“The Fairy Tree,” A #Haibun

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of peace & tear. Remember, synonyms are encouraged. Please read the directions on my challenge post to make sure you are following the rules for these forms of poetry.

Please read the directions on my challenge post to make sure you are following the rules for Haiku, Haibun, and Tanka. ❤

This week, I decided to write a Haibun with a Tanka, called “The Fairy Tree.” I used “calm” for “peace” and “splitting” for “tear.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your prose & poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: Pinterest: Quotes about poetry

Scarlet skies afire
splitting the calm asunder
silence tears the morn.
Wheat heavy with the harvest
announces autumn’s glory.

I crept closer to the fairy tree which stood like a lone sentry in the middle of the field. The late summer wheat, thick with seed heads undulated like waves as I forced my way through the scratchy stalks. At the base of the tree, I gazed between the branches filled with golden leaves. The bees clustered at the opening to the apiary emitting a gentle hum which soothed my nerves.

Quietly, I watched the activity in the hive. I felt no fear and knew the bees would recognize me. I spied the queen at once. Her body was larger and heavier than the other bees. Her female workers gathered around her performing the spirit dance – an homage of sorts to their royal genealogy. Tiny black and yellow bodies twirled and clustered about the majestic mother. Myriads of lacy wings beat a gentle song remembering an ancient heritage written through the ages.

The queen had one job, and that was to lay eggs. This summer I watched as she laid over 2000 eggs a day. The drones were long gone having been evicted from the colony after they had mated with the queen. Her royal highness would have no need of the drones from here on out. She had enough sperm to last for at least five years. Their deaths had been necessary for the survival of the hive’s collective consciousness. I knew the legacy of this colony needed to survive. I had to find the answers.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

I have entered the writing zone! My fairy nymphs have summoned me, and I am working hard on the second book in The Heart Stone Chronicles series – The Meadow Fairy. Abby Forester, the Fairy Whisperer, must solve the mystery of the disappearing bees! ❤

Read: Why Are the Bees Dying?

fairy vibes

Next Tuesday for the next poetry challenge.

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 31 – PEACE & TEAR

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

THANK YOU FOR THE BIRTHDAY POETRY! TO SHOW MY APPRECIATION, I REBLOGGED YOUR POSTS. THESE WERE THE BEST PRESENTS EVER! ❤

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. All hyperlinks are purple and I’ve underlined as many as I could. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

The haiku is a Japanese verse in three lines. Line one has 5 syllables, line 2 has 7 syllables, and line three has 5 syllables. Haiku is a mood poem, and it doesn’t use any metaphors or similes. 5/7/5.

Wikipedia explains:

“”Haiku” is a term sometimes loosely applied to any short, impressionistic poem, but there are certain characteristics that are commonly associated with the genre:

  • a focus on some aspect of nature or the seasons[1][2]
  • division into two asymmetrical sections, usually with a cut at the end of the first or second section, creating a juxtaposition of two subjects (e.g. something large and something small, something natural and something human-made, two unexpectedly similar things, etc.)
  • a contemplative or wistful tone and an impressionistic brevity[3][4][5]
  • elliptical “telegram style” syntax and no superfluous words
  • imagery predominates over ideas and statements, so that meaning is typically suggestive, requiring reader participation
  • avoidance of metaphor and similes
  • non-rhyming lines

Some additional traits are especially associated with English-language haiku (as opposed to Japanese-language haiku):

  • A three-line format with 17 syllables arranged in a 5–7–5 pattern;[2][a][6][7][8] or about 10 to 14 syllables,[9][10] which more nearly approximates the duration of a Japanese haiku[11] with the second line usually the longest. Some poets want their haiku to be expressed in one breath[12][13][14]
  • little or no punctuation or capitalization, except that cuts, are sometimes marked with dashes or ellipses, and proper nouns are usually capitalized.”

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click PUBLICIZE to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 30th POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – WISH & MAGIC: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 30 – Wish & Magic | Ladyleemanila

Happy Birthday, Colleen! #Tanka Tuesday – Reena Saxena

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #30 – Wish & Magic – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #30 – Wish & Magic/Two on a Rant

Wishing – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic 2 Birthday

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic/Edwina’s Episodes

She’s still mad at me – Playing with words

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 30 – Wish & Magic | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Happy Birthday Colleen | The Syllabub Sea

Colleen’s poetry challenge#30-wish & magic (Tanka) – Uniquesus

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 – Wish & Magic/Stuff & What If?

Time Paradox: NaPoWriMo | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Magic Wings | method two madness

Desire (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

Wishing (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

#Poetry challenge #30# Tanka# wish & magic – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

NaPoWriMo Day 22: Earth – My Feelings My Freedom

No Magic Answers | Faith Unlocked

Indistinguishable | Faith Unlocked

Up River/Word & Image Collages

“The Celebration” – A Haibun – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s Poet of the Week is me! I figure I can share my Haibun once a year on my birthday. I hope you will enjoy. I wrote it to honor Earth Day, which was celebrated on April 22nd, worldwide.

The Celebration – A Haibun

As the sun kisses my face, I reach my arms toward the brightness of the pale blue sky. The festival is nigh. Today is Earth Day, and I feel mother Gaia firm and fertile under the crusty snow beneath my feet. There is a coolness to the springtime breeze that drifts around me like a mist filled with ancient memories. The scent of marsh grasses fills my soul with a yearning that cannot be quenched. I feel the old magic here. I pause and wait. My only wish is to feel its warm embrace.

Meadow fairies call
from their dark caves down under
while magic roots stir
new growth surrenders
lamenting the cold spring snow

A flock of Lark Buntings takes wing filling the sky with their dark shadows. Startled, I turn and stare at the thick brown cattails as they rattle and shake from the bird’s departure in the shallow arroyo. My enchantment is complete while the sound of their avian voices echoes in my heart. Yes, the old magic is here and another season is mine to keep.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: PEACE & TEAR

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

Entering the #Writing ZONE

It’s time… I will be entering the Twilight Writing ZONE for the next couple of months. That means I will not be on social media and the blogs as frequently as before. I will check in frequently and share how the writing is progressing. I will also continue my Tuesday Poetry Challenge.

The dreams have started again… Abby Forester and the meadow fairy have to solve the problem of the bees disappearing. Aunt Magnolia has taken a new job with a paranormal researcher in Colorado and strange things are beginning to happen. You will want to read this!

2016-08-10 07.00.27

The Meadow Fairy, Book 2 of The Heart Stone Chronicles

Fourteen-year-old Abigale Forester journeys from Blackberry Ridge, Florida to Bent Grass, Colorado when her Aunt Magnolia accepts a job as a researcher working for an author who specializes in writing about myths and paranormal activity.

Abby, along with her deceased mother’s most sacred possession, a calcite pendant, continues her legacy as a Fairy Whisperer to the primordial fairy nymphs who inhabit unique places scattered about the world.

In Colorado, Abby meets two young friends, Crosby and Landon Miller, who along with their family are beekeepers on a small farm under the shadow of Pike’s Peak. Abby is summoned by a primeval nymph who asks her to resolve the secret of why the bee population is disappearing from the prairie meadows.

With the help of Nate Bannock, a Native American Ute rancher, Abby learns the astonishing truths behind the decimation of the bee population.

Does Abby have what it takes to save the bees and the Meliae Meadow Nymphs before it is too late?

You want to know how it all turns out don’t you?

Gotta RunThe mystery awaits!

 

 

 

“The Celebration” – A Haibun

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of wish & magic. Remember, synonyms are encouraged.

This week, I decided to write a Haibun with a Tanka, called “The Celebration.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your prose & poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: Babble.com


Image credit: Imgflip.com

“The Celebration”

As the sun kisses my face, I reach my arms toward the brightness of the pale blue sky. The festival is nigh. Today is Earth Day, and I feel mother Gaia firm and fertile under the crusty snow beneath my feet. There is a coolness to the springtime breeze that drifts around me like a mist filled with ancient memories. The scent of marsh grasses fills my soul with a yearning that cannot be quenched. I feel the old magic here. I pause and wait. My only wish is to feel its warm embrace.

Meadow fairies call
from their dark caves down under
while magic roots stir
new growth surrenders
lamenting the cold spring snow

A flock of Lark Buntings takes wing filling the sky with their dark shadows. Startled, I turn and stare at the thick brown cattails as they rattle and shake from the bird’s departure in the shallow arroyo. My enchantment is complete while the sound of their avian voices echoes in my heart. Yes, the old magic is here and another season is mine to keep.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Thanks for stopping by.

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Colleen’s #Book #Reviews – “Savage Payback, Book 3 in the Jack Calder Crime Series,” by Author, @Seumas Gallacher

  • Title:  SAVAGE PAYBACK (Jack Calder Crime Series #3)
  • Author: Seumas Gallacher a GoodReads Author
  • File Size: 803 KB
  • Print Length: 300 Pages
  • Publisher: SGC PUBLISHING
  • Publication Date: October 18, 2013
  • Sold By: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00G00GZEO
  • Formats:  Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Crime, Crime Fiction, Murder, Heist


IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

“A series of coordinated lethal bomb attacks on a dozen jewelry stores in London’s West End drag former SAS officer, Jack Calder and his specialist security firm, International Security Partners, into a deadly mesh of murder and international drug running.

A black ops explosives expert, an ex-colleague turned renegade mercenary with a twisted lust for revenge, emerges from the past to join forces with a powerful and dangerous drug baron from Eastern Europe.

A major cocaine trafficker from South America compounds the threats as competitive turf issues straddle international territories.

Attacks close to home heighten the urgency for Calder and his team to find and deal with each of the three sinister adversaries in a final savage payback.

A Jack Calder Novel”

MY RECOMMENDATION:

I have been a fan of British crime novels since the late 1970’s when I was stationed in England. One day I found a treasure trove of cheap paperbacks at the local outside market, and that was all it took. I was hooked! There is just something about the word usage and the pacing which is always different than American crime novels.

I could hardly contain my excitement when I finally reached the middle of my To Be Read pile of books, and Savage Payback stared back at me. I was apprehensive because it was the third book in the series and I worried if I would be able to pick up enough background information on the characters to understand the plot.

I had nothing to worry about. Savage Payback passed with flying colors as its own stand alone novel. It swept me into a world filled with the violence of drug cartels and the callousness of Drug Enforcement Officers, Special Forces, and the kind of people that kill for money. Beware, the novel is violent, and the descriptions are not for the faint of heart.

The plot is quick, and from the beginning, the reader is thrust into the action when an attack on multiple jewelry stores explodes from the pages. The mystery of who was behind the attack develops at a steady pace. I was pleasantly surprised by many of the twists and turns which helped to move the story forward.

I love characters, and Gallacher’s Jack Calder is one of the best. Jack and his crew from the ISP (an international security firm manned by ex-SAS and other police/special forces personnel) are called in to solve the theft of the jewels and the murders involved in the attack. It doesn’t take long for the reader to find out that the ISP is also targeted.

When an attack is successful against Jack’s wife, Mae Ling, the story pivots and the reader is taken on a rollercoaster of events culminating in a climax of an ending. The suspense was superb!

Now, I need to start from the beginning of the series and learn all there is to know about Jack Calder.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: s
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate:  5 out of 5 stars



Author, Seumas Gallacher

About the Author

SEUMAS GALLACHER escaped from the world of finance five years ago, after a career spanning three continents and five decades.

As the self-professed ‘oldest computer Jurassic on the planet,’ his headlong immersion into the dizzy world of eBook publishing opened his eyes, mind, and pleasure to the joys of self-publishing. As a former businessman, he rapidly understood the concept of a writer’s need to ‘build the platform,’ and from a standing start began to develop a social networking outreach, which now tops 15,000 direct contacts.

His first two crime-thrillers, THE VIOLIN MAN’S LEGACY, and VENGEANCE WEARS BLACK blew his mind with more than 75,000 e-link downloads/sales to date. The third in what has become the ‘Jack Calder’ series, SAVAGE PAYBACK, was launched late 2013.

He started a humorous, informative, self-publishers blog less than two years ago, never having heard of a ‘blog’ prior to that, was voted ‘Blogger of the Year 2013’ and now has a loyal blog following on his networks. He says the novels contain his ‘Author’s Voice,’ while the blog carries his ‘Author’s Brand.’ And he’s LUVVIN IT!

Author contacts:

BLOG: Seumasgallacher.com

FACEBOOK: Seumas Gallacher

TWITTER: @Seumas Gallacher

Looking for a book to read this weekend? Savage Payback is full of action, suspense, and thrills… What are you waiting for?


Nuts and Bolts: “Thought” Verbs | LitReactor

“In six seconds, you’ll hate me.

But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward – at least for the next half year – you may not use “thought” verbs.  These include:  Thinks, Knows, Understands, Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred others you love to use.

The list should also include:  Loves and Hates.”

“Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present the details that allow the reader to know them.  Instead of a character wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader wants it.”

YOU WANT TO READ THIS ARTICLE! CLICK THE LINK BELOW:

Source: Nuts and Bolts: “Thought” Verbs | LitReactor

Wishing (a Tanka)

My birthday keeps generating the gift of poetry. Here’s a Tanka from John that has a wonderful message for all of us! ❤

John W. Leys

Wish upon a star
Blow your birthday candles out
Nothing will happen.
Act on your dreams; make them real
Like magic, your life will change.

4/18/17

This tanka is my response toColleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 30 – Wish & Magic(Hope you had a great birthday, Colleen!)

Poem #20 for National Poetry Writing Month (aka #<a href=”http://www.napowrimo.net/”>NaPoWriMo</a>)

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Amazon’s New KDP Print Feature is Bad News for CreateSpace Users

Important information to read about Amazon & CreateSpace. ❤️

Diana Tibert

The first news I heard about KDP Print was in an email from Amazon on February 15th. Since then, I’ve read articles, blog posts and comments about it and watched the praise given by Amazon for this service dwindle quickly.

In the email, Amazon announced they were making print book publishing easier for writers. They stated, “KDP prints your book on demand and subtracts your printing costs from your royalties, so you don’t have to pay any costs upfront or carry any inventory.”

That’s what CreateSpace does. Sort of. I believe CreateSpace takes the cost of the printing of the book from the sale price, then takes a cut of the royalties. Until I see the numbers and do the math, I am unsure which service will offer a better financial deal for authors.

The message also stated, “It also enables you to receive consolidated royalty payments for paperback and…

View original post 1,297 more words