I was thrilled to hear that Hugh Roberts had written a second collection.

What I found between these pages was a wealth of creative and imaginative stories. Roberts is known for his witty endings and his ability to take a mundane event and turn it into something totally unexpected. Some of his stories have a Twilight Zone quality to them that are sure to WOW! Just to be safe, don’t turn out the lights.

A few of my favorites were “The Whistle,” a frightening glance back into time and set in the trenches of WWI. This one tugged at my heart!

“Murder in Evershot,” reads like a Miss Marple suspense from the BBC. The author actually casts himself and family into the plot. Brilliant!

My favorite story was “Fairies at the Bottom of the Garden” (of course). This was the story of Roger, a homophobe who despised his brother in law simply because he was gay. However, the fairies at the bottom of the garden have a surprise in store for Roger. Just goes to show that you should never piss-off the fairies! Never!!

This collection of short stories is the perfect weekend read! Grab your copy today!

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 
5
Reader Engagement: 
5
Reader Enrichment: 
5
Reader Enjoyment: 
5
Overall Rate: 
5 out of 5 Fairies

*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

Colleen's Book ReviewsRating System
Author, Hugh W. Roberts

About the Author

My name is Hugh. I live in the city of Swansea, South Wales, in the United Kingdom.

I’m a passionate blogger and have been blogging since February 2014. My blog covers a wide range of subjects, the most popular of which are my posts on blogging tips. I’ve learned a lot about the world of blogging since I first discovered it. All of the tips and advice I give are free of charge and will cost you nothing apart from, maybe, a little bit of your time.

I have always enjoyed writing, and the fact I suffer from a mild form of dyslexia has not stopped me from enjoying the passion I have for writing.

Now in my fifties, I thought it about time I let my writing become public. Becoming a blogger seemed to be the perfect way for me to do this. Blogging has put me in touch with hundreds of other writers, many of whom have been supportive and helped me with my writing.

I’m a member of the committee of the Bloggers Bash; a group set up to organise annual get-togethers for all bloggers. Held in London, we had our fourth event in May 2018. I’m delighted to say that details of the 2019 Bloggers Bash have now been announced and will take place on Saturday 15th June 2019 in London. 

I lead a happy life and always try to stay positive. I share my life with John, my wonderful civil partner, and our two Welsh Cardigan Corgis, Toby and Austin. 

I write about life because I find it so fascinating. I have many stories to tell, some of which I have started to put into a book. I think my life has been incredible and I want to share it with anyone who wants to listen. I am also an excellent listener, and I love to be interactive with other people. I guess you could say I am a ‘people person’.

You will find some of my short stories and flash fiction on my blog, and I hope you enjoy reading them. Flash Fiction has become a big part of my writing, and I enjoy participating in various writing challenges.

My first collection of short stories is available on Amazon. Glimpses is available as both a paperback and an eBook and contain 28 short stories and flash fiction full of twists, turns, and unexpected endings. The Kindle version is 99p.

My second collection of short stories and flash fiction, More Glimpses, is now available on Amazon.

Follow-me-on-Bookbub-300X121-300x121

 If you have your book listed on BookBub, I will add my review there also! ❤ Click HERE to follow me! (Colleen M. Chesebro) Let me know in the comments if you follow me so that I can follow you!

Are you looking for more great reads? Join author, D.G. Kaye, Sally Cronin, and Colleen Chesebro in our writers group on MeWe.com, The Literary Diva’s Hangout to find book reviews, book promotions, & special deals on books from authors you love. This is a safe site for authors, bloggers, poets, and writers to share their work.

UHTS: SUBMISSION CALL for October 2019 issue of Cattails

SUBMISSION CALL for October 2019 issue of cattails

Submissions for Fall/October issue open: 1st July (midnight) GMT and close: 15th August (midnight) GMT.

Attention POETS: Please read the instructions below carefully so you know how and where to submit your poetry. ❤

***

Please make sure you submit your work to the correct editor. Mike Montreuil is the haibun editor for the October issue and Sonam Chhoki, the April issue. Kala Ramesh is on a sabbatical and Tim Gardiner is the Youth Corner editor for this issue.

1. Send your work, including images for haiga, in the body of an e-mail only – attachments will not be opened. You must include your country, full name, and e-mail address in the body of the e-mail to be considered. For haiga, images should have a resolution of at least 200 dpi and a photo size of at least 1500 px length.

2. We consider only works that have never been previously published elsewhere, either online or in print, (this includes on social media sites, blogs, and websites).

3. We do not consider works submitted elsewhere simultaneously, including to journals or competitions. Failure to comply with this will result in the rejection of a submission.

4. The work presented must be yours exclusively or if it’s a collaboration, all persons involved in the collaboration must be included in the submission. The names of the authors (poet and photographer/artist) must be included in the haiga photograph/artwork.

5. We encourage, but do not require you to submit your works in your native language, along with the English version.

6. You may make one submission per reading period of:
•    Not more than 10 tanka
•    Not more than 12 haiku
•    Not more than 12 senryu
•    Not more than 3 haibun
•    Not more than 3 haiga/tankart

7. What we do not accept:
•    mainstream short form poetry
•    tanka prose
•    sequences of any type
•    linked verse
•    rhymed work
•    books for review

Response Time:
Members of the editorial team will acknowledge your submission within a week of receipt. Final acceptances or rejections will be sent once the final selections are complete. If you happen to experience a delay, please contact the principal editor, Sonam, at allthingshaibun@gmail.com

REMINDER: 
Please send any/all other submissions (within the “body” of an e-mail), with the Subject heading for the appropriate form you are submitting to, in all CAPITAL LETTERS.
Submit your work according to the following genre editors: (see definitions page if you’re unclear about these distinctions)

Tanka Editor: Kathy Kituai, Australia
submittocattails+TANKA@gmail.com with the subject heading: TANKA

Haiku Editor: Geethanjali Rajan, India
submittocattails+HAIKU@gmail.com with the subject heading: HAIKU

Senryu Editor: Gautam Nadkarni, India
submittocattails+SENRYU@gmail.com with the subject heading: SENRYU

Haibun Editor: October Issue: Mike Montreuil, Canada
submittocattails+HAIBUN@gmail.com with the subject heading: HAIBUN

Haibun Editor: April Issue: Sonam Chhoki, Bhutan
submittocattails+HAIBUN@gmail.com with the subject heading: HAIBUN

Haiga/Tankart Editor: Lavana Kray, Romania
submittocattails+HAIGA@gmail.com with the subject heading HAIGA

Youth Corner Editor: Tim Gardiner, UK
submittocattails+YOUTH@gmail.com with the subject heading: YOUTH

Managing Editor: Mike Montreuil, Canada 
submittocattails+TECH@gmail.com with the subject heading: TECH

UHTS Secretary: lliyana Stoyanova
submittocattails+JOIN@gmail.com with the subject heading: JOIN

Copyright Policy: 
All rights revert back to authors upon publication, although credits for having been first-published in cattails (both online and in print), are required, as are credits for any collaboration of any submission. We reserve the right to reprint accepted work in electronic or hard copy form.

by: Iliyana Stoyanova

Click HERE to Join the United Haiku & Tanka Society

NOW… get busy and write some syllabic poetry!!

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 133 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

Here are your two words for this week:

Plan & Spend

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! Except for the first challenge of the month ~ then, the poets get to choose their own words. ❤

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Phoenix: Mountain Standard time, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to cut and paste the poems from the submission form emails into the Recap published on Monday.

The rules are simple

If it’s the first poetry challenge of the month, poets choose their own words. (Synonyms are not necessary). Otherwise, for the rest of the month, I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

After you’ve published your poem on your own blog, copy and paste your poem into the form below. Then, click the SUBMIT button. (WordPress limits me on the title names, so use the Key below to know what to fill in the blanks) This form generates an email to me.

Don’t forget to click SUBMIT.

By participating in this challenge, you agree to allow me to publish your poem in a 2019 PDF collection of poetry if you are selected as the Poet of the Week. This collection will be available in January 2020 as a free download from my site.

Please note: I will not retrieve your poetry from the pingbacks any longer – only from the submission form emails. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap please use the Submission Form. ❤

However, if you can’t get the submission form to work for you, email me at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com. Please list your name, Title & Type of poem, the web address of your poem, and your poem. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge above to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory.

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge Recap No. 132, #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Many thanks to all the participants and thank you for stopping by to enjoy the poetry. Grab a cup of coffee or tea and enjoy!

PLEASE NOTE: Don’t forget to count your syllables. Use this site: howmanysyllables.com. Click on the workshop tab. Then, copy and paste your poem into the box, and click “count syllables” at the bottom.

The Poet of the Week will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do. I look for how closely you followed the specific syllabic form you used, your word and synonym choice, and lastly, your message.

I’m adding an Honorable Mention to the challenge with the intention of spotlighting other poetry that caught my eye. This week, Ethan Dale Eagar’s Haiga, “Varied,” seen below was another stunner. He paints his backgrounds in watercolors and then adds his poetry. Spectacular!

***

This week, I’ve chosen Jane Dougherty as the Poet of the Week along with her poem, “Stream.” Jane wrote a Shadorma poem which is a syllabic form consisting of two six-line stanzas or sestets.

I chose this poem because of Jane’s strong use of descriptive words. This is the perfect example of showing – NOT telling. Each line describes a different aspect of the stream. The brook can be a metaphor for one’s life journey or even more simply, describing a perfect mindful moment in time gazing at a stream.

I do want to draw attention to Jane’s use of punctuation. It is my personal opinion that the punctuation adds depth to this poem. The words don’t run on and I know where to breathe when reading her words.

Creatively, you could leave the punctuation off and allow the words to rumble along just like this stream does over the rocks. That is the beauty of poetry and entirely up to the poet.

Remember, punctuation is a personal choice but if you are going to submit your work for competition purposes, I would observe the rules of the contest. Some will specifically state that they are looking for punctuation. ❤

“Stream”

From its source

stream leaps for the light,

earth-channelled,

sun-yearning.

I taste darkness in its bones,

stars in its glitter.

Rushing wild,

tumbling with a child’s

eagerness

no notion

of when, why, or tomorrow,

pool-plashed, sun-dappled.

© 2019 Jane Dougherty

CONGRATULATIONS! Jane Dougherty Poet of the Week: June 6/18 – 6/23

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR THE POETRY CHALLENGE USING SYNONYMS FOR “Influence & Perception”

“Aware,” #Haiku by Elizabeth

my full awareness
a walk between the roses
transforming my day

***

“Stream,” #Double Shadorma by Jane Dougherty

From its source
stream leaps for the light,
earth-channelled,
sun-yearning.
I taste darkness in its bones,
stars in its glitter.

Rushing wild, 
tumbling with a child’s 
eagerness 
no notion 
of when, why or tomorrow, 
pool-plashed, sun-dappled.

***

“Ya, Think?” #Tanka by Annette Rochelle Aben

The older she got
OPINIONS meant less and less
She turned a deaf ear
Except to those who knew that
MONEY talks and bullshit walks

***

“No, Say!” #Etheree by Willowdot21

I
Have no
Sway over
Nature’s design
The way I see it
Is but my take on things
She will not be persuaded
I understand it is nature’s way
Holding our lives within her tight grasp
As mother her’s is always the last word.

***

“Comfort Zone,” #Tanka by Dorinda Duclos

My dreams to impress,

Became lackluster with age.

Now long forgotten,

Are the mad days of dazzling.

Enlightenment won over. 

***

“Gold,” #Etheree by H. R. R. Gorman

Gold –
Rub it
On your face.
Money’s the best –
Matches all skin tones,
Conceals all blemishes,
Confers impressions of youth.
Trade inner truth for leverage;
Wear your influence with outward pride.
Your gold will wear someone else when you’re gone.

***

“Influence & Perception,” #Etheree by Anita Dawes

My
Knowledge
Is sketchy
Of God more so
Imagine my shock
When I open my mail
An invitation to tea
I have something for you to do
What can I do, that God cannot?
The force of his words was simple, believe…

***

“Life Lessons,” #Haibun #Tanka by Sally Cronin

As I think about my life, I remember fondly those who have taught me important lessons. Their endeavours to mould me into a civilised individual. To domesticate and remove feral inclinations. To instil in me a sense of moral decency. How to enjoy life to its fullest. Imagine my surprise to determine, that the greatest teacher of all was a dog.

Their eyes have evolved
to look deep within our souls;
better to know man.
Little do we comprehend
how much they have to teach us.

***

“Unswayed,” #Tanka by Pat

behind those brown eyes
a sense of knowing – unswayed
by life’s indignities
she holds fast, mind still her own –
matter of independence

***

“Sway,” #Double Etheree by Scott Bailey

All
That I
Survey is
Under my sway
That is what they say
The evidence is slim
So I start to understand
How perfidious is the world
And the darkness begins to seep in
The entropy of hope, and dream slayer
So I must strive to remember the truth
My eyes are my window to the world
What dwells behind them in my world
My kingdom and my domain
So here I shall remain
That is what I say
Under my sway
In my eye
That is
All

***

“To Starboard,” Reversed & Mirrored #Nonet by Kerfe Roig

Sails
fly free,
altered by
what can’t be seen,
by the movements of
the horizon—turning
with the curves formed by shimmered
light—pursuing omens carried
on the wind by the wings of sea drift,
currents that keep changing their mind
like the clouds that decorate
the sky–tides scattering
the waves like fortunes
to be gathered
and harnessed,
blind, to
stars.

***

“A Traveler’s Wisdom,” #quatrain #haibun by Frank J. Tassone

twilight

strawberry moon

above the horizon

I come bearing counsel. Will you hear it? Aye, I’m a traveler, a stranger to you, and a woman, besides. No matter. You can have confidence in what I will tell you. Will you listen?

a flight across the leagues, I see

happenings near and far

to guide your steps upon your path

that lead you toward your star

Yes, it’s a fine thing, to have vision. If you don’t know where you going, how will you know when you get there? Open your eyes, then, and see what there is to see. Not what you want to see, but what is. Because you’ve been stumbling in the dark of your own making too long, haven’t you?

strawberry moon

cast by engulfing clouds

fresh shadows

Now, now, don’t walk away, just yet. Take no offense. You haven’t heard the last of my counsel, have you?

the heights and depths I fly to view

the actions all may take

through insight into what is true

your future can you make

If only life were about the knowing, right? Alas, if we are to truly live, we must act. Or not. And only when we make such choices with our vision in mind can we forge our path with confidence. Not certainty, confidence. Because you’ve blundered about questing for guarantees, have you not?

There, you’ve heard my counsel. Do with it what you like.

fresh shadows

an owl’s flight caught

in moonlight

(Quatrain defined: A quatrain is a type of stanza, or a complete poem, consisting of four lines).

***

“Influence & Perception,” #Tanka by Marjorie Mallon

The pressure’s growing

To find a perfect venue

A decision soon

Be it big, or small in size

Carry on… up the pub dears!

***

“Through My Open Window,” Double #Etheree by Linda Lee Lyberg

Sun 
breaking 
through stormy 
clouds drifting by 
as trees sway in the 
summer breeze, a feeling 
rushes in when the sweet song 
of the mockingbird floats on air 
Through my open window, I recall 
as tears fall those first beautiful moments 
when our eyes met, and we fell into love 
finding our home, never to wander 
far from one another again 
where our souls belong, entwined 
weaving a love so strong 
with tendrils that cling 
and dreams that bind 
forever 
our two 
hearts.

***

Ethan Dale Eagar

“Varied,” #Haiga by Ethan Dale Eagar

***

“Opinions, Not Facts,” Double #Tanka by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

When your soul is bared

the judgment of others is

so often unfair.

Don’t let their opinions

control the way you reason.

You’re criticized by

what makes you unique––

opinions, not facts. 

You know you’re doing something

right when people are talking.

***

“Planting Seeds,” #Tanka by John W. Leys

Consciousness causes
Curiosity to stir
Observing begins
Accumulating knowledge
Seeds of wisdom are planted

***

“Imprinted,” Haiku by Merril D. Smith

Imprinted at birth,

visions of beaks and feathers

sail on river breeze

***

“Influence & Perception,” #Tanka by Ritu

Constantly aware 
The impact I have on kids 
Feeding their knowledge 
The power of a teacher 
Helping children understand 

***

“Influence & Perception,” #Tanka by Bobby Fairfield

Fingers on the glass

without any persuasion

can provide insight,

with ambiguous answers

to all the sitter’s questions

***

“Wasps,” #Tanka by DJ Ranch

wasps enticing thought
I study their diligence
thunder rumbles long
earthy scent of petrichor
settles me into the night

***

“Embrace Change,” #Haibun #Haiku by Colleen Chesebro

Beneath a sapphire sky, our Jeep cruised along the road toward home. The desert shimmered in the heat and ribbons of light danced above the asphalt reflecting a myriad of rainbow tints. The air conditioner blasted away, struggling to erase the heat of the day.

“Look,” said my husband, pointing to the left side of the road. He slowed the vehicle and we gawped, mesmerized by a bit of beige colored fur scurrying across the road.

“A coyote,” I stammered. “I’ve never seen one in their natural setting.”

Upon reaching the other side of the road, the coyote, as if hearing the awe in my voice, paused and looked over his shoulder. Our eyes met, and a feeling of mutual understanding passed between us. My new friend pulled back his lips in a tight grin.

Approach a balance-
between wisdom and pleasure.
You must change your ways!

Coyote spoke with the foresight of a spirit animal. But what about Crow? Certainly, I could have two animal totems, I reasoned. Suddenly, it all began to make sense. Crow had brought me wisdom and now, Coyote had given me the strength to change.

***

This week, I shared links on how to write Haiku in English. Take some time and refresh your memories.

Don’s FORGET!! The UHTS “Fleeting Words” Tanka Competition is On!

GENERAL: Please email your submissions in English in the body of an email (only) directly to Marianna.Monaco@gmail.com, with the words “UHTS “Fleeting Words” contest” in the subject header, and include your name, country, and email address.

Do “not” use the cattails Submissions guidelines for contests.

Submission Period and Deadline: May 1-August 15 of each year.

SUBMISSIONS: There is a 10 poem limit on the number of submissions. If more than 10 poems are submitted, only the first 10 poems will be entered. Entries must be the original work of the author, be previously unpublished and not under consideration elsewhere for the entire time period it takes to complete the judging. If a submitter discovers after the fact that a poem has already been published, let us know and we will pull the poem from the contest. No revisions or replacements will be accepted. This contest is not themed and is open to all age groups worldwide.

FORMATTING: If a poem is submitted in more than one language, we will be delighted. Please put the poem in English first, and then below that, put the poem in the other language. (Do not put the poems side by side). This will greatly facilitate the recording of your poems by the contest coordinator. If you have any problems sending your submissions by email, please let our contest coordinator know.

NOTIFICATION: The winners (only) will be notified. If you do not hear anything back from us by October 1, your entries are automatically free for you to submit elsewhere.

How to Write a Haiku Poem

It’s always good to go back to the basics and refresh our memories about the various syllabic poetry forms we use in our weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge. Today, let’s review how to write a Haiku. Here are a few links for you to read. Enjoy! ~Colleen~

***

Haiku is an ancient form of poetry invented in Japan. People focus on the syllable counts, but that’s just the basics. Here’s how to write a haiku poem.

Source: How to Write a Haiku Poem

Source: How to Write a Haiku in 4 Easy Steps

Source: How to Write a Haiku Poem: Haiku Examples and Tips

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 132 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

Here are your two words for this week:

Influence & Perception

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! Except for the first challenge of the month ~ then, the poets get to choose their own words. ❤

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Pay attention to your punctuation! That is part of writing good poetry.

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Phoenix Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to cut and paste the poems from the submission form emails into the Recap published on Monday.

The rules are simple

If it’s the first poetry challenge of the month, poets choose their own words. (Synonyms are not necessary). Otherwise, for the rest of the month, I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

After you’ve published your poem on your own blog, copy and paste your poem into the form below. Then, click the SUBMIT button. (WordPress limits me on the title names, so use the Key below to know what to fill in the blanks) This form generates an email to me.

Don’t forget to click SUBMIT.

By participating in this challenge, you agree to allow me to publish your poem in a 2019 PDF collection of poetry if you are selected as the Poet of the Week. This collection will be available in January 2020 as a free download from my site.

Please note: I will not retrieve your poetry from the pingbacks any longer – only from the submission form emails. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap please use the Submission Form. ❤

However, if you can’t get the submission form to work for you, email me at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com. Please list your name, Title & Type of poem, the web address of your poem, and your poem. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Have fun and write some poetry!

Punctuation in Poetry – Should we do it?

The most important thing you can learn about writing poetry is to add punctuation, especially if you are going to enter your poems into contests like I suggested in this post: https://colleenchesebro.com/2019/06/16/the-united-haiku-tanka-society-uhts-poetry-contest-information/. Join UHTS HERE.

We’re all familiar with this example:

Lets eat Grandma!

OR:

Let’s eat, Grandma.

When you read the above sentences, the punctuation changes the meaning. The same punctuation rules also apply to poetry.

There are 4 main types of possible punctuation in poems. I’m not an expert in this field, merely a student myself. I searched for information on punctuation usage in poetry and this great article from LinkedIn came up. I’ve shared some of it below.

Syllabic poetry uses many of these same types of punctuation:

“Punctuation in poetry is similar to punctuation in prose and serves almost the same purpose as bar lines in music without which the words and notes won’t flow all together. In order words, punctuation assists in organizing your words into discernible verses:

1) encapsulates thoughts and ideas

2) aids in coherence and the presentation of meaning

3) signals when and where to breathe (very important)

Interestingly, many poets use punctuation marks without knowing why they used them; others just write their verses without using any marks at all, not deliberately, just because they do not know how and where to use them. A third group of poet’s place punctuation arbitrarily, without realizing that punctuation actually aid the readers’ interpretation and also determines his/her breathe pauses.

The fact is that the punctuation marks thrown in affect the reader’s pace, understanding, eye movement and perception.

Before we go too far, let’s talk about the TYPES OF VERSES, determined by the POSITION of the punctuation they contain:  

End-stopped line – when punctuation occurs at the end of a line/verse, allowing the reader to pause before moving on to the next verse

Run-on line/Enjambment – when there is no punctuation at the end of the line and/or the idea expressed in the verse is continued in the next  

Caesura – when a punctuation mark comes within the line itself.

Please click the LinkedIn link below to read the explanations in this post. (They won’t copy over to WP).

Kukogho Iruesiri Samson Communications || Publishing ||Administration on LinkedIn shares his thoughts on punctuation use when writing poetry LinkedIn.com

Grammar rules add structure to your poetry. Yet, some of you will say that it disrupts your creativity. The famous Poet, EE Cummings refused to use punctuation and didn’t capitalize either, giving the proverbial finger to the rules.

Here’s what I think, and feel free to disagree. We are all students in writing poetry. If it goes on my blog or in one of my books, I’m going to use punctuation. Not only does that help my reader understand my words and meaning, but it also gets me into the practice of being consistent with my writing. NOT all poetry needs punctuation. Some poetry expresses more meaning without punctuation. Use your best judgment.

Most poetry contests will judge the structure and form that you use, your words, your punctuation, and the meaning. If you learn how to create your poetry using the rules, you will soon have plenty of poems ready to submit to contests. Some of these contests have cash prizes, but not all.

In the latest Issue of Seedpods, the UHTS e-newsletter, President Alan Summers shares some thoughts and a few of the award-winning poems.

Before I hand over to our incredible judges, just a few words from me, as a way of thanks and appreciation to our poets who were placed in this competition.

I just can’t help but acknowledge each placed haiku and senryu, and how well-crafted with thought, care, insight, consideration, and skill they all were, thank you!

Haiku and senryu require decisions of what is the strongest line, be it the opening or closing line. How does the placement of sometimes the ‘hidden’ stronger line do, and achieve, and does an opening line make the closing line work even more for the entire poem? We can often focus on just how the last line is a surprise, a “reveal,” or denouement, but each line has its part to play.  Sometimes the overlooked line is the middle line, but that too plays its part to support the power of the opening and closing lines of the three-line haiku (the most common, but not exclusive approach to this short verse). Each line plays a part of a bridge, and the middle line is the vehicle to get you to leave one ‘side’ to reach the ‘other side’. Through my own and the judges’ commentaries let’s enjoy and appreciate how each poet approaches the art of haiku and senryu.

Indra Neil Mekala’s verse might just start with one single word in the first line but for me it packs a punch and a whole vehicle of emotions, from joy and hope to fear and trepidation. The use of the comma adds that other side of joy and hope, and of concern that doesn’t go until the birth. The last line is heartwarming and without any saccharine. We humans really are of one color, and babies are babies, they are precious regardless. Great crafting of this verse throughout.

Rajan’s dark side of the moon verse carries hope in a world that appears as dark as the unseen side of the moon, which is shaking and shrinking as we speak, as reported by NASA recently. A  warm poem for a world that can appear cold. The opening line really works with the phrase, honing it back from being sentimental.

From a literal situation, with all the earthquakes and other catastrophes, and the sad effect of a long distance relationship I feel sad that Jay shows the “growing apart” feature of a relationship. I can only hope it’s really just a fault in the technical connection, and not the two people really distancing themselves from each other.

Thank you Pragya! I still remember, in awe, the vast night skies of Queensland, and the Mars-like sky of the Northern Territory, in Australia. One night I felt I might start driving skywards, as the stars seemed to form a ramp at the top of an incline. Lots of layers for me to dive into!

Already, just by the opening line, Andre’s verse feels evocative, gathered in pace by the second line, delivering us not just to quinces, but the heat and comfort of poaching them. Thank you quinces!

I love the unusual treatment of the opening line from Margo, and whether you consider this a haiku, or a senryu, it works for me, and already evokes a lot of feeling. A fun second line, or is it? Then the ‘reveal’ as (phew) it’s the birds feeding, but reminding us, we can go quickly out of favor.

Mark has a real knack with haiku that include rain, and here he deftly combines rain and thunder with horses real and/or imaginary. Superbly atmospheric.

Alan Summers

 President, United Haiku and Tanka Society

Below, you will find the first, second, and third place winners. The judges have left comments which will help us learn from their decisions. Learn how to write a HAIKU HERE. If you can write a Haiku, you can write all the rest of the forms.

2019 UHTS “AHA” Haiku Contest Results
 

1st Place
Indra Neil Mekala, India

ultrasound—
for now, every baby
has the same color

A profound truth simply told. A universal truth reflected in the now ordinary experience of a mother looking at her growing fetus by way of an ultrasound. There is no editorializing here. Instead the basic reality of the real world; the natural world. The connection that we all share.
                                                                                    – Jeannie Martin

Sometimes the best haiku are simple observations, which can lead to deeper meanings upon additional re-reads.  Here the lack of color in an ultrasound is effectively contrasted with our racially divisive society, emphasizing the innocence of an unborn baby before it is touched by prejudices and hatred that exist in this world.  And, on a deeper level, after several re-reads, knowing that our eyes see via refraction (also responsible for splitting white light into a spectrum of colors) where an ultrasound produces images from sound waves, essentially “color blind,” but yet hospitals in the United States fail black women with a pregnancy mortality rate 3-4 times the rate of their white counterparts.  The ultrasound can eliminate subconscious prejudice, and yet the baby may still be affected by it.
                                                                                    –  Deborah P Kolodji

2nd Place
Rajan, India


dark side of the moon . . .
everything the heart
still carries

The dark side of the moon, or the far side of the moon, is the one that always faces away from the earth, the part that we cannot see in our night sky.  Likewise, it is impossible to see into the heart of another and this somehow makes those things we carry in our hearts even more precious and real.   Even if we never see the dark side of the moon, it still rotates around us and remains with us.  Likewise, those things we cherish in our hearts remain with us.  This juxtaposition is very effective.

                                    – Deborah P Kolodji

3rd Place
Jay Friedenberg, USA


continental drift
the growing distance
in your voice

Continental drift: we do not notice the subtle movement of the ground beneath us, but it is very real. This haiku says a great deal in a few words and yet also leaves the details and the drama up to the reader’s personal reflection. Is this a romance? Or is it a long distance friendship grown cold? What we do know is the voice, the distant, perhaps faint voice that now sounds far away, tells it all. The balance of the first and the last words conveys the heaviness of the poem. In this, a certain symmetry is created that also leaves us slightly out of balance.

                                                            -Jeannie Martin

Now, get busy and write some syllabic poetry! Start with a Haiku and see where it leads you!

Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge Recap No. 131, #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Join us every Tuesday for Tanka Tuesday!

First, before we begin, I want to thank all of my poetic friends for their continued support and all the lovely poetry that has been written this week. I’ve missed you all!

When I began this poetry challenge a few years ago, I did it with the intention of sharing my love for syllabic poetry. I had no idea that this challenge would prove to be so fulfilling for me and so many others. I want to thank you all for your participation and friendship. To belong to such a talented group of poets is beyond amazing! Thank you. ❤

My dining room is finished!

WordPress has not made it easy for me to share your poetry. Text didn’t want to center on images and it was frustrating to fight the editor. If your poem is double spaced or written in header fonts – each line becomes a separate block and must be worked with separately on this recap post. I don’t want to use the “verse” block because it doesn’t do well accommodating the Haibun prose. I had a hard time adding link-backs to your poetry, as well. At a minimum, it took two tries for each poem to get the editor to accept the link. As usual with WordPress, we are still a work in progress. ❤

The Poet of the Week will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do.

This week, I’ve chosen MJ Mallon as the Poet of the Week with her Tanka, “Field of Bright Tulips.” Tanka poetry is one of my most favorite forms. Written in the first person, Tankas give the reader an intimate look at the poet’s thoughts, which MJ’s poem clearly did.

I also like the mental imagery of a field of tulips which could be a metaphor for anyone’s happy place. This is a great way to show and NOT tell.

Fields of Bright Tulips,” by MJ Mallon

With every dawn

Inspiration finds a way

To bloom in choice words

Until exhausted, I dream

Fields of bright tulips.

© 2019 MJ Mallon

CONGRATULATIONS, MJ Mallon – Poet of the Week: 6/11 – 6/16.

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR THE POETRY CHALLENGE USING SYNONYMS FOR “Beginning & Consume.”


“Hurrying Human Tides,” #Cinquain by  Vashti Quiroz-Vega

New York

The Big Apple

Fast walkers devour streets

My leisurely Miami pace

annoys

***

“Tethered,” #Etheree by Violet Lentz

No
longer
ate up by
youths hormonal
cocktail, the pieces
of me I had always
accepted as missing, or
broken are forming a core. a
root system that seeks to tether me
to a life I was once ready to leave.

***

“Unfolding,” #Haibun #Haiku by D. Avery

I witnessed a bold emergence, a radicle reaching for earth; the primary root. It took hold, the hypocotyl unfolding, the cotyledons sloughing off the protective seed coat, the cotyledons’ energy expended as the embryonic leaves turned towards the sun. The sun was then devoured, absorbed, transmuted, until, miraculously, it took the form of a tree, in the spot where once I saw this bold emergence from a winged seed. 

disappearances 
materializations
miracles unfold

***

“#Haiku on Time,” by John W. Leys

Time devours all
From the roots to the branches
Nothing can escape

***

“Tanka Tuesday, #Tanka by Chelsea Ann Owens

My paper curls

‘Round rising action arc-lines

Too green, yet, to burn

Too fresh for first-part fires

They smolder, forever young.

***

“Beginning & Consume,” #Tanka by Jane Dougherty

rising sun consumes 
tender shadows of the night
fierce fireball 
live-giver and taker lights 
our beginning and our end

***

“Devourer Of Planets,” #Senryu by The Dark Netizen

Once I Start Eating,
I Don’t Stop Till I Devour
The Entire Planet…

***

“Preparations,” #Tanka by H. R. R. Gorman

My heart palpitates –
My work in its inception 
Is long and risky.
My anxiety depletes,
But my success can restore.

***

“In the Beginning,” #Nonet by WillowDot21

When it all started there were just two
All sparkly, wonderful and new.
They had eyes for each other
Such joys to discover
Snake then wriggled in
Try this apple
It’s good, she
Ate, too
Late.

***

“Time”, #ethree, #double-ethree by Trent McDonald

Dawn!
A start
So much hope!
The day unfolds
Now we have our chance
The future lies ahead
With a smile, we move forward
Knowing we have time to achieve
No worries since we are at the start
Fulfill our dreams in that infinite day
We have used up too much time already!
What, it can’t be past noon already….
We must hurry and finish up
Those grains of sand drain away
The clock devours the day
Where does the time go?
We just started!
No more time
Evening
Dusk

***

“Waiting,” #Tanka by Sue Vincent

Summer devours spring

A passionate appetite

Fallen petals mourn

In the heart of yesterday

Tomorrow awaits its birth

***

“Melting Pot of Love,” #Triple-Shadorma by Linda Lee Lyberg

Creation-
peace as the canvas
on which to
paint a fresh
new beginning of hope and
joy for all mankind

Devour the
lush watercolors
a landscape
a landslide
of unconditional love
flooding the planet

Bright rainbows
love is love is love
for others
for brothers
for sisters in all colors
melting pot of LOVE.

***

“Make-Believe,” #Tanka by Ethan Dale Eagar

Genesis of dreams 
Is she really make-believe?
I tremble to think
Her cruel tricks devour me
Augmenting reality

***

“Fields of Bright Tulips,” #Tanka by MJ Mallon

With every dawn

Inspiration finds a way

To bloom in choice words

Until exhausted, I dream

Fields of bright tulips

***

“Queso,” #Tanka by Donna Matthews

you alone the source
of dietary delight
my stomach growling
eager taste buds sing your praise 
anxious to devour queso

***

“Dawn,” #Etheree by Merril D. Smith

Dawn,

blushing

awakens–

pitcher in hand,

she waters with dew

the earth as she rises,

leading the way for the sun–

the god in his chariot glides–

swallowing night in his golden blaze.

But to where does rosy-fingered dawn fly?

On feathered wings, she dances with the stars,

creates new life with passionate embrace,

cares for her incandescent steeds,

(though careless with her lovers)

she beckons and woos, then

sleeps to rise again–

saffron-robed and

radiant–

bringing

light.

***

“distances” #shadorma by Kerfe Roig

stand on the
threshold or vanish
into the
outer edge–
wholly alive, everywhere
at once, endlessly

***

“Shero,” #Tanka by Annette Rochelle Aben

It took a moment

For the truth to DAWN on her

She was finally safe

She had not WASTED her time

She was just finding her strength

***

“Old Soldiers,” #Double-Etheree by Sally Cronin

Old
soldiers
pack away
their uniforms
place treasured medals
in velvet-lined cases
proud reminders of their youth
and the onset of the battle
when fear threatened to devour them
as comrades fell to the sand at their side
Many a tear will roll down wizened cheeks
now this anniversary has passed
and although khaki and merits
are returned to their boxes
the memories remain
etched upon their hearts
their minds and dreams
where comrades
haunt them
still.

***

“Crossing the Bridge,” #TankaProse by Frank J. Tassone

Dawn

and the threshold awaits

that crossing

all the preparation

and still the fear

The bridge awaits. The River, so placid today, indifferently reflects the rising arc of the joined stones. I shudder before the threshold. The bystanders at my back stand their ground. This is my journey, to commence with my first step upon the stones.

What will I find on the other side? What will any of us? The bridge awaits, but I can wait no more.

The first step falls.

still morning air

another slice of life

to devour

crossing the ultimate

threshold, at last

***

“Now to Grow,” #Tanka by Robbie Cheadle

A decision made

releases my captive mind

and eradicates

unproductive reflections

initiating new growth

***

“Breaking Bonds,” #Tanka by Robbie Cheadle

Finding happiness

may require breaking the bonds

that devour freedom

allowing for conception

of spirit releasing plans

***

“The Truth Will Set You Free,” #Double-Reverse-Etheree, by Debby Gies

It has been said – the truth will set us free

It hides in plain sight in silent voice

Our eyes divulge the unspoken

Peeking out behind our tears

Burning deep in our souls

Distorted by lies

Etched in hearts

Disguised in hate

Speak now

Hope

Not lost

Light not dark

Guides us to truth

The awakening

Beckons ears to listen

No longer time for silence

Time to evolve and comprehend

Silence and hatred won’t save the world

Take heed, lest we’re devoured by untruth

***

“Beginning & Consume,” #Etheree by Ritu

At
The start
Of the year
All I wanted
Was peace and quiet
They listened and left me
At first, I revelled in it
Then the loneliness slowly came
The silence ate away at my mind
I begged them to come back, but no one came

***

“Cosmic Messages,” A Haibun/Tanka by Colleen M. Chesebro

This morning, as the sun warmed my back, I gazed at the stark beauty of the Sonoran desert spread before me. Thick-trunked Saguaro cactus spread their arms to the sapphire sky as if showing gratitude for another day of being.

Verdant green Palo Verde trees filled with saffron blossoms waved to me in the breeze, welcoming me to my new home. I stood in awe, dumbfounded at how I had stumbled into my personal Shangri-la.

My moving quest dawned
with gnawing apprehension,
my plans doomed to fail.
Yet, the universe led me
to a rewarding finish.

In due course, I surmised, when the cosmos speak… it is always wise to listen. Welcome home.

***

Are you looking for more writing/poetry/photography challenges?

H.R.R. Gorman has created a comprehensive list on his blog. Click HERE to learn more. ❤

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 131 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

Here are your two words for this week:

Beginning & Consume

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! Except for the first challenge of the month ~ then, the poets get to choose their own words. ❤

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Phoenix, AZ time, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to cut and paste the poems from the submission form emails into the Recap published on Monday.

The rules are simple

If it’s the first poetry challenge of the month, poets choose their own words. (Synonyms are not necessary). Otherwise, for the rest of the month, I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

After you’ve published your poem on your own blog, copy and paste your poem into the form below. Then, click the SUBMIT button. (WordPress limits me on the title names, so use the Key below to know what to fill in the blanks) This form generates an email to me.

Don’t forget to click SUBMIT.

By participating in this challenge, you agree to allow me to publish your poem in a 2019 PDF collection of poetry if you are selected as the Poet of the Week. This collection will be available in January 2020 as a free download from my site.

Please note: I will not retrieve your poetry from the pingbacks any longer – only from the submission form emails. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap please use the Submission Form. ❤

However, if you can’t get the submission form to work for you, email me at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com. Please list your name, Title & Type of poem, the web address of your poem, and your poem. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Have fun and write some poetry!