» Writing Is My Job.

I like to think that I am a work in progress when it comes to my writing. I haven’t gotten paid for anything I’ve written (yet) but I am going to keep working on perfecting my craft. Don’t get downhearted… read this and keep writing and learning. ❤ Click the highlighted link at the bottom of the post to read more.

Every writer, at some point in their career, has heard the words, “Writing isn’t a real job.”  Only another writer can truly understand the frustration of hearing those words and being made to feel as if your dream is only a waste of time.  It can be even worse if someone suggests that it is time to stop playing around on the computer and find something meaningful to do.

Source: » Writing Is My Job.

The Six Month Novel Writing Plan

Click the highlighted link at the bottom of the post to read this author’s plan of how to write a book in 6 months. You never know… this could work for you! ❤

Most authors have heard of National Novel Writing Month, also known as NaNoWriMo. It is a novel writing challenge where participants try to write a 50,000 word novel during the month of November. Many famous authors, including John Green Rainbow Rowell have participated.

But for many writers that work full time writing a novel in one month is difficult, if not impossible. Before I had a child, I completed NaNoWriMo twice, although I did not have a full time job either time I did it…

http://www.authorspublish.com/the-six-month-novel-writing-plan/

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #1 Harvest & Moon

Happy Tuesday everyone! Are you ready to get your poetry groove on? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s talk TANKA poetry.

WHY TANKA POETRY?

I love to write Tanka poetry because it is a Japanese poem consisting of five lines, the first and third of which have five syllables and the other seven, making 31 syllables in all and giving a complete picture of an event or mood. 5/7/5/7/7 is the exact breakdown of syllables. Even though I love Haiku for its brevity, I have found that writing a Tanka gives you more of a story. Since we’re all writers and storyteller’s here, I thought it would be perfect to inspire your creativity to new heights. Get ready to share your true feelings!

Here’s WHY I want to sponsor this challenge:

To inspire creativity from a different poetry form

To have fun and enjoy Tanka

To share and for the chance to get to know each other

To inspire and create a community of Tanka lovers

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has.

Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

Poets.org gives the definition and the rules for the writing of a Tanka. Please note the following from the site:

“In many ways, the tanka resembles the sonnet, certainly in terms of treatment of the subject. Like the sonnet, the tanka employs a turn, known as a pivotal image, which marks the transition from the examination of an image to the examination of the personal response. This turn is located within the third line, connecting thekami-no-ku, or upper poem, with the shimo-no-ku, or lower poem.”

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
time). That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I encourage everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that should be used (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

To do a Ping Back: Copy the URL (the http:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or click like. I also need at least a Ping Back or a link in the comments section in order to know you participated and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

I want you to be CREATIVE. Use your own photos and create “Visual Tankas” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you wish to make your own images. Click the links to go to the programs.


I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your own post:

Many thanks to Ronovan’s Writes and his Haiku Challenge which inspired this event. I used his “Rules” for this challenge.

That’s it! Are you ready to write a Tanka?

Here are our two words for this week’s challenge:

“Harvest & Moon”


In my solitude

deepest felt in the autumn,

leaves of red and gold

begin shedding summer’s clothes,

reflecting the harvest moon.

Writing a Tanka is like writing a Haiku (5/7/5) and adding two more lines. See how much more of a “visual image” you get in your mind’s eye?

Did you recognize the pivot in the third line? We start out talking about my solitude, and then we switch to talking about the leaves of red and gold. The words are all interconnected and are talking about my response to autumn. It is important to try to incorporate your feelings into your Tanka.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com. She gives excellent instructions on how to incorporate your feelings into this poetry form.

See you next week! Don’t forget to link your post to this one! I can’t wait to read your Tanka poetry. Hugs.

How to Prepare for NaNoWriMo: Your 4-Week Success Plan

A great article to help you prepare for NaNoWriMo. I’m participating this year! ❤ Click the highlighted link below to read their tips.

Sure, the goal of NaNoWriMo is to sprint toward the finish line. But planning in October can help you succeed.

Source: How to Prepare for NaNoWriMo: Your 4-Week Success Plan

Interview – Frances Kelvin Otung

Two great friends here. Jennifer Nichole Wells, and Francis Otung. Poets – check out Felan! ❤

fēlan

IMG_20160430_181009_editfko

Click through the following links to read Frances’ past interviews. Issue 1, 2, 5 & 6.

Tell us about the specific inspiration behind one or each of your accepted pieces.
I was doing a piece for a friend on ‘BEAUTY’ and it occurred to me that the beautiful may not always be “Beautiful”. Like the broken pottery that is held together with gold, a Japanese Art of Kintsugi which values breakage and imperfections. According to Wikipedia, “As a philosophy it treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise.”

fēlan is old English for feel. What makes you feel fascination?
Fascination springs from the intrigues that little scenes bring my way, like the wonders of childbirth, the unfolding of petals, the sprouting of new seeds – these and more keep me in awe. The constant amazement at life itself…

View original post 38 more words

Nerve Wracking | Grammarly Blog

mind-crushing

The Grammarly Blog brings us another great explanation of which phrase is correct… wracking or racking! Click the highlighted link at the end of the post to read their explanation. ❤

“Nerve-racking” is the original and correct spelling of this phrase, which describes something that makes you extremely nervous. “Nerve-wracking” is a widely-used and well-established variant…

Source: Nerve Wracking | Grammarly Blog

Elemental Beings

There are four elements in nature: fire, air, earth, and water. In fact, our ancient astrological signs are based on these four elements.

The three fire signs are Aries, Leo, and Sagittarius. The three air signs are Libra, Aquarius, and Gemini. The three earth signs are Capricorn, Taurus, and Virgo. And lastly, the three water signs are Cancer, Scorpio, and Pisces.

Even ancient humans recognized the power of the elements. Antiquity is filled with the myths and stories of the elementals.

Each element has a spiritual energy attached to it. This spiritual energy, in my humble opinion, is what the fairies are composed of. Many take the form of birds, animals, or even insects for protection from human intervention. They consist of cosmic energy and inhabit a parallel plane of existence. When they do show us their true forms they resemble Gnomes (earth), Salamanders (Fire), Sylphs (Air), and Undines (water).

The gnomes are the nature spirits belonging to the earth. There is a subgroup listed as well. They are Brownies, Dryads, Durdalis, Earth spirits, Elves, Hamadryads, Pans, Pygmies, Sylvestres, and Satyrs.

The Salamanders are the ancient beings that are fire. We can’t live without them, as ancient man found out. These are the most powerful of the elementals and ruled by Djinn. They resemble balls of fire or lizard-like creatures almost a foot in length.

The Sylphs are air spirits said to live at the highest peaks of the mountains. They are the rulers of the winds and have a temperamental nature.

The Undines control the waters of the earth. They live within the water atoms and cannot be seen with normal vision. There is a subgroup of Undines which are Limoniades, Mermaids, Naiads, Oceanid, Oreads, Potamides, Sea Maids, and Water Spirits.

The Undines are what I based my Naiad fairy nymphs off of in my debut novel. That is why I portrayed my swamp fairy to be green-skinned; resembling the water of the swamp she inhabits.

swamp-fairy

Each elemental being is unique to their environment and they mirror that existence on earth. I believe they can understand our human thoughts. However, they are not individualized beings. They belong to a collective consciousness that lives on a separate plane from us. I often describe them as bees belonging to a hive, communicating for the collective good of the particular hive, or clan.

The elementals are not immortal and cannot be destroyed by the four elements because they are etheric and part of the four elements of nature. Nature takes care of their own, although elementals cannot change their element. They can’t start out as a Salamander and switch to an Undine, for example.

It is not surprising then when my research on the elementals revealed that when their time on earth is finished, they are absorbed back into the collective consciousness of the elemental realm. I feel they are reborn or reincarnated when their expertise is called upon to aid humanity once more.

The Elementals answer only to the Devas.

Wikipedia shares:

“A deva (देव Sanskrit and Pāli) in Buddhism is one of many different types of non-human beings who share the godlike characteristics of being more powerful, longer-lived, and, in general, much happier than humans, although the same level of veneration is not paid to them as to Buddha’s.”

Summitlighthouse.org
is a great place to learn more about the elementals.

Thanks for stopping by to learn about the elementals with me. ❤