“The Fairy Witches,” A #Tanka

The prompt words for my Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge are charm and time, from which to find your synonyms. For charm, I’m using sorcery, and for time, I’m using spells.

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The Fairy Witches

 

Ancient sorcery –
spells shared to nourish others,
a benevolence
toward well being, not gain
my love shared, rewards received.

© 2018 Colleen M. Chesebro

Magic and witchcraft are blended into the Fairy-Faith of the ancients. It was believed that humans, magicians, and sorceresses received powers from the fairies. Primeval witches were mostly healers who cared for the people of their clans or tribes. They were herbalists and midwives who tended the sick and infirm. Most early witches claimed their powers of healing came from the fae folk who bestowed their knowledge of magic to the humans through witches. This knowledge caused witches to remove themselves from society. The cost was high.

Lairbehan.blogspot.com shares:

“The magic of the Good Neighbors that was taught to these witches – what I, in modern practice call Fairy Witchcraft – was about empowering the powerless and giving the witch a way to meet their own needs and to ensure their own safety. It was knowledge and magic that removed the person, to some degree, from human society and this removal made them dangerous because it realigned their allegiance in unpredictable ways. This is magic that is meant to effect real change for the benefit of the witch, not necessarily for some nebulous greater good.”

The first fairy witch I ever read about was Morgan le Fay, from the King Arthur legends. The fables share that Morgan Le Fay resided on the Isle of Avalon. She was considered to be magical and one of the fairy people, but also a witch. It is said that Morgan Le Fay took King Arthur to the magical Isle of Avalon as his last resting place after he succumbed to Mordred’s sword at the Battle of Camlann.

Fairies and witches have a long history together. As a paranormal fantasy author, it is a pleasure to explore those possibilities through my poetry and writing. ❤

Don't forgetTo VOTE for your favorite poem in the challenge post. Visit the links in the comments to find your favorite. Click HERE to vote. Click “OTHER” and type in the name of the poet or the name of their blog. ❤

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ben’s world 28/03/2018

I love Ben the dog’s poetry and was thrilled to find that his favorite thing to do last week was to write a poem for my Tanka Tuesday Challenge. That, Ben. He’s a darling. ❤

Mucky Boots and Flawless Paws

Hello,

how lovely of you to visit me, thank you. This is a snap shot of my world in response to the questions posed in Cee’s weekly ‘Share Your World

You can read all about my v. v. v big adventure by visiting my home page and also, my Munro blogs. All my poems are here  dog-poets page

What is your favorite color of hair? You can name your hair color or a color that you just like.

I’m a tri coloured Border Collie, mostly dark brown, which is a bit difficult to work with. However, I’ve got a streak of white running down my nose and I wondered about a bit of purple and orange, for a punk dog effect. What do you think, would it suit me?

My person is getting more and more grey but I’m not sure I’m allowed to tell you that. I hope I don’t go…

View original post 175 more words

Colleen’s 2018 #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 77: CHARM & TIME, #SnyonymsOnly

Welcome to Tanka Tuesday

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and by leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

We’re trying something new this week. Please come back to this post and vote for your favorite poem. This is a trial run so if it works, we will use this to pick our poet of the week from now on. Voting should close by next Sunday.

Please don’t vote for your own poetry. I have it set so you can only vote once. (I hope) 😀 ❤

POET OF THE WEEK


Opportunities for Poets

Wergle Flomp Humorous Poetry Contest NO FEE. The First prize is $1,000 and there’s a second prize of $250. Also, 10 Honorable Mentions will receive $100 each. The top 12 entries get published online. Judge: Jendi Reiter, assisted by Lauren Singer. Length limit: 250 lines. And there are no restrictions on age or country. DEADLINE APRIL 1st

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Launched in 2005, Mookychick—an online publisher of fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and reviews—has evolved into a community forum for just about everything. Eclectic and inclusive, they aim to connect like minds of all varieties. From fashion to faith and everything beyond, upside-down, and in-between—Mookychick wants to know about it. The best way to get a sense of what they like is to read the magazine online.

Mookychick is published frequently, and since 2005 they’ve showcased over 600 regular contributors. Although they don’t pay authors, they promote poets and writers by publishing author profiles and sharing their work with a broad readership.

Authors of fiction may submit short stories up to 2,000 words in length. Mookychick also likes to publish flash fiction up to 500 words, and 50-word stories that are exactly 50 words (not including the title). Poets are also welcome to submit.

Mookychick publishes a wide variety of nonfiction. They like articles on personal matters of all types, articles on self-care, opinion pieces, and interviews. They also publish reviews of books, comics, games, music, and events. They usually prefer pieces that are at least 350 words in length, but they also publish photo essays with fewer words. They don’t impose a maximum word count because they want authors to write until they’re finished.

All submissions should include a third-person bio, and authors can choose to include a personal link and photo if they want. Mookychick likes to build each author an individual profile page.

They accept submissions from all types of people and aim to promote marginalized voices as often as they can. They prefer pieces on marginalized perspectives to be written by people who embody those perspectives.

Mookychick accepts submissions via email, not online or by post. They don’t accept previously published work, even if it only appeared on a personal blog or social media.

If you would like to learn more or submit to Mookychick, please visit their website at mookychick.co.uk.

goals

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

The main reason why I sponsor this challenge is to help budding poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

hip hip hurray

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of SUNDAY at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A

This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I got this

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Life is likea cup of tea

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: CHARM & TIME

Have fun and write some poetry!

challenge accepted

 

“The Dream Rock” – Carrot Ranch Flash Fiction

smile at carrot ranch

March 22, 2018, Carrot Ranch Literary Community prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story using the theme “follow your dreams.” Bonus points for throwing a badge into the tale. Go where the prompt leads.

  • Respond by March 27, 2018, by leaving a link, pingback or story in the comments.
  • If you want your story published in the weekly collection, also post it at Carrot Ranch on Facebook in the post newsfeed (this is the second posting of your story).
  • Follow the style of the flash fiction that follows.
  • Leave a short link on FB with your story if you want one included in the title.
  • Rules are here.

 

follow your dreams

Abby followed her dream to the edge of a field filled with thorny weeds that twisted like ivy. Dead animals lay scattered, their bloated carcasses rotting beneath the blistering sun. An apocalyptic scent of death hung in the air. A boulder filled with glittery quartz striations moved closer.

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“This is our world without the bees,” said the rock. “The effects of climate change ravage the earth, disrupting the growth patterns. Animals die because their forage can’t mature without pollination.”

Abby swallowed the hard knot of truth. “What can I do?”

“You must save the bees.”

bee-colonies

Image Credit: “Mural Artivist Paints London In Bees To Save Them – 16 Photos”

This has been a sneak peek into “The Meadow Fairy,” book II in my YA paranormal fantasy series, The Heart Stone Chronicles. 16-year-old Abby Forester accepts her legacy to her mother and the fairy nymphs by attempting to find a cure to stop the bees from dying. Can she do it? Stay tuned…

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My dream boulder inspiration

Like Charli Mills, I LOVE rocks and yes, they do talk to my characters. I was so excited to figure out a talking dream rock sequence which was the perfect opportunity to earn my first Carrot Ranch Rocks badge.

carrotranchrocks

GiddyUPand write some flash fiction at CarrotRanch.com

#Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 76 Recap, “Joy & Fury”

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Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Recap. Last week’s words “joy and fury,” are opposites. Michael Lydon shares:

“Bringing words of opposite meaning close together is one of writing’s most ancient devices, called oxymoron when the opposites abutas they do in “oxymoron”: its Greek roots, oxys/moros, mean “sharp/dull”; and antithesiswhen close in balanced phrases like Catullus’s “Odi et amo—I hate and I love.” Opposites occur in the literature of every age, and any sophomore (wise fool) should be able to spot their linked unlikes in the any text’s black and white.”

Read more poetic techniques here: Wind Five-Folded School of Tanka, by Jane Reichhold.

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Serendipity –
leaving the madness behind,
bliss starts with deep thoughts.

© 2018 Colleen M. Chesebro

*For my Senryu (It’s a Senryu because meditation is a personal event), I used bliss, for joy, and madness for fury. ❤


The Tuesday challenge post will contain the rules and links to learn how to write the different forms. Please read the post to learn how to write the poetry forms for this challenge. Please LINK your poetry to that post – NOT this one. ❤

POET OF THE WEEK

This week’s POET of the WEEK is J.C. Wolfe from her blog, The Wolfe’s (Writing) Den.

I enjoyed her Haibun/Tanka, called: “Emotions on a Blank Page,” because J.C. wrote about writer’s block – something we all have experienced from time to time. Poetic writer’s block is difficult and I am sure that I have caused all of you to scream in frustration at my choice of words at least once.

The best cure for writer’s block is to write as J.C.’s Haibun shares with us.

How about you? How do you overcome writer’s block?

(If you would like to display the Poet of the Week Badge on your blog, please do! <3)

About_JCW (1)

Poet, J.C. Wolfe

“Emotions on a Blank Page”

The blank page stares at me, teasing me, mocking me, daring me to write something, anything. I frown back at the white screen, my mind still empty as ever. I reach into the void for any words that will break the block. Why won’t they come? I stare harder, seething at the space I wish would fill itself. Oh, how much I could write just about the frustration of having nothing to say… I stop. I smile. Yes, yes. Fingers to keys, I begin to type. The words come easily now. From rage comes enlightenment, from enlightenment, comes triumph. Before I know it, I’m grinning at a finished poem. At last, I’ve conquered the blank page.

Anger fuels the fire
Until all falls into place
And my smile returns
Happiness comes in flashes
But such is a writer’s life!

© 2018 J.C. Wolfe

congratulations

A special SHOUT OUT to a blogger who doesn’t participate but shares our challenge almost every week on his blog:

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge: JOY & FURY – The Militant Negro™

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 76th POETRY CHALLENGE USING SYNONYMS FOR THE WORDS: “Joy & Fury”

Real Life – Reena Saxena

Cinquain: Violets – Jane Dougherty Writes

Raging Storm – #Haibun | Trent’s World (the Blog)

Tanka Poetry – Empty Pews – Sharing With Others –

Permission to write – ….Bilocalalia….

Joy & Fury Haiku/For Much Deliberation

Spring is Buried–Haibun – Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY POETRY CHALLENGE #Cinquain #76: Joy & Rage | But I Smile Anyway…

Thunder – thehouseofbailey

A Defiant Embrace of Spring : a #Tanka Tuesday #tankaprose – Frank J. Tassone

Passion to Bliss | like mercury colliding…

Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday: Joy and Fury – Afterwards

A Shamanic Journey – Calm and Chaos

Immutable | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Being Canny – Smell The Coffee

Dog-poet tries a Cinquain | Mucky Boots and Flawless Paws

The Road You’re On (Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Tanka Tuesday | Twenty Four

Tanka -Intriguing Times | thoughts and entanglements

Lull Before The Storm | Stuff and what if…

Colleens Weekly Poetry Challenge No: 76 | M J Mallon Author

Emotions on a Blank Page (Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge – #Haibun) | The Wolfe’s (Writing) Den

Delight | Charmed Chaos

My First Attempt #Butterfly Cinquain – Sharing With Others –

#Poetrychallenge – Joy and Fury – Robbie’s inspiration

Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge No. 76 – PrairieChat

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Joy & Fury | Annette Rochelle Aben

Billy Ray Chitwood: (We had trouble with links)

Rapture and Outrage (Joy and Fury)
(Haiku)

What Rapture can there be

When the veins carry outrage?

Naught can this mind so infer!

(©BR Chitwood – 3/25/18)

Agony & the Ecstasy/Rereading Jane Eyre 

Do it Keep Writing POETRY! See you tomorrow for the new weekly challenge post No. 77 ❤

Never miss another post from the Fairy Whisperer again. Click HERE to subscribe to my weekly newsletter filled with the magic from my blog. Hugs and thanks for subscribing. ❤

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celtic Tree Of Life – Portal To Invisible Worlds And Source Of Sacred Knowledge | Ancient Pages

Some of the stories we consider to be myths are actually steeped in ancient beliefs. The tree of life appears in most major religions and its symbolism is recognized around the world. “The Celtic Tree of Life served as a portal to invisible worlds and became a source of sacred knowledge, guarded by the most enlightened ones.” Read more by clicking the link below.

Ellen Lloyd – AncientPages.com shares: To ancient Celt’s nature and animals were sacred and must be treated with respect. The spiritual world was invisible. There were gateways leading from the material into the spiritual world. The physical world was believed to be much more complex than we can even imagine. The Celtic Tree of Life […]

Source: Celtic Tree Of Life – Portal To Invisible Worlds And Source Of Sacred Knowledge | Ancient Pages

Weather Got You Down? Your Greek Holiday Starts TODAY!

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ARE YOU BURIED BY SNOW DRIFTS? I’ve got a remedy for that!

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Meet my friend, and author, Effrosyni Moschoudi. She has a special promotion running on a selection of her books from March 21-25, 2018!

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Effrosyni Moschoudi was born and raised in Athens, Greece. As a child, she loved to sit alone in her garden scribbling rhymes about flowers, butterflies, and ants. Today, she writes novels for people who love all things Greek.

Her debut novel, The Necklace of Goddess Athena, has won a silver medal in the 2017 book awards of Readers’ Favorite. Her historical romance, The Ebb, is an ABNA Q-Finalist. Effrosyni’s novels are Amazon bestsellers, having hit #1 several times.

Effrosyni lives in a quaint seaside town near Athens with her husband Andy, but her mind forever drifts to her beloved Greek island of Corfu.

Effrosyni’s debut novel, The Necklace of Goddess Athena is an inspiring fantasy of Greek myths mixed in with sweet romance and a touch of family drama. In 2014, it made the shortlist for the “50 Best Self-Published Books Worth Reading” from Indie Author Land. Readers’ Favorite declared it ‘A Stunning Masterpiece’ and gave it a silver medal in its 2017 International book awards.

Effrosyni’s romantic comedy, The Amulet, is a delightful beach read set on the Greek island of Sifnos. Full of tantalizing descriptions of Greek food, it’s impossible to read it and not feel ravenous! This book made it to Amazon’s #1 within a week of its launch. Give it a try today and find out what the buzz is all about!

 

To write her award-winning novel, The Ebb, Effrosyni was inspired by her love for Corfu where she spent several summers with her grandparents in the 1980s. Although The Ebb is the first book in a trilogy, it can also be enjoyed as a standalone read. Full of innocence and nostalgia, this book will transport you to a Greek paradise with its vivid descriptions from the first pages!

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Are you fond of the Greek island of Corfu or planning a holiday there? Make sure to read the guide to Moraitika and Messonghi on her website. These are the real Corfiot villages described in the trilogy as Vassilaki and Messi. Also, this post brims over with old photos and memories from 1980s Corfu.

Other than Corfu, The Ebb is also set in Brighton, England. Effrosyni has always been fascinated by the legendary West Pier in Brighton. How much do you know about it and its haunting past? Check out this post for a host of photos from The Brighton seafront – both old and new.

3d-book-ebook

Make sure to check out THIS PAGE, where you will find 2 FREE books by Effrosyni for your reading pleasure, including her brand new short story collection, Facets of Love. It’s available only on her website!

Facets of Love is FREE!

GO HERE to get a copy!

WAIT there’s more! Check out these great deals!

Escape to sunny Greece today! http://bit.ly/1MpLgjL

promo-m 2

IMG_59CBDE2E6D77-1You’re going to love these books! ❤

A Mother Always Knows – Flash Fiction

smile at carrot ranch

March 16, 2018, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about carrot cake. It can be classic or unusual. Why is there cake? How does it feature in the story? Go where the prompt leads.

Respond by March 20, 2018, to be included in the compilation (published March 21). Rules are here. All writers are welcome!

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The train clickety-clacked across the rails while rolling hills flashed outside the windows with the speed of an old movie reel. I swayed my way into a mindful moment, breathing in peace.

A loud sniff interrupted my reverie. Across from me, the woman’s red eyes blared out her secrets. Tears streamed down her face and sobs wracked her body. Our eyes met, and she shook her head, silence her shield.

Mothers recognize pain. When the throbbing ache subsides, hunger sets in. I opened the box and drew out the carrot cake, a gift for a friend. Sweets always heal.

cake-625964_1280

sweet dreamsSweet dreams on this first day of Spring. ❤

 

 

Colleen’s 2018 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 76: JOY & FURY, #SnyonymnsOnly

Welcome to Tanka Tuesday

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and by leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.


Opportunities for Poets

Wergle Flomp Humorous Poetry Contest NO FEE. The First prize is $1,000 and there’s a second prize of $250. Also, 10 Honorable Mentions will receive $100 each. The top 12 entries get published online. Judge: Jendi Reiter, assisted by Lauren Singer. Length limit: 250 lines. And there are no restrictions on age or country. DEADLINE APRIL 1st

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Launched in 2005, Mookychick—an online publisher of fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and reviews—has evolved into a community forum for just about everything. Eclectic and inclusive, they aim to connect like minds of all varieties. From fashion to faith and everything beyond, upside-down, and in-between—Mookychick wants to know about it. The best way to get a sense of what they like is to read the magazine online.

Mookychick is published frequently, and since 2005 they’ve showcased over 600 regular contributors. Although they don’t pay authors, they promote poets and writers by publishing author profiles and sharing their work with a broad readership.

Authors of fiction may submit short stories up to 2,000 words in length. Mookychick also likes to publish flash fiction up to 500 words, and 50-word stories that are exactly 50 words (not including the title). Poets are also welcome to submit.

Mookychick publishes a wide variety of nonfiction. They like articles on personal matters of all types, articles on self-care, opinion pieces, and interviews. They also publish reviews of books, comics, games, music, and events. They usually prefer pieces that are at least 350 words in length, but they also publish photo essays with fewer words. They don’t impose a maximum word count because they want authors to write until they’re finished.

All submissions should include a third-person bio, and authors can choose to include a personal link and photo if they want. Mookychick likes to build each author an individual profile page.

They accept submissions from all types of people and aim to promote marginalized voices as often as they can. They prefer pieces on marginalized perspectives to be written by people who embody those perspectives.

Mookychick accepts submissions via email, not online or by post. They don’t accept previously published work, even if it only appeared on a personal blog or social media.

If you would like to learn more or submit to Mookychick, please visit their website at mookychick.co.uk.

~*~

Kingdoms in the Wild, an online literary magazine launched in 2016, is seeking poetry and fiction that moves readers beyond popular issues to the underlying heart of communication, which mends all fractures. They want to showcase writing that represents the broad spectrum of our meaning-making systems, writing from all of our vast human fields: histories, religions, cultures, and traditions. They are looking for our human essence, born in the body and then written on the page.

Kingdoms in the Wild accepts submissions year-round, and they publish new content frequently. To get an idea of what they publish, you can read the journal online. Right now they aren’t able to pay contributors, but they hope to do so in the future.

Poets may submit up to six poems. Authors of fiction may submit literary or speculative work, up to 6,000 words. Kingdoms in the Wild does not accept serialized fiction; all stories should be complete in themselves.

Kingdoms in the Wild accepts submissions via email, not online or by post. They accept simultaneous submissions but ask that authors withdraw work published elsewhere. They do not accept previously published work.

If you would like to learn more or submit to Kingdoms in the Wild, please visit their website at https://kingdomsinthewild.com/submit-1/.
goals

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

The main reason why I sponsor this challenge is to help budding poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

hip hip hurray

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I got this

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Life is likea cup of tea

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: JOY & FURY

 

challenge acceptedHave fun and WRITE some POETRY!

#Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge No. 75 RECAP, “Green & Patience,” #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap 

2017-11-26 12.20.41 

Last week I gave you two words that breathed spring into your week: “Green and Patience.” Our lack of moisture in Colorado Springs has me longing for springtime and the emergence of green shoots in my garden bins.

I know by experience, thoughts of spring invoke impatience in my soul. It’s hard to bide my time. Eventually, the winds will turn warm and the rains will fall, carving deep gulleys into the arid soil.

crocus-802119_1280

Brush, baked from the combination of harsh winds and the glare of the winter sun, disintegrate under my feet as I walk the permitter of the land near my house. Tiny red-polls and pink-throated house finches scold me from the safety of their perch atop my fence. The birds meekly wait for me to fill their feeder with the rich black nyjer seeds they crave.

Today, a pearly haze veils the blueness of the sky from the west as a storm gathers over the mountains. I inhale the scent of moisture, part dusty grit feathered with a cold freshness that bites at my nose.

Stoic blooms unfurl –
while winter winds groom for spring,
mountain snows fall deep.
Raw courage facing hardship
the stable crocus endures.

©2018 Colleen M. Chesebro

Read the myth of the crocus flower HERE.

Read about Bragi: The Norse GOD of POETRY here.

fairy dust wand

The Tuesday challenge post will contain the rules and links to learn how to write the different forms. Please read the post to learn how to write the poetry forms for this challenge. Please LINK your poetry to that post – NOT this one. ❤

poet of the week

This week’s POET of the WEEK is Reena Saxena.

reena saxena

I found myself enthralled with her Garland Cinquain called: Generations – Reena Saxena. There is so much to say about this splendid piece of writing. First, the presentation is amazing the way it is placed on the page – just like a ribbon garland.

Next, each cinquain follows a path like the passing of time reflecting synonyms for the words patience and green. Look at how this poem is created:

The first 5 stanzas follow this pattern:

Line 1 has 2 syllables.
Line 2 has 4 syllables.
Line 3 has 6 syllables.
Line 4 has 8 syllables.
Line 5 has 2 syllables.

And the final cinquain follows this pattern:

Line 1 is line 1 from stanza 1.
Line 2 is line 2 from stanza 2.
Line 3 is line 3 from stanza 3.
Line 4 is line 4 from stanza 4.
Line 5 is line 5 from stanza 5.

The sixth Cinquain is made up of lines from the other cinquains and almost reads like a stream of consciousness writing which I find most satisfying. I sense a depth to her words enhanced by the image of the man. SPLENDID! Learn how to write Garland Cinquains HERE.

mari-lezhava-265675-unsplash

“Generations”

by Reena Saxeena

freshness

being challenged

by collective wisdom

borderline of existence

battles

 

life

unlined by

threads of experience

weaves rawness in embroidered

perseverance

 

mature

mind regrets

its gutsy thoughtlessness

belie self-imposed suffering

stillness

 

time

watches amused

on the sideline

recurring stories of conflict

sangfroid

contact

poking embers

unfolding fresh meaning

generating respect, all battles

ending

 

freshness

unlined by

its gutsy thoughtlessness

recurring stories of conflict

ending

© 2018 Reena Saxena

congratulations

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 75th POETRY CHALLENGE USING SYNONYMS FOR THE WORDS: “Green & Patience”

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 75: “Patience & Green” #SnynonymsOnly – LadyleemanilaTanka Tuesday |

Twenty FourTanka Tuesday | Twenty Four

Bud burst – Jane Dougherty Writes

It Will Come, It Will Come… – #haibun #haiku | Trent’s World (the Blog)

Generations – Reena Saxena

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 75: “PATIENCE & GREEN” #SNYNONYMSONLY | willowdot21

#Tanka Poetry Challenges – Sharing With Others – Est. 11-15-2017

Prairie Sky -Tanka – PrairieChat

Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday: Green and Patience – Afterwards

Dog-poet’s ditty | Mucky Boots and Flawless Paws

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY POETRY CHALLENGE #Tanka #Cinquain #Haiku #74: Renew & Fresh | But I Smile Anyway…

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA TUESDAY #POETRY CHALLENGE NO. 75: “PATIENCE & GREEN” #SNYNONYMSONLY – thehouseofbailey

Beneath the Frosted Pines #Haiku | Lemon Shark Reef

Enchanted #midnighthaiku | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

#Poetrychallenge – Green and patience – Robbie’s inspiration

Cerebral Palsy Awareness | Hosking’s Blog

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge 75 – The Bag Lady

Outcry – Colleen’s Weekly Challenge – No-Madder Nomadder

Spring Interrupted | like mercury colliding…

Hearthfire: A #Tanka Tuesday-on-a-Wednesday #tankaprose #Quadrille – Frank J. Tassone

Looking up – ….Bilocalalia….

Seasonal Charm | Stuff and what if…

Sighing for Spring: Haibun – Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

TANKA TUESDAY No. 75 Patience and Green. #micropoetry #tanka #haiku – The Kettle Clicks…

Waiting for Spring (Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge – #Tanka) | The Wolfe’s (Writing) Den

#Haiku: Moss | Charmed Chaos

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Patience & Green | Annette Rochelle Aben

Wild Weather – Calm and Chaos

Wierd Weather/Calm & Chaos

My Pen/Rashmi Sortur

Tokens of Change/Katja Rammer

 

follow your heartWrite some poetry!