The Rodeo is Coming! Are YOU Ready to Write?

From Charli Mills at the Carrot Ranch Literary Community:

“Writers have to have the grit of a buckaroo who carries his saddle between rodeos. Writers have to have the tenacity to not quit the longest ride they’ll ever have chasing publication the way bull-riders chase those perfect 8-seconds. Writers have to be willing to take down the big goats.

That’s why we rodeo at Carrot Ranch. All year we practice the literary art form of flash fiction in 99 words, no more, no less. So once a year we put those skills and safe writes to the test. We rodeo.

A rodeo is a contest in which writers show their skills with the flash fiction form. It’s an exciting break from the weekly challenges and an opportunity to compete. Like a cowboy rodeo, this event includes different contest categories to show off a variety of skills. The 2018 Flash Fiction Rodeo runs October 1-31.

Contestants will get to wrangle tight word constraints, tell emotive, compelling and surprising stories, and write across genres and audiences. Some contests will call for specific craft skills, like using dialog to carry a story. Other contests will add twists to the prompts.

The following Rodeo Leaders return to stimulate your writing this October: Geoff Le PardIrene WatersSherri MatthewsNorah Colvin, and D. Avery. Over the next five weeks, each leader will introduce you to their contest, judges, and tips for competing. Each contest comes with a top prize for the winner: $25.”

Click the link below to learn more. This is one contest you will not want to miss!

https://carrotranch.com/2018/08/22/are-you-ready-to-rodeo/

GiddyUP See you THERE!

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 99, “Change & Defy,” #SynonymsOnly

tanka tuesday fall

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.


 

PLEASE NOTE: This challenge is for Tanka, Haiku, Senryu, Haibun, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

 

WootHELP ME grow this challenge. Please SHARE, or use PRESS THIS. ❤ Thank you.


Opportunities for Poets

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Radarpoetry.com welcomes unsolicited submissions of poems during our reading period of October 1 through June 30.  

During the months of July, August, and September, we read and administer the Coniston Prize and are open to prize submissions only.  Please see the contest page for details.

Guidelines

Please read the guidelines carefully as they have recently been updated.

We recommend you read our issues to get a sense of our aesthetic before sending your workWe only accept poems only through our submissions managerPoems sent by email will be deleted.

Submit 3-5 original, previously unpublished poems in a single document. We read blind, so please ensure there is no identifying information on the document that contains your poems. You should include a cover letter and a brief bio in the comments boxWe welcome translations as long as all necessary rights have been secured by the translator.

We accept simultaneous submissions and ask that you notify us right away if your work has been accepted elsewhere. For partial withdrawals, simply add a note to your entry on Submittable. We do not accept multiple submissions.

We respond to each submission within a month, and often much sooner than that. After 30 days have passed, feel free to query us. You can also report and track your submission through Duotrope. Unless you are specifically invited to send more work, please wait 6 months after before submitting again.

Former contributors should wait one calendar year after the publication of their poems before submitting again.

We secure first serial rights for poems we publish. Upon publication, all rights revert to the author. We are proud to nominate our contributors for major awards including the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. We ask that all contributors cite Radar Poetry should their poems be published elsewhere in the future.

We look forward to reading your work!

~*~

Thrushpoetryjournal.com – a journal of poetry that will appear 6 times a year. ( January, March, May, July, September, and November)

We believe in showcasing the best work we receive. We will present a select number of poems per edition.

Submissions are now open. We read submissions on a rolling basis. We are not a paying market.

Submit previously unpublished work only. If you are sending us work that appears on your website, blog, or a self-publishing site, please remove it prior to submitting to us. Send us no more than three poems, pasted in the body of an email, preceded by a cover letter. If your poem requires special formatting, you may then, and please only then, also include an attachment.

Please indicate “POETRY SUBMISSION” on your subject line. Submissions without “Poetry Submission” in the subject line will be deleted unread.

Include a bio (all bios are subject to editing). Also include a URL to your blog or website, if applicable. Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but not preferred. If your work is accepted elsewhere please inform us immediately.

We aim to respond to all submissions within 10 days of receipt (usually less). We will not respond (accept or decline) with a form letter and we will comment on poems whenever possible.

Please wait a minimum of six months between submissions

If your work is accepted at THRUSH, you agree to grant us First North American Serial Rights, all archival rights, plus the rights to reprint in any future anthologies. Upon publication, all rights revert back to the author. You agree that if your poem/s subsequently appears elsewhere (in print or online), you will give due credit to THRUSH.

Our taste is eclectic. We want poems that move us, a strong sense of imagery, emotion, with interesting and surprising use of language, words that resonate.  We want fresh. We want voice.

Established and new poets are encouraged to submit. Experimental poetry is fine, randomness is fine also. However, we do not want experimental and random just for the sake of calling it such. No long poems. We prefer a poem that will fit on one page. We are not interested in inspirational poetry or philosophical musings.

Submissions that ignore these guidelines (or parts of these guidelines) will likely be declined immediately.

We nominate for most major prizes. See our Awards page

Our guidelines are subject to change. We suggest reviewing them prior to submitting.

Submissions and other correspondence should be sent to:  editorthrushpoetryjournal@gmail.com

~*~

One Sentence Poems: Now Seeking Submissions

As their name suggests, One Sentence Poems is an online literary journal publishing poems composed of a single sentence.

A project of Ambidextrous Bloodhound Productions and a relative of the literary journal Right Hand Pointing, One Sentence Poems has been publishing a new poem every Tuesday through Saturday since 2014. You can get a sense of their style by reading the poems they publish online.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions all the time. They respond to all submissions, usually within two weeks. After they accept a poem, they publish it online in the following few weeks.

Poets may submit up to four single-sentence poems of at least two lines. In other words, each poem must have at least one line break. They publish poems in any form, though they prefer left-justified poems and usually don’t care for scattered forms.

Each poem must consist of one complete and grammatically correct sentence. That means it must begin with a capital letter and end with a terminal punctuation mark. Using semicolons to connect sentences is cheating. Long sentences are fine, but a reader should be able to speak the poem in one breath.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions online, but not via post or by email. They do not accept previously published work.

If you would like to learn more or submit to One Sentence Poems, please visit their website at http://www.onesentencepoems.com/osp/how-to-submit/.

 

Do it

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

I sponsor this challenge to help poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

 

can i help you

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

 

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

 

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

 

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of SUNDAY, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

 

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

 Great ideaI have also been sharing your poetry on my Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Please feel free to FOLLOW, LIKE, & SHARE from my page. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

tanka tuesday fall

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: “Change & Defy,” #SynonymsOnly

Have fun and write some poetry!

challenge accepted

“The Feather,” Flash Fiction

August 23, 2018, Carrot Ranch Literary Community Flash Fiction prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story that includes magic. It can be a supernatural force, a moment or idea, or use it as a verb. Go where the prompt leads. Respond by August 28, 2018.

IMG_1905

I finished my gardening chores and wrapped the hose into a coil. There on the ground was a tiny grey feather. I picked it up and placed it under my gloves on the table for safe keeping.

I walked toward the front garden where my daylilies drooped. I held the spray over the plants, and there on the ground was another gray feather!

I hurried to retrieve the first feather, but it was gone. It was then, the magic of the moment struck me. Without a doubt, this feather had wanted me to find it. What could it mean?

true story

A memoirist I will never be, but nevertheless, this happened to me last week. There is plenty of evidence that finding a feather (or a magical one, as I did) represents some good omens.

IMG_1907

Two days later, I found a black feather, much larger, lodged in the rocks across from where I sit on my patio. Coincidence? Not to this fairy whisperer…

Click HERE to learn about the magic of finding a feather. ❤

all the best writing Thanks for stopping by. ❤

 

Colleen’s #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge Recap No. 98, “Sad & Write,” #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules on the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

CHANGES ARE COMING TO WORDPRESS!

I have no idea how this will affect us for this challenge or blogging with WordPress. I’ll try to roll with the changes.

In the meantime, I’ve upgraded to the business plan so that I could get a plugin to stay with the original WordPress editor.

Click this link to learn more: Writer’s Tips – #Friday Blog share – #Selfpublishing – #WordPress Changes Coming/D.G. Kayewriter.com


PLEASE NOTE: Don’t forget to count your syllables. Use this site: howmanysyllables.com. Click on the workshop tab. Then, copy and paste your poem into the box, and click “count syllables” at the bottom.


For some, this challenge is a way to learn more about writing in English, even though it’s the American version. English is a second language to many of our participants.

I also understand that accent and inflection play a key roll in the way you say certain words and this will change the syllable count. Here is my compromise: Please try to get as close to the syllable count as possible when writing these syllabic forms of poetry.

This challenge is not for free-verse poetry. ❤

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown an impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do. ❤

Poet of the Week

This week, I’ve chosen Sue Vincent, and her poem, Cliché… This poem really stood out to me because the first part is a Cinquain which creates the first act of what will follow. In this way, the Cinquain sets up the synonyms for the words, “sad and write.”

Yet, it is the rhythmic stanzas that flow afterward which give this poem its power. Interesting to note, her syllables used per line are in an 8 syllable, 6 syllable pattern almost all the way to the end, illustrating the metre power of the iambic pentameters in her words.

 

robin-hoods-stride-2
Cliché
Hackneyed, outworn,
Sighing, mourning, why-ing
Penned expressions of emotion
Human

*

It is, they say, just a cliché
To pen a mournful verse,
An ode to love, a billet doux,
A burning flame…or worse…

And yet, the universal pen
Of lovers everywhere
Turns first to rhyme and doggerel
When seeking words of care.

Perhaps the poet and the heart
Have gone too deep for skill
And with emotion’s misaimed sword
Their own expressions kill?

Sometimes a cliché’s all that works
… The rose and turtle dove…
To confine hearts to paper words
(Or find a rhyme for ‘love’).

Do not dismiss the doggerel;
Within outmoded form,
The heart that seeks the words to speak
Is genuine and warm.

Although the words are shaped awry
And though the phrases pall,
The love they hold is not cliché’d
But at the heart of all.

© 2018 Sue Vincent

“Poetry is not an expression of the party line. It’s that time of night, lying in bed, thinking what you really think, making the private world public, that’s what the poet does.” Allen Ginsberg

picgifs-books-1747164

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 98th POETRY CHALLENGE USING SYNONYMS FOR THE WORDS: “Sad & Write”

 Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge No. 98, “Sad & Write,” #SynonymsOnly | willowdot21

Tanka – Turmoil! | radhikasreflection

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Challenge – Sad & Write #MicroPoetry #Cinquain | But I Smile Anyway…

How poetry works – ….Bilocalalia….

Sharing With Others –

Acedia Mood: A #TankaTuesday #TankaProse – Frank J. Tassone

Cliché… | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Sad & Write | Annette Rochelle Aben

A Type of Artist (Senryu) – Let Me Tell You the Story of…

Crickets: Darkness and Light: Haibun – Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Colleen’s Poetry Challenge/D.G. Kaye Writer.com

adieu | like mercury colliding…

memories consume.. – syncwithdeep

Poetry Friday ~ Sad & Write | The Writer Next Door|Vashti Q

Glimpse of Wonder | Stuff and what if…

Severed Synapse | method two madness

Twilight Fading – Charmed Chaos

Hummingbirds Rain Truce–Haiku – John Maberry’s Writing

 Undelivered #Senryu #Poetry – Poems for Warriors

 Tanka Tuesday: Sad & Write – Jane Dougherty Writes

Tanka Tuesday – Truth | Twenty Four

For Maisie – “our heroine for all time” | Mucky Boots and Flawless Paws

Colleen’s Poetry Challenge/The Shower of Blessings.com

Dying Dreams – thehouseofbailey

Departure/Willow Poetry

Regards The new challenge is up Tuesday morning. See you there! ❤

 

 

Shared from the: Smorgasbord End of Summer Party – Afternoon Tea – Colleen Chesebro, Sue Hampton, Jane Gogerty, Norah Colvin, Jane Risdon, Wendy Janes, Gigi Sedlmayer, Jena C. Henry and Darlene Foster

Sally Cronin is having an end of summer party! Come on and join in!

Welcome to the second of the end of summer party meals today. Afternoon Tea is a time for sandwiches, cakes, and scones… and I hope my guests today have brought their appetites with them. Later on this evening… a dinner party to round the day off. And tomorrow Sunday Lunch.

Click the link below to meet some fabulous authors, including yours truly. ❤

End of Summer Afternoon TEA

 

P. S. I’ve updated my blog to the business plan. Please let me know if you are having a hard time finding me so I can let WordPress know. ❤

 

Comet

comet-877918_640

A fabulous group of talented writers sharing stories about comets. Settle in and have a read. ❤

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

With trails that stretch across the sky, some comets burn so brightly they appear during the light of day. They burn into our imaginations, sparking questions and prophecies. Some people dance (naked), some despair.

Writers flashed comets this week with tales from around the world and both hemispheres. Take a ride on a comet through the literary art of flash fiction.

The following is based on the August 16, 2018, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about a comet.

PART I (10-minute read)

The Comet of 1858 by James McCanles (5th-great-grandfather of Charli Mills)

Hail! beautious stranger to our sky,
How bright thy robes appear,
Noiseless thou trends thy paths on high,
And converse with all our stars.

In radiant flame of glowing light
Thy silent orb rolls on,
Through vast eternities of night,
To mortal man unknown.

Thy magnitude thy fiery glow,
Thy towering…

View original post 4,055 more words

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 98, “Sad & Write,” #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to Tanka Tuesday

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.


Opportunities for Poets

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Radarpoetry.com welcomes unsolicited submissions of poems during our reading period of October 1 through June 30.  

During the months of July, August, and September, we read and administer the Coniston Prize and are open to prize submissions only.  Please see the contest page for details.

Guidelines

Please read the guidelines carefully as they have recently been updated.

We recommend you read our issues to get a sense of our aesthetic before sending your workWe only accept poems only through our submissions managerPoems sent by email will be deleted.

Submit 3-5 original, previously unpublished poems in a single document. We read blind, so please ensure there is no identifying information on the document that contains your poems. You should include a cover letter and a brief bio in the comments boxWe welcome translations as long as all necessary rights have been secured by the translator.

We accept simultaneous submissions and ask that you notify us right away if your work has been accepted elsewhere. For partial withdrawals, simply add a note to your entry on Submittable. We do not accept multiple submissions.

We respond to each submission within a month, and often much sooner than that. After 30 days have passed, feel free to query us. You can also report and track your submission through Duotrope. Unless you are specifically invited to send more work, please wait 6 months after before submitting again.

Former contributors should wait one calendar year after the publication of their poems before submitting again.

We secure first serial rights for poems we publish. Upon publication, all rights revert to the author. We are proud to nominate our contributors for major awards including the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. We ask that all contributors cite Radar Poetry should their poems be published elsewhere in the future.

We look forward to reading your work!

~*~

Thrushpoetryjournal.com – a journal of poetry that will appear 6 times a year. ( January, March, May, July, September, and November)

We believe in showcasing the best work we receive. We will present a select number of poems per edition.

Submissions are now open. We read submissions on a rolling basis. We are not a paying market.

Submit previously unpublished work only. If you are sending us work that appears on your website, blog, or a self-publishing site, please remove it prior to submitting to us. Send us no more than three poems, pasted in the body of an email, preceded by a cover letter. If your poem requires special formatting, you may then, and please only then, also include an attachment.

Please indicate “POETRY SUBMISSION” on your subject line. Submissions without “Poetry Submission” in the subject line will be deleted unread.

Include a bio (all bios are subject to editing). Also include a URL to your blog or website, if applicable. Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but not preferred. If your work is accepted elsewhere please inform us immediately.

We aim to respond to all submissions within 10 days of receipt (usually less). We will not respond (accept or decline) with a form letter and we will comment on poems whenever possible.

Please wait a minimum of six months between submissions

If your work is accepted at THRUSH, you agree to grant us First North American Serial Rights, all archival rights, plus the rights to reprint in any future anthologies. Upon publication, all rights revert back to the author. You agree that if your poem/s subsequently appears elsewhere (in print or online), you will give due credit to THRUSH.

Our taste is eclectic. We want poems that move us, a strong sense of imagery, emotion, with interesting and surprising use of language, words that resonate.  We want fresh. We want voice.

Established and new poets are encouraged to submit. Experimental poetry is fine, randomness is fine also. However, we do not want experimental and random just for the sake of calling it such. No long poems. We prefer a poem that will fit on one page. We are not interested in inspirational poetry or philosophical musings.

Submissions that ignore these guidelines (or parts of these guidelines) will likely be declined immediately.

We nominate for most major prizes. See our Awards page

Our guidelines are subject to change. We suggest reviewing them prior to submitting.

Submissions and other correspondence should be sent to:  editorthrushpoetryjournal@gmail.com

~*~

One Sentence Poems: Now Seeking Submissions

As their name suggests, One Sentence Poems is an online literary journal publishing poems composed of a single sentence.

A project of Ambidextrous Bloodhound Productions and a relative of the literary journal Right Hand Pointing, One Sentence Poems has been publishing a new poem every Tuesday through Saturday since 2014. You can get a sense of their style by reading the poems they publish online.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions all the time. They respond to all submissions, usually within two weeks. After they accept a poem, they publish it online in the following few weeks.

Poets may submit up to four single-sentence poems of at least two lines. In other words, each poem must have at least one line break. They publish poems in any form, though they prefer left-justified poems and usually don’t care for scattered forms.

Each poem must consist of one complete and grammatically correct sentence. That means it must begin with a capital letter and end with a terminal punctuation mark. Using semicolons to connect sentences is cheating. Long sentences are fine, but a reader should be able to speak the poem in one breath.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions online, but not via post or by email. They do not accept previously published work.

If you would like to learn more or submit to One Sentence Poems, please visit their website at http://www.onesentencepoems.com/osp/how-to-submit/.

 

goals

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

I sponsor this challenge to help poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

hip hip hurray

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of SUNDAY, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I got this

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

 Great ideaI have also been sharing your poetry on my Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Please feel free to FOLLOW, LIKE, & SHARE from my page. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Life is likea cup of tea

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: “Sad & Write,” #SynonymsOnly

Have fun and write some poetry!

challenge accepted

The FIRST PLACE WINNER in the July 2018 Word Weaver Writing Contest: Adele Marie Park,“Devil’s Hollow Holy Water”

I’m proud to announce that my Sister of the Fey, Adele Marie Park, won first place in Dan Alatorre’s Word Weaver Writing Contest! Congratulations, Adele! ❤

Dan Alatorre

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your humble host

It is my pleasure to present to you the #1 story from the July 2018 Word Weaver Writing Contest.

Adele’s tale absolutely grabbed me from the beginning, and I really enjoyed it. You will, too.

Have a good time reading this story. I’ll give you my reasons for why I liked it at the bottom of the post.

Enjoy!


GRAND PRIZE WINNER

1st“Devil’s Hollow Holy Water”

Adele Marie Park


A community that hides a secret, sticks together. It binds them like glue and smells just as evil.

Holy Water is one of those towns built upon the bones of those we took it from.

Oh, they’ll tell you that the settlers wandered for months without water when they came upon the river. The founding father fell on his knees and declared it a miracle. Hallelujah,  Holy Water was born.

I’m smiling at you, Doc ’cause your last…

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Colleen’s #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge Recap “Love & Time,” No. 97, #SynonymsOnly

life-is-likea-cup-of-tea

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules on the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

PLEASE NOTE: Don’t forget to count your syllables. Use this site: howmanysyllables.com. Click on the workshop tab. Then, copy and paste your poem into the box, and click “count syllables” at the bottom.

For some, this challenge is a way to learn more about writing in English, even though it’s the American version. English is a second language to many of our participants.

I also understand that accent and inflection play a key roll in the way you say certain words and this will change the syllable count. Here is my compromise: Please try to get as close to the syllable count as possible when writing these syllabic forms of poetry.

This challenge is not for free-verse poetry. ❤

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown an impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do. ❤

POET OF THE WEEK

This week, I couldn’t make a decision on who should be the Poet of the Week. There were too many fabulous poems. I was blown away by your creativity, choice of words, and your presentations. So, this week, you are ALL my Poets of the Week. ❤

Here are a few poets who have dazzled me this week:

Noises | method two madness Breathtaking imagery in this Haibun/Double Haiku.

An unreceived Present – Frank J. Tassone A Haibun/Double Tanka – Philosophical and deep!

Butterfly Dreams | Stuff and what if… A fabulous Butterfly Cinquain.

Returning | like mercury colliding… A cinquain that ignites your senses.

Passion – thehouseofbailey An expressive Butterfly Cinquain about love.

Tanka Tuesday – Captive | Twenty Four A love story in a Tanka.

Love & Time/Lady Lee Manila A Kyrielle – Look this one up HERE, it’s pretty special.

World Peace/D. G. Kaye Writer An excellent Tanka with a message of hope for humanity.

Poetry Friday ~ Love & Time (Synonyms) | The Writer Next Door|Vashti Q Use your poetry to bring attention to environmental concerns.

Bloody GoodPoetry! Congratulations, All!

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 97th POETRY CHALLENGE USING SYNONYMS FOR THE WORDS: “Love & Time”

Afraid – Reena Saxena

you, me and moments – syncwithdeep

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge No. 97, “Love &Time,”SynonymsOnly | willowdot21

Love & Time/Lady Lee Manila A Kyrielle

Swift as swallows – Jane Dougherty Writes

Denying God does not destroy Him – Sharing With Others –

Love & Time/Poems to Treasure

#Tanka, dog poet tells the time | Mucky Boots and Flawless Paws

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Challenge – Love & Time #MicroPoetry | But I Smile Anyway…

Adoration/Colleen’s Weekly #TankaTuesday #Poetry Challenge – Thoughts, Musings, and Stuff

World Peace/D. G. Kaye Writer

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge “Love & Time” | The Showers of Blessings

Noises | method two madness

Fugitive | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

An unreceived Present – Frank J. Tassone

A Mama’s Affection – SallyChowdhary

Butterfly Dreams | Stuff and what if…

Returning | like mercury colliding…

My First Haiku | Helena Smole

“The Prophecy,” A Flash Fiction/Senryu | Colleen Chesebro ~ The Fairy Whisperer

Poetry Friday ~ Love & Time (Synonyms) | The Writer Next Door|Vashti Q

Passion – thehouseofbailey

Waiting/Poems for Warriors

Tanka Tuesday – Captive | Twenty Four

Flowing and Flown: Haibun – Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

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DID YOU KNOW THAT WRITING POETRY CAN YOU MAKE YOU A BETTER WRITER?

“Poetry places heavy emphasis on the aesthetic properties of language as a way of communicating emotion and suggesting meaning. “Aesthetic properties” encompasses a lot, but some of the big ones are: visual imagery and other intense sensory information; the rhythmic structure of lines, sentences, phrases, and even individual words; and the sound of the writing when read aloud (or even in your head). Because poems usually use so many fewer words than stories and essays, each word must do as much work as possible and as such must be very carefully chosen.” by Tania Strauss

Read the rest of the article here: Studying Poetry made Me a Better Writer

 

you got it bossThe new challenge post comes out Tuesday. Are you ready to write some poetry?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fairies, Myths, & Magic- A Summer Celebration by Colleen M. Chesebro #Fantasy #BookReview @ColleenChesebro

I am honored and thrilled to share a lovely review from an author I love, Jacquie Biggar. Please stop by and say hello. Her books are great! ❤

Jacquie Biggar-USA Today Best-selling author

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Step into a world where fairies, dragons, and other magical beings converge in a collection of poetry and short stories inspired by the celebration of Litha, the Summer Solstice.

Meet Drac, a dragon cursed by his own poisonous deeds, and two pixies who help an old man remember a lost love. You’ll meet a pair of fairies with a sense of humor, and a young girl who fulfills her destiny after being struck by lightning. Learn what happens when a modern witch’s spell goes terribly wrong. Meet the Sisters of the Fey, a group of Slavic Witches who sign a pact with the Rusalki Fey to preserve their magic for the good of all.

Atmospheric and haunting, the prose and poetry, will rewrite the mythologies of the past bringing them into the future.

Biography

Colleen

Colleen M. Chesebro is a writer of paranormal fantasy and magical realism, cross-genre fiction, poetry, and…

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