Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 86, Fantasy & Merry, #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to Tanka Tuesday

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and by leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.


Opportunities for Poets

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Launched in 2005, Mookychick—an online publisher of fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and reviews—has evolved into a community forum for just about everything. Eclectic and inclusive, they aim to connect like minds of all varieties. From fashion to faith and everything beyond, upside-down, and in-between—Mookychick wants to know about it. The best way to get a sense of what they like is to read the magazine online.

Mookychick is published frequently, and since 2005 they’ve showcased over 600 regular contributors. Although they don’t pay authors, they promote poets and writers by publishing author profiles and sharing their work with a broad readership.

Authors of fiction may submit short stories up to 2,000 words in length. Mookychick also likes to publish flash fiction up to 500 words, and 50-word stories that are exactly 50 words (not including the title). Poets are also welcome to submit.

Mookychick publishes a wide variety of nonfiction. They like articles on personal matters of all types, articles on self-care, opinion pieces, and interviews. They also publish reviews of books, comics, games, music, and events. They usually prefer pieces that are at least 350 words in length, but they also publish photo essays with fewer words. They don’t impose a maximum word count because they want authors to write until they’re finished.

All submissions should include a third-person bio, and authors can choose to include a personal link and photo if they want. Mookychick likes to build each author an individual profile page.

They accept submissions from all types of people and aim to promote marginalized voices as often as they can. They prefer pieces on marginalized perspectives to be written by people who embody those perspectives.

Mookychick accepts submissions via email, not online or by post. They don’t accept previously published work, even if it only appeared on a personal blog or social media.

If you would like to learn more or submit to Mookychick, please visit their website at mookychick.co.uk.

~*~

Radarpoetry.com welcomes unsolicited submissions of poems during our reading period of October 1 through June 30.  

During the months of July, August, and September, we read and administer the Coniston Prize and are open to prize submissions only.  Please see the contest page for details.

Guidelines

Please read the guidelines carefully as they have recently been updated.

We recommend you read our issues to get a sense of our aesthetic before sending your workWe only accept poems only through our submissions managerPoems sent by email will be deleted.

Submit 3-5 original, previously unpublished poems in a single document. We read blind, so please ensure there is no identifying information on the document that contains your poems. You should include a cover letter and a brief bio in the comments boxWe welcome translations as long as all necessary rights have been secured by the translator.

We accept simultaneous submissions and ask that you notify us right away if your work has been accepted elsewhere. For partial withdrawals, simply add a note to your entry on Submittable. We do not accept multiple submissions.

We respond to each submission within a month, and often much sooner than that. After 30 days have passed, feel free to query us. You can also report and track your submission through Duotrope. Unless you are specifically invited to send more work, please wait 6 months after before submitting again.

Former contributors should wait one calendar year after the publication of their poems before submitting again.

We secure first serial rights for poems we publish. Upon publication, all rights revert to the author. We are proud to nominate our contributors for major awards including the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. We ask that all contributors cite Radar Poetry should their poems be published elsewhere in the future.

We look forward to reading your work!

~*~

Thrushpoetryjournal.com – a journal of poetry that will appear 6 times a year. ( January, March, May, July, September, and November)

We believe in showcasing the best work we receive. We will present a select number of poems per edition.

Submissions are now open. We read submissions on a rolling basis. We are not a paying market.

Submit previously unpublished work only. If you are sending us work that appears on your website, blog, or a self-publishing site, please remove it prior to submitting to us. Send us no more than three poems, pasted in the body of an email, preceded by a cover letter. If your poem requires special formatting, you may then, and please only then, also include an attachment.

Please indicate “POETRY SUBMISSION” on your subject line. Submissions without “Poetry Submission” in the subject line will be deleted unread.

Include a bio (all bios are subject to editing). Also include a URL to your blog or website, if applicable. Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but not preferred. If your work is accepted elsewhere please inform us immediately.

We aim to respond to all submissions within 10 days of receipt (usually less). We will not respond (accept or decline) with a form letter and we will comment on poems whenever possible.

Please wait a minimum of six months between submissions

If your work is accepted at THRUSH, you agree to grant us First North American Serial Rights, all archival rights, plus the rights to reprint in any future anthologies. Upon publication, all rights revert back to the author. You agree that if your poem/s subsequently appears elsewhere (in print or online), you will give due credit to THRUSH.

Our taste is eclectic. We want poems that move us, a strong sense of imagery, emotion, with interesting and surprising use of language, words that resonate.  We want fresh. We want voice.

Established and new poets are encouraged to submit. Experimental poetry is fine, randomness is fine also. However, we do not want experimental and random just for the sake of calling it such. No long poems. We prefer a poem that will fit on one page. We are not interested in inspirational poetry or philosophical musings.

Submissions that ignore these guidelines (or parts of these guidelines) will likely be declined immediately.

We nominate for most major prizes. See our Awards page

Our guidelines are subject to change. We suggest reviewing them prior to submitting.

Submissions and other correspondence should be sent to:  editorthrushpoetryjournal@gmail.com

goals

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

I sponsor this challenge to help budding poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

hip hip hurray

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of SUNDAY, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I got this

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

 Great ideaI have also been sharing your poetry on my Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Please feel free to FOLLOW, LIKE, & SHARE from my page. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Life is likea cup of tea

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: FANTASY & MERRY #SynonymsOnly

Have fun and write some poetry!

challenge accepted

COLLEEN’S #TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE RECAP, “Hurry & Last,” #SYNONYMSONLY

life-is-likea-cup-of-tea

PLEASE NOTE: I WILL BE ON VACATION FROM JUNE 4 – 14, 2018. THERE WILL BE NO MONDAY POETRY RECAPS FOR THE NEXT COUPLE OF WEEKS. AS ALWAYS, PARTICIPATION IN THE CHALLENGE IS VOLUNTARY. THANKS FOR YOUR COLLABORATION AND FOR ENJOYING POETRY AS MUCH AS I DO! ❤

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules on the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown an impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do. ❤

POET OF THE WEEK

This week, I’ve chosen Reena Saxena, and her poem, “Haste,” to be featured as the poet of the week. I called this poem a Senryu because of the “romantic/breakup overtones in her words. Refresh your thoughts on the differences between Senryu and Haiku HERE.

“Senryu poems do not explore human nature by looking outward at the natural world, but makes the human, not the world around him, its subject. As might be expected from a poem that was first achieved through teasing and game-playing, the tone of the senyru is always humorous, sometimes even sarcastic.”  Penandthepad.com

Shadow Poetry.com also defines a Senryu, “Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.”

In Reena’s poem, the last line is sarcastic, defining the poem as a Senryu, instead of a Haiku. Let’s face it, if you Google, how to write a senryu poem, you will find many gray areas between a Haiku and a Senryu. As a poet, you should define your own work. Don’t leave it up to someone else to decide.

I also love the brevity of this Senryu. For so few words, Reena’s Senryu packs a wallop of emotions into her poem.

“Haste”

haste

Smashing good time

Congratulations, Reena!

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 85th POETRY CHALLENGE USING SYNONYMS FOR THE WORDS: “Hurry & Last”

Colleen’s Tuesday Poetry Challenge: Hurry & Last – The Militant Negro™ A special thank you for helping to share the love of poetry ❤

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 81, Hurry & Last, #Synonyms Only – Ladyleemanila

Haste – Reena Saxena

Life – #tanka | Trent’s World (the Blog)

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Hurry & Last | Annette Rochelle Aben

ANTS, GO MARCHING — and Catholics – Sharing With Others –

Tanka: Hurry & Last – Jane Dougherty Writes

Augury – ….Bilocalalia….

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 85, Hurry & Last, #SynonymsOnly | willowdot21

Haiku | Does writing excuse watching?

Enjoy the Ride | Stuff and what if…

Passing Time – Rhyme In Time 

A Thanatotic Observation: a #TankaTuesday (5/22/18) #TankaProse – Frank J. Tassone

Scenery… | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

whirling in timelines – Storie Cantabile

Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday: HURRY and LAST – Afterwards

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday 81 – The Bag Lady

Breathe | like mercury colliding…

#Tanka: Quickening – Charmed Chaos

Cages #Haiku | Lemon Shark Reef

Dandelion Dreams | Chelsea Ann Owens

A Dandelion Linked Verse Tanka | TheGuern

Tanka – Rat Race/Radhika’s Reflection

Tanka Tuesday | Twenty Four

Alan Bean, Apollo Astronaut: Tanka – Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Rain – Aweni

Running/Scott Andrew Bailey

dream teamCongratulations and many thanks to my POETIC DREAM TEAM who write the poetry that makes me smile each week.  ❤

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smorgasbord Posts from My Archives – Odd Jobs and Characters – Odd Jobs and Characters – The Steak House – Counting Peas and a Ghost Story by Sally Cronin

Bloody Good

Sally Cronin is a prolific writer with enough fabulous life experiences for two people. Read about the time she worked in a steakhouse… if you dare!

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

This series shares some of the jobs I have turned my hand to over that fifty years, and some were very odd. Not many have sat at a table between two teams of champion dairy cows, selling bull semen!  Over the years I have accumulated a massive dossier of characters and events that now take centre stage in my short stories.

If you have read my novel Just an Odd Job Girlyou will have met some of them but over the next few weeks I hope to bring you some of the others that inspired and stimulated my imagination.

Not all these posts appeared on Smorgasbord as some fantastic blogging friends allowed me to guest post. If that is the case of course I will include their books and links.

You can find the previous odd jobs here: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/short-stories-odd-jobs-and-characters-2018/

This week’s episode was kindly hosted by Sue Vincent on…

View original post 1,357 more words

The Impact of Narcissistic Parents

My dear friend, and Sister of the Fey, D. G. Kaye, has been quoted in this article, with the reading link below. What an honor! D.G. Kaye has written memoirs about her experiences. Check out her books here: https://www.amazon.com/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO.

“Somehow I believed it was my obligation to try and do the right thing by her because she had given birth to me.” ~D.G. Kaye

The following article is by Dr. Perry, Ph.D. It is an understatement to state that parents…

Source: The Impact of Narcissistic Parents

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 85, Hurry & Last, #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to Tanka Tuesday

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and by leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.


Opportunities for Poets

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Launched in 2005, Mookychick—an online publisher of fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and reviews—has evolved into a community forum for just about everything. Eclectic and inclusive, they aim to connect like minds of all varieties. From fashion to faith and everything beyond, upside-down, and in-between—Mookychick wants to know about it. The best way to get a sense of what they like is to read the magazine online.

Mookychick is published frequently, and since 2005 they’ve showcased over 600 regular contributors. Although they don’t pay authors, they promote poets and writers by publishing author profiles and sharing their work with a broad readership.

Authors of fiction may submit short stories up to 2,000 words in length. Mookychick also likes to publish flash fiction up to 500 words, and 50-word stories that are exactly 50 words (not including the title). Poets are also welcome to submit.

Mookychick publishes a wide variety of nonfiction. They like articles on personal matters of all types, articles on self-care, opinion pieces, and interviews. They also publish reviews of books, comics, games, music, and events. They usually prefer pieces that are at least 350 words in length, but they also publish photo essays with fewer words. They don’t impose a maximum word count because they want authors to write until they’re finished.

All submissions should include a third-person bio, and authors can choose to include a personal link and photo if they want. Mookychick likes to build each author an individual profile page.

They accept submissions from all types of people and aim to promote marginalized voices as often as they can. They prefer pieces on marginalized perspectives to be written by people who embody those perspectives.

Mookychick accepts submissions via email, not online or by post. They don’t accept previously published work, even if it only appeared on a personal blog or social media.

If you would like to learn more or submit to Mookychick, please visit their website at mookychick.co.uk.

~*~

Radarpoetry.com welcomes unsolicited submissions of poems during our reading period of October 1 through June 30.  

During the months of July, August, and September, we read and administer the Coniston Prize and are open to prize submissions only.  Please see the contest page for details.

Guidelines

Please read the guidelines carefully as they have recently been updated.

We recommend you read our issues to get a sense of our aesthetic before sending your workWe only accept poems only through our submissions managerPoems sent by email will be deleted.

Submit 3-5 original, previously unpublished poems in a single document. We read blind, so please ensure there is no identifying information on the document that contains your poems. You should include a cover letter and a brief bio in the comments boxWe welcome translations as long as all necessary rights have been secured by the translator.

We accept simultaneous submissions and ask that you notify us right away if your work has been accepted elsewhere. For partial withdrawals, simply add a note to your entry on Submittable. We do not accept multiple submissions.

We respond to each submission within a month, and often much sooner than that. After 30 days have passed, feel free to query us. You can also report and track your submission through Duotrope. Unless you are specifically invited to send more work, please wait 6 months after before submitting again.

Former contributors should wait one calendar year after the publication of their poems before submitting again.

We secure first serial rights for poems we publish. Upon publication, all rights revert to the author. We are proud to nominate our contributors for major awards including the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. We ask that all contributors cite Radar Poetry should their poems be published elsewhere in the future.

We look forward to reading your work!

~*~

Thrushpoetryjournal.com – a journal of poetry that will appear 6 times a year. ( January, March, May, July, September, and November)

We believe in showcasing the best work we receive. We will present a select number of poems per edition.

Submissions are now open. We read submissions on a rolling basis. We are not a paying market.

Submit previously unpublished work only. If you are sending us work that appears on your website, blog, or a self-publishing site, please remove it prior to submitting to us. Send us no more than three poems, pasted in the body of an email, preceded by a cover letter. If your poem requires special formatting, you may then, and please only then, also include an attachment.

Please indicate “POETRY SUBMISSION” on your subject line. Submissions without “Poetry Submission” in the subject line will be deleted unread.

Include a bio (all bios are subject to editing). Also include a URL to your blog or website, if applicable. Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but not preferred. If your work is accepted elsewhere please inform us immediately.

We aim to respond to all submissions within 10 days of receipt (usually less). We will not respond (accept or decline) with a form letter and we will comment on poems whenever possible.

Please wait a minimum of six months between submissions

If your work is accepted at THRUSH, you agree to grant us First North American Serial Rights, all archival rights, plus the rights to reprint in any future anthologies. Upon publication, all rights revert back to the author. You agree that if your poem/s subsequently appears elsewhere (in print or online), you will give due credit to THRUSH.

Our taste is eclectic. We want poems that move us, a strong sense of imagery, emotion, with interesting and surprising use of language, words that resonate.  We want fresh. We want voice.

Established and new poets are encouraged to submit. Experimental poetry is fine, randomness is fine also. However, we do not want experimental and random just for the sake of calling it such. No long poems. We prefer a poem that will fit on one page. We are not interested in inspirational poetry or philosophical musings.

Submissions that ignore these guidelines (or parts of these guidelines) will likely be declined immediately.

We nominate for most major prizes. See our Awards page

Our guidelines are subject to change. We suggest reviewing them prior to submitting.

Submissions and other correspondence should be sent to:  editorthrushpoetryjournal@gmail.com

goals

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

I sponsor this challenge to help budding poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

hip hip hurray

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of SUNDAY, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I got this

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

 Great ideaI have also been sharing your poetry on my Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Please feel free to FOLLOW, LIKE, & SHARE from my page. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Life is likea cup of tea

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: HURRY & LAST #SynonymsOnly

Have fun and write some poetry!

challenge accepted

Colleen’s #TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE, “Dignity & Success,” NO. 84 RECAP, #SYNONYMSONLY

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Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules on the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown an impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do. ❤

This week, I’ve chosen Aweni as the Poet of the Week for her Haibun poem called, Life and DeathI read this Haibun numerous times finding something different to like each time. This is a marvelous Haibun!

Haibun prose is written in the first-person singular which Aweni has done. The paragraphs are descriptive and share the poet’s thoughts. Notice how the haiku doesn’t explain the prose. We know it’s related in subject matter but it also “shows” us life and death, reinforcing the theme of the Haibun. It’s all connected. The prose reinforces the story that is told with the poetry.

I also like the poet’s choice of capitalization with the words “Life and Death.” Remember you want to follow the rules, but at the same time add some bit of creativity that stretches the boundaries by making it your own.

Brush up your Haibun writing skills HERE.

 

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I muse about Life and death, and it is revealed to me that they are two of a kind. Standing side by side. Touching, but not feeling, neither encroaching. They exist in harmony as they swirl in turns over the bridge of Time. Deep in the crevices of my mind, the knowledge that all souls that taste Life must Death’s call honour, is stirred. But my mind encases this knowledge with a cloak of invisibility so that I may romance Life to the fullest. She is my preferred option after all.

With a vow of death,
Life’s sweet taste caressed his tongue
Until death’s harsh call.

It is thought that neither Death nor Life triumphs over the other. In most matters, yes, this is the truth, but not in the realm of vision where Death triumphs. I am told we are all blind until the day we bade farewell to Life. But, I remain stoic and will not be derailed, as my mind’s cloak of invisibility thickens. I revel in this darkness. Sight can wait.

Blind, she weeps for him.
Sightful, he kissed his love’s lips.
She felt his lips not.

© 2018 Aweni

Image credit: designs.dubuddha.org

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Image Credit: Quotemaster.org

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 84th POETRY CHALLENGE USING SYNONYMS FOR THE WORDS: “Dignity and Success”

 Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Challenge: DIGNITY & SUCCESS – The Militant Negro™ Many thanks for his sharing to get the word out about this challenge ❤

Reena Saxena

Tanka: Dignity & Success – Jane Dougherty Writes

A Tanka and Two Almosts 😉 #tanka | Trent’s World (the Blog)

Peak experience – ….Bilocalalia….

“Life” Tanka Poetry — Challenge – Sharing With Others –

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Dignity & Success | Annette Rochelle Aben

COLLEEN’S 2018 WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY POETRY CHALLENGE #Haiku #84: Dignity & Success | But I Smile Anyway…

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 81, DIGNITY & SUCCESS, #SynonymsOnly | willowdot21

Triumph – thehouseofbailey

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka #81 ~ Dignity & Success – Wendyannedarling.com

Oak Tree: Tanka – Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Winds of Change | Stuff and what if…

Steller Joy: A #TankaTuesday (on a Wednesday) #tankaprose (5/16/18) – Frank J. Tassone

Tour de Force | like mercury colliding…

#Tanka: Love’s Victory – Charmed Chaos

Riches of Color | thoughts and entanglements

Poetic form | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

“The Litha Celebration,” A Garland Cinquain | Colleen Chesebro ~ The Fairy Whisperer

Tanka Tuesday | Twenty Four

Mucky Boots and Flawless Paws

Life and Death – Aweni

A+Poetry found here! ❤ See you tomorrow!

 

 

 

“The Litha Celebration,” A Garland Cinquain

This week I thought I would give you a tiny sneak peek into a project that my dear friend and Sister of the Fey, Wendy Anne Darling and I have been working on called, Fairies, Myths & Magic, Volume One – Summer Solstice. 

We’ve created our first collection of short stories and poetry that will publish on the Summer Solstice, June 21st… (if everything goes as planned). The Second book will publish a week before Halloween, the third book, in January 2019, and the fourth book, May 2019. In the weeks ahead we’ll be revealing the cover, so stay tuned.

This poetry challenge is such a big part of my life that I couldn’t see a way around not creating a poem for our book based off of some synonyms from a challenge. It just worked out that this week’s words fit the best. This poem is the last entry in the book. ❤

I used “honor,” for dignity and “profit,” for success. This is a garland cinquain which is a series of six cinquains in which the last is formed of lines from the preceding five, typically line one from stanza one, line two from stanza two, and so on.

As you can see, with proper alignment, the garland cinquain resembles a ribbon.

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The Litha Celebration, A Garland Cinquain

 

All hail

the Sun God reign

applaud the golden rays

as we grow in wisdom and might

Extol

 

Honor

the warmth and light

of bonfire’s cheerful glow

while fairies dance and spirits sing

Rejoice

Mystic

Summer Solstice

hints at changes to come

metamorphosis of ego –

Releases

 

Profit

from all good deeds

gained from sun, moon, and earth

our spirits rejuvenated

Rewards

 

Litha

Midsummer blessings

Closes the long-drawn day

Sending us on our way

Goodnight

 

All hail

The warmth and light

Hints at changes to come

Our spirits rejuvenated

Goodnight

© 2018 Colleen M. Chesebro

Smashing good timeSummer’s just around the corner. ❤

Colleen’s Coming Attractions – “The Yak Guy Project,” by C. S. Boyack

Colleen's ComingAttractions

C. S. Boyack has a new book out!

I’m a great fan of C. S. Boyack’s books. I know many of you are already acquainted with Craig, the prolific speculative fiction writer who features Lisa the Robot Girl on his famous Lisa Burton Radio.

What? You don’t know who that is?

Here’s the scoop!

Lisa Burton Radio: The main character from my first book is Lisa Burton. She’s a robot and makes regular appearances on Craig’s blog, usually under the Muse category. In early 2015 he decided to make her into the spokesmodel for this blog. There are posters, free paper dolls, and she started making guest appearances on other blogs. As her popularity grew, Craig decided she could interview the characters of other authors to help them promote their stories. Find Lisa Burton Radio HERE.

Lisa Burton

Okay, now that you know a little bit about C. S. Boyack, let’s get to the serious stuff!

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Author, C. S. Boyack

I was born in a town called Elko, Nevada. I like to tell everyone I was born in a small town in the 1940s. I’m not quite that old, but Elko has always been a little behind the times. This gives me a unique perspective of earlier times, and other ways of getting by. Some of this bleeds through into my fiction.

I moved to Idaho right after the turn of the century, and never looked back. My writing career was born here, with access to other writers and critique groups I jumped in with both feet.

I like to write about things that have something unusual. My works are in the realm of science fiction, paranormal, and fantasy. The goal is to entertain you for a few hours. I hope you enjoy the ride.

Imagine waking up in the desert with no idea what happened to you. You have clear memories of situations and places, but a complete loss in personal matters… like your own name. This situation is bad, and you have no idea how to get home.

When you’re rescued by a talking yak, the situation gets exponentially worse. You’ve obviously lost your mind. The immediate needs of a ride off the salt pan and searing heat, along with a drink of water, outweigh the concerns about your mental state.

This is exactly what happened to the Yak Guy. In fact, he’s been placed in an alternate world and given a chance to start over in life.

Can this selfish, almost parasitic, young man learn to start over in a world where charity is hard to find? Life is brutal and short here, but he’s going to have to adapt or perish.

The Yak Guy project is loosely based around The Fool’s Journey from the Tarot. Those with experience in Tarot will spot people and situations from the Major Arcana.

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Thanks for having me over to talk about my newest book, The Yak Guy Project. I’m known for experimenting, and this book is no exception. I try to set personal goals for my stories that help me grow as an author.

One of the things we learn fairly early is story structure. There are many ways of relaying a story, but the more popular ones are popular for a reason. I’ve also learned that mixing and mashing things up also works. This is one of those cases.

The Tarot deck contains some special cards called the Major Arcana. If you place them in order, they tell an evolutionary story of a character. The first card is The Fool. Think of him as the plain white chicken breast in cooking. He could become almost anything depending on what he’s exposed to. The Yak Guy is The Fool, but he doesn’t stay that way for long.

Yak Guy is a selfish, lazy young man. He’s a parasite upon those around him at the beginning of this story. This is kind of a portal fantasy. He’s from Las Vegas, but the setting for this story is a different world. His memory is wiped and fades completely in the first few chapters. Eventually, he adopts the name Ted to allow others to interact with him.

The Fool goes on to meet others along his journey who influence his life. The Fool meets The Magician first. Ted meets The Yak.

I’m not completely abandoning other story structures in this tale. The Yak fulfills some of the roles of The Magician card, but he’s also a mentor character. The Yak helps Ted grow as a person.

Something about a yak just screams for an Asian setting, so that is also part of the story. The new world is in the throes of a war that’s gone on for hundreds of years. The country is littered with technology that is better than they have now. These people are back to swords and horses at this point.

Ted’s story proceeds through various characters that reflect the Major Arcana of the Tarot. Astute observers will spot the Hanged Man, the Empress, even the Wheel of Fortune. (Hint: the wheel is much larger than you think it is, but the lesson is there.)

There are points where Ted learns some hard lessons. Decisions must be made that cannot be unmade. He is not able to compare sides in this war and join whichever side will be the cushiest for him. It’s an A or B decision, and he must live with the results. He learns to think and assess matters to the best of his ability.

This experiment posed some challenges. I made some characters do double duty in the story. At one point they represent one card, later in the book they represent another. The story didn’t need that many individually named characters.

I also stopped short. The Tarot takes The Fool into some absurd territory. There is no reason for him to become a World or a Sun. I wrapped it up at a good place with ample reward and a satisfying resolution to some very real problems.

The Yak Guy Project is a story of personal growth and coming of age. Of course, it also features swords, a caveman, and a talking yak. I hope you’ll consider taking this journey along with The Yak Guy.

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The Yak Guy Project sounds great! I’ve got my copy. Did you get yours?

Here’s where you can find C. S. Boyack:

Blog 

My Novels  

Twitter 

Goodreads 

Facebook 

Pinterest

Bloody Good

 Thanks for stopping by to meet C. S. Boyack and learn about his new book, “The Yak Guy Project.” ❤

Charisma of Cranes

I love the Carrot Ranch community. This challenge helps your writing grow. Check out these stories – 99 words. You’ve got time for that! ❤

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

Fossil records suggest cranes have existed for over 35 million years. Today, 15 species of cranes still grace the world, and the near-extinction of Whooping Cranes inspired action to protect these large, beautiful birds capable of dance.

Writers explored the charisma of cranes — their ability to capture our imaginations through art and preservation. As usual, the phrase remained open to writer interpretation.

The following are based on the May 10, 2018, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story defining “the charisma of cranes.”

PART I (10-minute read)

Sarus Crane by Irene Waters

Hearing the engines of the American F-4 jets we scattered but there was nowhere to go. The bombs fell, followed by huge explosions. A fireball engulfed everything for miles. The burning tar clung to the skin of those in the open. Those undercover coughed from the deadly carbon monoxide cloud that robbed the…

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